RD Roth & The Issues | Fear Not The Breakdown

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Rock: Roots Rock Folk: Folk Blues Moods: Mood: Brooding
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Fear Not The Breakdown

by RD Roth & The Issues

Having been compared to everyone from Randy Newman to Eleventh Dream Day, you could say that R D and The Issues are a bit eclectic. It would be more accurate to say that they defy easy catagorization. Dreamy, psychedelic rootsy country/blues/folk.
Genre: Rock: Roots Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. The Fiddler
4:26 $0.99
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2. One In A Billion
4:11 $0.99
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3. The Brentwood
4:05 $0.99
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4. Lincoln's Lament
3:51 $0.99
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5. When I Left
3:52 $0.99
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6. Hey All You Hipsters
4:45 $0.99
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7. Ear To The Ground
2:48 $0.99
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8. Eight Ball
3:40 $0.99
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9. Love In The Alley
3:42 $0.99
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10. Robert Ryman Dreams of Curves
2:55 $0.99
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11. Here Comes The Ground
4:34 $0.99
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12. Come Down, Too
2:57 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This is America. This is the place where the influences blur and meld, where horns meet samples, where screaming electric guitars meet the plaintive comfort of the acoustic string on a hollow wooden body.

R D Roth's sophomore release features a newly formed band (Heidi Meredith Bass, Gregg Ostrom Lead Guitar, Jerry King Drums and Percussion), and a roster of guest artists bound to ring bells: David Olney, Janet Beveridge Bean (Freakwater, Eleventh Dream Day, Concertina Wire), Deanna Varagona (Lambchop, Neutral Milk Hotel, etc), Fareed Haque (Sting, Garaj Mahal, etc), Laura Caragher (Slowjane) and Ellis Clark (Epicycle, Chamber Strings, etc) as well as others.

Loaded with catagory resisting style, this disc relies heavily on the value of lyrical story telling, melodic transendence, and sonic atmosphere. This is no acoustic folkie disc.

As much as anything, "Fear Not The Breakdown" is about the problems faced by folks trying to get by - the breakdown of personal relationships (The Fiddler), the breakdown of urban communities (The Brentwood), and so on.

But, being America, this disc ends with hope, as Come Down, Too provides a last ray of light.

Urbane, rhythmic and dynamic. Fear Not.

For fans of Richard Buckner, Radiohead, Paul K, Lambchop, Townes Van Zandt, Eleventh Dream Day...

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Reviews


to write a review

flyin shoes review

A surrealist vision sculpting sound r.d.roth chips away at boundaries..
r.d. roth & the issues

fear not the breakdown




r.d.roth's first disc was reviewed in flyin shoes review as crossing over two worlds - that of texas singer songwriters and the more avant-garde nashville world of lambchop and co. With this his second release that crossover mentality finds ample expression and goes even further across the borders. Roth intones across opening track 'The Fiddler' like Paul K or Steve Wynn and the backing is a murky almost Magazine like 80's type rock over which Deanna Varagonna of afore-mentioned lambchop blows a weird Tuba blues. Spooky and not a little unusual like rest of the disc. Originally a fine art sculptor here roth continues teaching his personal chicago school of surrealism. Electronica feathers out across that tuba...then we're into heavy rock....'One in a billion'...a breathy broke love song.
The lambchop tone floods the third track which sounds like a take on 'House of the rising sun' with Tim Rose singing.
Obviously this no sensitive singer songwriter disc....and no fake country gothic either, Roth has written in flyin shoes review about his friend Paul K and its his dark take on life and superior songwriting that this disc evokes. The ghost of a darker hearted r.e.m. also floats over the soundscapes he constructs....most notably in the distorted blues of 'Lincoln's Lament'. Suddenly a pedal steel floats into view and roth throws off a stark country ballad in 'When I left' a stunning track where the duet voice is that of Eleventh Dream Day/ Freakwater's Janet Bean. Elsewhere David Olney and Varagonna guest...some backing group and a measure of esteem he held in.
'Hey all you hipsters' is a jaundiced view of the seedier side of the music 'biz' sung like Stipe on downers and frankly closer to Aussie rock merchants The Moodists or The Birthday Party than any U.S. model. 'Eight Ball' is a weird distorted voice surreal sketch that suddenly gives out to favourite track 'In The Alley' which closer to Vic Chesnutt's tracks with lambchop and a pure delight with a mock Memphis horns sailing behind the chorus .....like The Three Degrees! A beautifully judged track. A waits scrap and hell it Gary Glitter ...the eclecticism can get confusing...more grunge guitar and dismal mood building and disc ends in a welter of deep purple prose ...' streetlights that look like pins....here comes the ground'....cheerful stuff. In its dark ambience the nearest U.SD. equivalent is darker aspect of Joe Henry and again an artist who crosses over from the country slick to the surreal electroplated blues sound. First disc ended in a faux-medieval 78 sound and same goes for this disc..somewhere off the radar he's crooning in what sounds like next-door's front room.......down home and folksy not really....more like Frank hutchinson's whisky-fuelled nightmare..... When too many discs have no ideas this one strains to contain all the explorations but well worth persevering in taking the trip.

SDB

Flyin Shoes Review
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Shaun Belcher - Flyin Shoes Review

Ex-sculptor builds a up a tapestry of sound on new release...
please use this ammended version thanks :-)

With this his second release roth's crossover mentality finds ample expression and goes even further across the borders. Roth intones across opening track 'The Fiddler' like Paul K or Steve Wynn and the backing is a murky almost Magazine like 80's type rock over which Deanna Varagonna of afore-mentioned lambchop blows a weird baritone sax blues. Spooky and not a little unusual like rest of the disc. Originally a fine art sculptor here roth continues teaching his personal chicago school of surrealism. Electronica feathers out across that tuba...then we're into heavy rock....'One in a billion'...which sounds like a a breathy broke love song but hides deeper layers of meaning regarding abuse of power post 9/11.
The lambchop tone floods the third track which sounds like a take on 'House of the rising sun' with Tim Rose singing.
Obviously this no sensitive singer songwriter disc....and no fake country gothic either, Roth has written in flyin shoes review about his friend Paul K and its his dark take on life and superior songwriting that this disc evokes. The ghost of a darker hearted r.e.m. also floats over the soundscapes he constructs....most notably in the distorted blues of 'Lincoln's Lament'. Suddenly a pedal steel floats into view and roth throws off a stark country ballad in 'When I left' a stunning track where the duet voice is that of Eleventh Dream Day/ Freakwater's Janet Bean. Elsewhere David Olney and Varagonna guest...some backing group and a measure of esteem he held in.
'Hey all you hipsters' is a jaundiced view of the seedier side of the music 'biz' sung like Stipe on downers and frankly closer to Aussie rock merchants The Moodists or The Birthday Party than any U.S. model. 'Eight Ball' is a weird distorted voice surreal sketch that suddenly gives out to favourite track 'In The Alley' which closer to Vic Chesnutt's tracks with lambchop and a pure delight with a mock Memphis horns sailing behind the chorus .....like The Three Degrees! A beautifully judged track. A waits scrap and hell it Gary Glitter ...the eclecticism can get confusing...more grunge guitar and dismal mood building and disc ends in a welter of deep purple prose ...' streetlights that look like pins....here comes the ground'....cheerful stuff. In its dark ambience the nearest U.S.A. equivalent is darker aspects of Joe Henry and again an artist who crosses over from the country slick to the surreal electroplated blues sound. First disc ended in a faux-medieval 78 sound and same goes for this disc..somewhere off the radar he's crooning in what sounds like next-door's front room.......down home and folksy not really....more like Frank Hutchinson's pre-war whisky-fuelled nightmare..... When too many discs have no ideas this one strains to contain all the explorations but well worth persevering in taking the trip.
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Michael Bennett

Ambitious and rewarding
Ambitious soundscapes...great attention to lyrics. Yet he goes well beyond the limits that such a description might indicate. Roth has a flair for the dramatic, befitting his smoky, near baritone voice. He is a master of songs that sound forlorn, brooding and somewhat menacing. While many of Roth’s lyrics create impressions and let you fill in the blanks, he is surgically precise on the scathing ballad “Hey All You Hipsters”, an indictment of slacker trendiness, where goateed Pabst drinking bohos try to find originality in a mixture of irony and pop culture past. What is critical in Roth’s development as an artist is how the music, both in the composition and arrangement, supports the lyrics, both encapsulating and enhancing them. This is a very rewarding piece of work.
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