Random Touch | Reverberating Apparatus

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Avant Garde: Free Improvisation Rock: Experimental Rock Moods: Type: Experimental
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Reverberating Apparatus

by Random Touch

Twelve distinctive tracks full of spine-tingling moments from this mind bending, cinematic and unorthodox group.
Genre: Avant Garde: Free Improvisation
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Home for Twilight
9:06 $0.99
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2. Before the Beginning
4:26 $0.99
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3. Apparitions of Revelry
2:15 $0.99
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4. Benevolent Outcomes
2:45 $0.99
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5. Fred Astaire-ing
5:17 $0.99
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6. Purloining the Memo
5:36 $0.99
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7. Approaching the Cusp
4:54 $0.99
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8. Fire Tending
3:29 $0.99
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9. Danger
3:52 $0.99
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10. Threshold
4:35 $0.99
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11. Re-membering
5:09 $0.99
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12. Gotta Go
1:05 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
String Theory in Action with Random Touch’s Reverberating Apparatus


9/15/2010 - Algonquin, IL – Reverberating Apparatus, the groups’ fourteenth release, is dominated by a revisit to the fusion of their teenage years, heard through the lens of four decades of musical exploration.

String Theory suggests a universe comprised of music, of vibration itself. And serendipity seems a natural outcome of quantum mechanics. If there are eleven dimensions as M Theory proposes, then four or more of them play a role in the uncompromising and naked improvisation of this remarkable and serendipitous group.

“To know the mechanics of the wave is to know the entire secret of nature.”
– Walter Russell

"Layers of sound become music. Our structures evolve and the listener also evolves. Each piece will conform to a meaning that is highly individualized. Every sound or noise is an important moment. The music can be extremely intense, or just so simple that it induces a dream-like state. When performing it feels like an unknown cosmic wave has entered our space. It allows the three of us a freedom of expression that is completely indescribable." - James Day, keyboardist

“Despite our state of the art equipment, the most revolutionary event in the studio was the purchase of -29 db isolation headphones. Before this the acoustic sound of my drums could be heard, with the result that I had to hold back on my volume. With this album that is no longer the case.” - Christopher Brown, drummer/vocalist

During the band members' teenage years their musical heritage expanded to include electric Miles Davis, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Frank Zappa, Roxy Music, Weather Report, Charles Ives, Bela Bartok, Harry Partch and a whole raft of iconoclasts and trail blazers that are too numerous to mention. Scott Hamill (guitar), James Day (keyboards) and Christopher Brown (drums/vocals) attended the same high school and even now live in close proximity. Rock bands, a high school rock opera, and numerous multi-media events preceded the formation of Random Touch. The downturn in the arts and music in the late 1970s set the stage for a nineteen year period of experimentation and play away from the public eye, which in turn set the stage for the fourteen volumes that bring us to the year 2010. Each of these volumes and their individual tracks differ dynamically from one another, a reflection of the invitational and open approach that is the hallmark of this group’s oeuvre.

Reverberating Apparatus will be available at CDBaby.com and randomtouch.com beginning October 15, 2010. More info at www.randomtouch.com.




Bios for Random Touch

Christopher Brown began formal percussion study in 1963. His initial focus was orchestra and band percussion. In 1965 he began drum-set study with jazz drummer and early drum-set pioneer Dick Dickson. By 1967, contemporaneous with his jazz studies, Brown began playing with a series of rock bands. Influences over the next seven years included rock artists such as Frank Zappa and King Crimson, 20th century composers such as Elliot Carter and Morton Subotnick, and jazz luminaries such as Miles Davis and Weather Report. A growing interest in multiple artistic mediums led to the creation in 1975 of the Trusty Wourins Performance Ensemble with a number of fellow musicians. This group utilized projected film and slides, actors, improvised and structured music, as well as traditional, invented and “ready-made” instruments in performances reminiscent of the late 1960’s happenings. Subsequent to Trusty Wourins Brown played with the rock band The Benders and the University of Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He completed a Bachelor’s degree in Film at Chicago’s Columbia College in 1980.

James Day began his formal music education in 1962. He began playing in his first rock band in 1970 as a guitarist. A dramatic and early influence on Day was his introduction to the compositions of Gyorgy Ligeti in Stanley Kurbrick’s 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. In addition to Ligeti, he counts among his early influences Luciano Berio, Igor Stravinsky and Herbie Hancock’s Mwandishi group. By 1972 his interest in 20th century composers led him to begin study of the piano and organ. From 1975 to 1978 he performed with the Trusty Wourins Performance Ensemble on keyboards and synthesizer, and collaborated with Christopher Brown on the group’s films and photographs. In 1976 he began formal composition study with Paul Cochran of the Chicago Conservatory College, followed by study with Robert Hanson, principal conductor of the Elgin Symphony Orchestra. Day’s formal composition and piano study continued through 1981. He returned to rock music in 1978 with The Benders and from 1982 to 1983 played with the rock band Sniper, Sniper.

Scott Hamill taught himself acoustic and electric guitar in the mid-seventies and became guitarist for The Benders in 1978. He counts among his early influences Bill Frisell, Phil Manzanera and Charles Ives. Subsequent to The Benders he played with a number of bands including The Browns.

Matthew Ebbin began videotaping Random Touch performances in 1998. Shortly thereafter he began joining the group for improvised video outings as well as more formal shoots.

For additional information visit www.randomtouch.com.


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