Preacher Boy | Estate Bottled Blues

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United States - California

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Blues: Slide Guitar Blues Folk: Alternative Folk Moods: Mood: Brooding
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Estate Bottled Blues

by Preacher Boy

"A devious storm of gothic Americana and gritty country blues." —GOOD TIMES
Genre: Blues: Slide Guitar Blues
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Envelope
3:55 $0.99
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2. Saltpeter
4:07 $0.99
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3. Lost Johnny Lost
3:49 $0.99
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4. A Wilder Edge
3:36 $0.99
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5. Revelation Falls
4:54 $0.99
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6. Armageddon Days
4:57 $0.99
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7. Loveless
3:54 $0.99
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8. The Fine and the Weak
4:27 $0.99
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9. February
3:50 $0.99
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10. Fever Moon
3:31 $0.99
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11. Never Nothing Like That
3:56 $0.99
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12. Pulling Black Flowers from an Hourglass
3:38 $0.99
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13. My Love
3:13 $0.99
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14. You Ain't That Bad Off
4:31 $0.99
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15. West of the River
3:40 $0.99
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16. As If Now I Understand
4:40 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Melancholy, isolated, alternative folk-blues, bridging the gap between Townes Van Zandt, Nick Cave, Tom Waits and Skip James (if Skip James had a voice like Blind Willie McTell). A buried treasure of a ‘lost album’ lying somewhere between The Devil's Buttermilk and Demanding to Be Next.” —Greg Lonesome, Host, Rock N’ Roll Manifesto

Rediscovered. Remastered. Released. Call it Preacher Boy’s lost album. It began with a vow—write and record a new song every day for … as long as possible. It ended 42 songs later in a Chicago hospital in the middle of winter.

A chance glance into an old box led to the rediscovery of these recordings. 16 of the 42 are now commercially available for the first time. Rediscovered. Remastered. Released.

As densely layered as the recordings sound—built up with piano, organ, electric and acoustic guitars, mandolins, banjos, violins—they were all recorded in one room, to one 8-track machine. Call it ... what? Gothic Americana? Chamber Blues? Alternative Folk?

Call it Preacher Boy’s lost album. Call it Preacher Boy's new album. Call it ... Estate Bottled Blues.

Album artwork by Amy Marinelli (amymarinelli.com)


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Reviews


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PK Eiselt

Fantastic Alternate Blues!
I discovered Preacher Boy through a Tom Waits cover he did way back in 2001. From there I found his masterpiece Devil's Buttermilk and was an instant fan. I got to see him play live a few times and was awed as he sat alone on the stage with 5 guitars and just completely changed styles and genres, picking up a new guitar with each song. Early reviews describe Preacher Boy's style as - The unholy musical offspring of Tom Waits, Johnny Cash and Nick Cave. And that's a pretty accurate.

I first heard the demos of what would become Estate Bottled back in '04. I think it was a link he sent out on his news letter. And then shortly after that, Preacher Boy went into semi retirement. And for years I told my friends about this album...the greatest album never made.

I'm getting reacquainted with this masterpiece after having gotten a lo res preview of it 15 years ago. Some of these songs, like "Fine and the Weak", "February", and "Now I Understand" helped give me hope back in the dark years of '04 and '05. In some ways this was the sound track to me rebuilding my life.

These are songs that tell stories of loss and heartache, regret and failure. Where every hangover is it's own private apocalypse. These songs ooze style with vivid locations, crazy characters, and gorgeous heartbreaking wordplay.

But more than that, these songs are about redemption and perseverance. The narrator of February witnesses an apocalypse, but is still here to tell you about it. Revelation Falls paints the end of the world as a drunken bar room brawl. The Fine and the Weak observes both the highs and lows in life as an unending and interconnected dance as the last words of each verse are repeated in each new verse to twist the previous verse's meaning. And in As If Now I Understand, the narrator finds himself sinking in a spiral of anxiety, self doubt, and self loathing, only to be brought out of it by the kind touch of a friend.
Highly Recommended!
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Tom McCarthy

An amazing album....
Preacher Boy followers will find a lot to dig into here, worth many spins and ruminations. I've just scratched the surface, but these songs seem to be the equal of anything he's put out though maybe a bit different. Moodier and more turbulent. Less wisecracking and humor, more raw emotion. In spots, a torrent of language and ideas.
Is there another artist like this in popular music? If so I haven't heard him. Hard to believe these songs were forgotten for 12 years, as his album note explains. Especially "The Fine and the Weak," which is a six-course meal musically and lyrically.
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Tom McCarthy

What a feast!
Preacher Boy followers will find a lot to dig into here, worth many spins and ruminations. I've just scratched the surface but these songs seem to be the equal of anything he's put out though maybe a bit different. Moodier and more turbulent. Less humor, more raw emotion. In spots, a torrent of language and ideas.
Is there another artist like this in popular music? If so I haven't heard him. Hard to believe these songs were forgotten for 12 years, as his album note explains. Especially "The Fine and the Weak," which is a six-course meal musically and lyrically.
Read more...