Order 3 or more physical items and get 1¢ shipping
Pacific Guitar Ensemble | Begin

Go To Artist Page

Other Genres You Will Love
Classical: Chamber Music Classical: Chamber Music Moods: Featuring Guitar
There are no items in your wishlist.

Begin

by Pacific Guitar Ensemble

Debut cd of 'the most innovative guitar ensemble ever' (sfcv.org). Featuring new pieces and arrangements by Sérgio Assad, Belinda Reynolds and Peppino D'Agostino played on nylon, steel, baroque, 11 string arch, electric and bass guitars as well as oud.
Genre: Classical: Chamber Music
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Wednesdays At Sugar (2011) - Sérgio Assad
Pacific Guitar Ensemble, Sérgio Assad, John Britton & Adam Cockerham
9:23 $0.99
clip
2. Gran Solo, Op. 14 - Fernando Sor (Arranged By Sérgio Assad)
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
8:59 $0.99
clip
3. Y Bolanzero (2001) - Terry Riley
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
12:36 $0.99
clip
4. Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, BWV 1051 - J.S. Bach - Allegro
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
5:36 $0.99
clip
5. Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, BWV 1051 - J.S. Bach - Adagio
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
4:05 $0.99
clip
6. Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, BWV 1051 - J.S. Bach - Allegro
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
5:22 $0.99
clip
7. Begin (2009) - Belinda Reynolds
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
7:28 $0.99
clip
8. Jump Rope (2010) - Peppino D'agostino (Arranged By P. D'agostino and D. Tanenbaum)
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
3:33 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Pacific Guitar Ensemble
Michael Bautista, electric and classical guitars, bass
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Lawrence Ferrara, classical guitar
Antoniy Kakamakov, classical guitar
Jon Mendle, classical and 11 string arch guitar, bass
Paul Psarras, classical and baroque guitars, oud, bass
David Tanenbaum, classical guitar, bass, conductor
Marc Teicholz, classical guitar
with special guests on Wednesdays at Sugar
Sérgio Assad, sazouki
John Britton, baroque guitar
Adam Cockerham, bass guitar
Cd Production Notes
Wednesdays at Sugar-Sérgio Assad (b. 1952)
Recorded San Francisco Conservatory Concert Hall March 8, 2012
Producer:Jason O’Connell
Engineer: Melodie Myers
Personnel:
Marc Teicholz, David Tanenbaum, Lawrence Ferrara, Antoniy Kakamakov, classical
guitars
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
John Britton, baroque guitar
Jon Mendle, 11 string arch guitar
Paul Psarras, oud
Sérgio Assad, sazouki
Michael Bautista, electric guitar
Adam Cockerham, bass guitar
Gran Solo, Op. 14-Fernando Sor (1778-1839)
Recorded at Studio SQ, San Francisco May 4, 2012
Producer: Sérgio Assad
Engineer: Justin Sachs
Personnel:
Michael Bautista, Marc Teicholz, Lawrence Ferrara, David Tanenbaum, classical guitars
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Paul Psarras, bass guitar
Y Bolanzero-Terry Riley (b. 1935)
Recorded at San Francisco Conservatory Recital Hall June 5 and 7, 2012
Producer: Sérgio Assad
Engineer: Melodie Myers
Personnel:
David Tanenbaum, Jon Mendle, Marc Teicholz, Antoniy Kakamakov, classical guitars
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Paul Psarras and Michael Bautista, bass guitars
Brandenburg Concerto No. 6-J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
Recorded at Studio SQ, San Francisco May 6, 2012
Producer: Sérgio Assad
Engineer: Justin Sachs
Personnel:
Michael Bautista, Marc Teicholz, solo guitars
Larry Ferrara, Jon Mendle, classical guitars
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Paul Psarras, baroque guitar
David Tanenbaum, bass guitar
Begin-Belinda Reynolds (b. 1967)
Recorded at San Francisco Conservatory Recital Hall June 30, 2010
Producer: Belinda Reynolds
Engineer: Jason O’Connell
Personnel
Paul Psarras, Michael Bautista, Marc Teicholz, Lawrence Ferrara, classical guitars
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Jon Mendle, bass guitar
David Tanenbaum, conductor
Jump Rope-Peppino D’Agostino (b. 1956)
Recorded at Studio SQ, San Francisco May 4, 2012
Producer: Sérgio Assad
Engineer: Justin Sachs
Personnel:
Peppino D’Agostino, steel string guitar
Michael Bautista Marc Teicholz, Antoniy Kakamakov, Lawrence Ferrara, David
Tanenbaum, classical guitars
Paul Psarras, bass guitar
Program Details (Numbers are tracks)
1. Wednesdays at Sugar (2011) -Sérgio Assad (b. 1952) *
2. Gran Solo, Op. 14-Fernando Sor (1778-1839) arranged by Sérgio Assad *
3. Y Bolanzero (2001) -Terry Riley (b. 1935)
Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, BWV 1051-J.S. Bach (1685-1750) arranged by Philippe
Paviot
4. Allegro
5. Adagio
6. Allegro
7. Begin (2009)-Belinda Reynolds (b. 1967) *
8. Jump Rope (2010)-Peppino D’Agostino (b. 1956) arranged by Peppino D’Agostino
and David Tanenbaum *
* = First Recording
Notes by David Tanenbaum
Peppino D’Agostino and I had lived and worked in the Bay Area for decades but never
met, when the Schörndorf Festival in Germany called and informed us that we would be
playing a concert together in their 1998 festival. That festival’s mission was to get
guitarists from different disciplines together, and in our case they pulled those strings
from 6,000 miles away. That first concert led to a friendship and to tours together. We
both then joined the European based World Guitar Ensemble, and when that disbanded
we decided to form a like ensemble in the Bay Area. We called our favorite colleagues
and friends together and formed the PGE. What were we trying to do with this
ensemble? Well, have a good time, first. And explore the musical possibilities of having
many pluckers of different stripes.
The first issue was creating a repertoire, and that was generated partly through
friendship as well. In 2008 Sérgio Assad joined the faculty at the San Francisco
Conservatory, and he became interested in this group from its beginning. He attended
many rehearsals, became more and more excited about the sonic possibilities, and in
2011 agreed to my request to write us a piece. But what to write?
We faculty gather on Wednesdays at a bar called Sugar during the school year. The
makeup is ever changing, depending on who’s in town and who might be visiting, and
the evenings are rather haphazard, with one eventual goal- deciding where to go to
dinner. Should we go to North Beach for Italian, or the Mission for tapas, or the Hayes
Valley if we just feel like someplace close by? People straggle in to Sugar, gather in
groups of three or four, and sometimes all talk together. Finally glasses get emptied,
hunger calls, and the group comes together with some urgency to make a final food
decision.
Wednesdays at Sugar reflects those evenings, so the piece is filled with small sections
for like instruments, surrounded by tuttis. Written for many of the regulars at Sugar on
Wednesdays, it is a celebration of Sérgio’s first four years at the school, his new friends
and experiences, One hears a big variety of plucked strings, and Sérgio joins us in the
newest of those instruments, the recently developed sazouki-a hybrid of a bouzouki and
a Turkish saz.
Having finished that piece, Sérgio had the inspiration to arrange Sor’s well known Gran
Solo for six of us, and he utilized the steel string and bass in this exhilarating version.
The steel string plays a crucial role in Terry Riley’s Y Bolanzero as well. Terry likes odd
numbers, so the seven guitars groove along in 11 (6+5) for most of this piece until an
end section in seven. There are improvisation sections for the first and second guitar.
This is part of a series of pieces that, according to the composer, “have Spanish titles
and take a different letter of that alphabet to begin their names. They are indebted to the
great Spanish music traditions and to those traditions upon which Spanish music owes
its heritage. The completed folio, of twenty-eight works for guitar, multiple guitar, and
guitar in ensemble, is called The Book Of Abbeyozzud, an invented word that contains
the letters A, for Ascension, and Z, for Zamorra, which are the beginning and end. The
central performer in the series is David Tanenbaum.” Y Bolanzero is the Y piece, and
Bolanzero is another invented word. This is the first recording of the piece with just one
guitarist to a part.
The 6th Brandenburg is the most appropriate of that set for transcription to guitar
ensemble because the original has two (mid-range) viola soloists, accompanied by just
a few low strings. We used the published transcription by Philippe Paviot, but created
our own continuo section with bass, steel and baroque guitars.
Soon after our mutual composer friend Jorge Liderman died unexpectedly in 2008, I
commissioned Belinda Reynolds to write a guitar ensemble piece with a Faculty
Development Grant from the San Francisco Conservatory. She writes that it is
“dedicated to the memory of Jorge Liderman, a renowned composer and beloved
colleague who also played the classical guitar. The work gets its name from the way the
sections of the piece interact with one another. Although the harmonic material remains
almost the same, the development of it changes in such a way that each succeeding
portion sounds like a new ‘beginning’. This is an homage to Jorge’s music, which always
surprised one with the endings never sounding like predictable endings. Jorge also
enjoyed music with a relentlessness and harmonic intensity, joking that my music was
sometimes too ‘beautiful’. As an acknowledgement to his sentiments I try to give the
material some ruggedness and get rid of the polished shine, so to speak. It is all
exposed for the listener to explore and figure out. Thanks goes to the San Francisco
Conservatory of Music for funding this work. Finally a special thanks goes to David
Tanenbaum for giving me inspiration to write this piece. Without him, this piece would
not have come to fruition.”
The disc ends with a composition by Peppino, an arrangement for ensemble of his solo
piece Jump Rope. The piece, inspired by clawhammer banjo playing, features a
persistent off beat that sounds like the high point of a jump rope. It serves as a
refreshing encore to this disc.
This recording is sponsored in part by a Faculty Development Grant from the San
Francisco Conservatory, and by funding from Omni Concerts.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review