Ours To Destroy | Ours To Destroy

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CANADA - B.C.

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Avant Garde: Psychedelia Folk: Psych-folk Moods: Type: Experimental
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Ours To Destroy

by Ours To Destroy

Anarchist folk rock. What's that? Think of it as music that starts out as folk but ends up somewhere else. This album dips into country, rock, heavy rock, pop, experimental, and traditional protest folk but forms a cohesive whole with an accent on melody.
Genre: Avant Garde: Psychedelia
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Checkmate
3:31 $0.50
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2. Two Thousand Sunsets
2:31 $0.50
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3. Dread
3:31 $0.50
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4. Skipping Rope of Daisies
3:31 $0.50
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5. Happy Now
4:20 $0.50
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6. Plastic Sparkles
3:02 $0.50
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7. Politician's Wishes
2:20 $0.50
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8. Exorcising Demons
4:15 $0.50
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9. There are no words for here
1:15 $0.50
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10. Prairies
2:58 $0.50
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11. Holidays
4:09 $0.50
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12. Unglued
2:24 $0.50
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13. Don't Give a Damn
5:33 $0.50
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14. 50 Steps Closer to Evil
1:16 $0.50
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15. Happy Now (Radio Friendly Version)
4:10 $0.50
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Ours to Destroy are Steve Dodd and David Morley, a duo from Calgary, Alberta, with a talent for adding modern indie edge, psychedelia and found sounds to folk music. Major influences include Wilco, the Eels, the Flaming Lips, and Modest Mouse.

Their next major gig as a full four piece band is at the Broken City in Calgary on December 3, 2007.

REVIEWS

Amanda Putz, New Music Canada

"After searching through quite a few different songs Prairies played like a brilliant beacon on a dark, flatland highway. It is a FABULOUS song and I can't wait to hear more from Ours to Destroy."

Rusty, ThePlugg.com

"The minute I clicked play on their song ‘Two Thousand Sunsets’ it completely took me away from what I was doing and put my mind somewhere in the desert, driving a broken down Ford thinking of the next chapter in my journey. Their music is very eclectic and you won’t find one song similar to another."

Charles Martin, Indie-Music.com

"...a slow-cooked collection of divergent herbs and spices, drawing inspiration from Lou Reed, Wilco, Johnny Cash, and The Pixies."

Rebecca Lazarenko, The Brock Press

"...seemed to challenge all genres at once, mixing a distinctive type of heavier folk rock with a hint of almost electronic-style pop."

Kent Manthie, Reviewer Magazine

"OTD is a kind of neo-psychedelic rock band, with a certain quirkiness that recalls Guided by Voices, but they have gone their own way and followed their own muse and that is usually what brings out the best in people, this being no exception."

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Reviews


to write a review

Jonathan Carnahan (floweezy)

"Prepare To Renew Your Sybaritic Aspirations" (a.k.a. get this cd)
I was very fortunate to stumble upon "Ours to Destroy" several months ago and have followed their progress with this self titled debut. Their website, ourstodestroy.com, has given periodic updates with the CD's developments and release, and I was thrilled once it finished production and is now "stuck" in my CD player. Now...to the tunes...as soon as the CD starts up then you're whisked away to "their world", which is filled with fields of cherry flavored candy and multicolored unicorns...oh yeah, and deep blackness. Immediately, tracks like "Checkamte", "Two Thousand Sunsets", and "Skipping Rope of Daisies" show Damo and Dodd's unique ability to adapt original melodies and lyrics to cemented folk/rock compositions. Once you delve into "Dread" and "Happy Now" prepare to be synthesized with emotions like; shock, paranoia, and relief. Those two tracks wreak of "absurd rock" and reflect like a warped mirror to bands like; Ween and Flaming Lips. Be sure NOT to ignore the second half of the album as you can't miss out on the musical gems of "Prairies" and "Holidays". The album is just so well composed and arranged, and Damo and Dodd sound like veterans in the studio.

I'm excited and proud to give this album my full endorsement and can't wait for another installment of Dodd and Damo's incongruous tendencies recorded onto disc form. Not to be too broad, but if you like anything then get this CD.

Jonathan of "floweezy"
Read more...

Jonathan Carnahan (floweezy)

"Prepare To Renew Your Sybaritic Aspirations" (a.k.a. get this cd)
I was very fortunate to stumble upon "Ours to Destroy" several months ago and have followed their progress with this self titled debut. Their website, ourstodestroy.com, has given periodic updates with the CD's developments and release, and I was thrilled once it finished production and is now "stuck" in my CD player. Now...to the tunes...as soon as the CD starts up then you're whisked away to "their world", which is filled with fields of cherry flavored candy and multicolored unicorns...oh yeah, and deep blackness. Immediately, tracks like "Checkamte", "Two Thousand Sunsets", and "Skipping Rope of Daisies" show Damo and Dodd's unique ability to adapt original melodies and lyrics to cemented folk/rock compositions. Once you delve into "Dread" and "Happy Now" prepare to be synthesized with emotions like; shock, paranoia, and relief. Those two tracks wreak of "absurd rock" and reflect like a warped mirror to bands like; Ween and Flaming Lips. Be sure NOT to ignore the second half of the album as you can't miss out on the musical gems of "Prairies" and "Holidays". The album is just so well composed and arranged, and Damo and Dodd sound like veterans in the studio.

I'm excited and proud to give this album my full endorsement and can't wait for another installment of Dodd and Damo's incongruous tendencies recorded onto disc form. Not to be too broad, but if you like anything then get this CD.

Jonathan of "floweezy"
Read more...

The Brock Press: Rebecca Lazarenko

A refreshing challenge of all genres at once
Out of 15 tracks on the album, I could not find one obvious single or conventional radio hit from Ours to Destroy's self-titled debut. More accurately, I could not find a Top-40 radio sensation that would be overplayed on genre-neutral stations. In other words, it was refreshing.

As your average listener, I consume a lot of mainstream music and enjoy it along the way. This CD, however, seemed to challenge all genres at once, mixing a distinctive type of heavier folk rock with a hint of almost electronic- style pop - both of which I usually have no interest in. Screaming examples of this are songs such as "Skipping Rope of Daisies" and "Plastic Sparkles".

I do not want to say that this band is beginning to find their voice as that sounds as if they are only starting out and have no business in making a record yet - and
these guys do.

I am actually rather surprised that this band is not more popular. Instead of releasing a debut album of safe bet rock riffs and simple lyrics, Ours to Destroy has taken the chance of being distinctly apart and rather political right out of the gate.

Many of the melodies are really very beautiful, others equally passionate, and the lead vocalist has this old crooner sort of vibe that can pull off a lyrical storyline.

This is certainly a band you want to start following now; there is really no telling where they go from here and if this CD is any indication, it is certainly worth coming along for the ride.
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John Simmonds: Steamroller

Anyone with an appreciation for good writing, and originality should give Ours T
Ours To Destroy describe themselves as an "anarchist folk abstract". In fact on their website, they reach out for fan participation in classifying their genre, as well as contributing to their next album. I was actually quite impressed with their website, even though I'm supposed to be reviewing their music.

Keeping in mind that this band is not your average pop/rock band, I was instantly intrigued by them. Having been my given my choice of band to write about, after hearing 10 seconds of "Checkmate", I new this was the band for me. As I listened more and read more about them I realized why I like them so much. They list their influences as Modest Mouse, Wilco, Ween, The Eels, the Flaming Lips, and Mark Lanegan. I can hear all of these bands within their sound and would even add Frank Zappa and The Drive By Truckers. I really enjoyed the folk country feel of "Two Thousand Sunsets", and "Skipping Rope OF Daisies". Our To Destroy seem to pride themselves on creating a mood with each song.

Out of the 5 songs on their website I would have to say "Exorcising Demons" was my favorite, but each is so different form the last it's truly difficult to pick a favorite. They are all so much their own sound, and they are all "bridged by sound montages captured during several guerilla recording sessions on the streets and in the malls of Calgary during 2005", according to their bio.

From a production standpoint, everything sounds polished and professional. The performances are all excellent, with at some times so much going on it leaves you having to listen again just to catch what you missed the first time around. There is some really nice guitar work, and vocally everything seems to fit. The samples are very tasteful, and a great use of percussion.

Ours To Destroy won't be for everyone, but anyone with an appreciation for good writing, and originality should give them a listen. "saved by the bell - rock rating"
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Terry Wray

Smorgasbord of Audio Goodness
This CD is ripe with variety. Whether you're a folkster, metal-head, punker or sugar-popper, you'll find at least one track you love. "Checkmate" is almost a tribute to the Dead Milkmen. "Dread" should be on the soundtrack for the next Quentin Tarantino movie. I'm pretty sure Tom Petty was in the studio for "Skipping Rope of Daisies". My favorite track, "Happy Now" is 3 songs in 1. How did they manage to get brooding rant, metal and 8-bit pop to work so well together? "Plastic Sparkles" hints of Pink Floyd. "50 Steps Closer to Evil" is a punk-a-rific rip on Dubya's world. I command you to own this CD and drool at the thought of a follow-up album.
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Indie-Music.com: Review by Charles Martin

A slow-cooked collection of divergent herbs and spices
Music lovers live to unearth obscure gems amidst piles of albums at record stores. The pleasant surprises are what keeps aficionados digging, and Ours To Destroy is going to make more than a few hipsters happy.

Their latest self-titled album is a slow-cooked collection of divergent herbs and spices, drawing inspiration from Lou Reed, Wilco, Johnny Cash, and The Pixies among others. Some found sounds collected at a mall are sprinkled in for texture, and the result is a layered album that began acoustic and ended up in the further reaches of the indie rock soundscape.

Steve Dodd and David Morley began recording the album at The Sound Mind Studio (owned by Dodd) in Calgary. Morely’s vocals can have a strangled speak-sing sound reminiscent of Reed, and at other times he will seem Cash-esque, like in his convict country turn in “Two Thousand Sunsets.”

Dodd and Morely are definitely music lovers of their own right and have no problem revealing their influences. Though they certainly put their own voice in all these songs, you can tell who the band was listening to during the various phases of recording.

Two versions of “Happy Now” are included, one radio-friendly and the other unfiltered. The track is classic Pixies coil-and-spring, with the feel of adolescent mood swings bouncing between aggressive, playful and bored.

The best moment of the album is one of the found sounds at the end of “Plastic Sparkles” where their mission to find sound clips in the mall comes to an abrupt end.

“Security to camera 4, security to camera 4,” an urgent security guard calls.

“Ooh, I bet that’s us, we should get out of here,” the band mumbles and chuckles.

This album is not merely a grouping of send-ups to their favorite bands, but a studied exploration of music that excites them.
Read more...