Various Artists | Lute Ensemble: Stanley Buetens Recordings 1964-1995

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Lute Ensemble: Stanley Buetens Recordings 1964-1995

by Various Artists

Never-before-released versions of Renaissance and Baroque songs with the lute in ensemble; with different types of instruments and voices.
Genre: Classical: Early Music
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Canzona á 8
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
2:12 album only
clip
2. Passemezzo della Rocca el fuso
Stanford Lute Trio
1:54 album only
clip
3. Newman’s Pavin
The Renaissance Duo
1:58 album only
clip
4. Almande “Fortune Alas”
The Renaissance Duo
2:13 album only
clip
5. The King’s Maske
The Renaissance Duo
2:32 album only
clip
6. Alemande
The Renaissance Duo
2:11 album only
clip
7. O Villanella
Quattuor Testudinis
1:33 album only
clip
8. Als ick u vinde
Quattuor Testudinis
1:32 album only
clip
9. Canzona á 3
Stanford Lute Trio
3:47 album only
clip
10. Io vo gridando
Stanford Lute Trio
2:57 album only
clip
11. Donna Crudel
Stanford Lute Trio
2:05 album only
clip
12. Madonna mia pietá
Stanford Lute Trio
2:00 album only
clip
13. Con che soavitá (feat. Kari White)
Stanford Lute Trio
5:31 album only
clip
14. Branles de village
Suzanne Bloch Trio
3:50 album only
clip
15. Consort á 4, Lady Laiton’s Allmaine
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
1:16 album only
clip
16. Consort á 4, The Flatt Pavin
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
1:45 album only
clip
17. Canary
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
1:08 album only
clip
18. En Revenant de St. Nicholas
Quattuor Testudinis
2:08 album only
clip
19. Ballo del Gran Duca
Quattuor Testudinis
2:07 album only
clip
20. Nostra salus, Virginis eximie, Cernere
Suzanne Bloch Trio
1:58 album only
clip
21. S’on me regarde
Suzanne Bloch Trio
1:02 album only
clip
22. Alleluya Psallat
Suzanne Bloch Trio
0:57 album only
clip
23. Der natter schwanz
Suzanne Bloch Trio
2:05 album only
clip
24. Katzenpfote
Suzanne Bloch Trio
1:01 album only
clip
25. Con dolcezza, e piétate alle gioie d’Amore
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
1:56 album only
clip
26. Corilla Danzando Sul Prato
Stanley Buetens Lute Ensemble
1:18 album only
clip
27. Twenty Ways upon the Bells
Stanley Buetens Lute Duet
1:17 album only
clip
28. The Leaves be Green
Stanley Buetens Lute Duet
2:46 album only
clip
29. Dreweries Accord
Stanley Buetens Lute Duet
1:46 album only
clip
30. Se Laura spira
Stanley Buetens Early Opera Group & Stanley Buetens
1:25 album only
clip
31. Non ce che dire
Stanley Buetens Early Opera Group & Stanley Buetens
2:54 album only
clip
32. Mio cor non sospirar
Stanley Buetens Early Opera Group & Susan Strick
4:15 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
| Introduction |
This CD pretty much sums up the life of Stanley Buetens as a lutenist and researcher; the only part of his lute life not represented here is the solo lute concerts with voice he performed extensively. This CD contains a group of pieces very dear to him, the lute in ensemble with other lutes and with different types of instruments and voices. These lute ensembles are rarely heard nowadays due to the difficulty of bringing together the right combination of players who have the necessary technique to perform these rather tricky pieces. For example, players who use the softer thumb-under technique do not mesh with those who use the thumb-out approach. To find lutenists with the advanced technique required is a feat in itself.

Most of the selections on this CD were recorded at Stanford University, where Mr. Buetens taught the lute. The performers were mainly his students of the time and quite willing to experiment with playing this difficult and (at the time) esoteric music. He was never quite sure our recordings would end up being available to the public.

The Suzanne Bloch Trio was active in the 1960s and since that time he treasured these selections. He kept the tapes, hoping someday to be able to publish them. Suzanne Bloch was an extraordinary player and teacher to many future lutenists. She was a true pioneer of the lute in modern times and her impact on lute playing and early music in general cannot be overestimated.

Mr. Buetens died in 2009, long before these recordings could finally be released. Here they are in a digital form for the first time ever! The program notes below were written by Stanley Buetens before he died.

-----------------------------------------

| About the Program |
Track 1, the Canzona by Massaino, is one of the earliest ensemble pieces to designate the specific instruments to be used in the performance. It’s one of the largest, most ambitious pieces of the time. Track 2 is from the earliest published set of lute trios. Pacoloni requires three differently tuned lutes in this rousing setting of a popular piece of the time. The same pieces are set for three citterns in his book, but I have never tried these nor have I heard anybody else do them.

Tracks 3-6 are duets from sources around 1600 and are intriguing and joyous settings of these tunes. The players are Stanley Buetens and Father Martin Mager, lutes.

Numbers 7 and 8 were set for four lutes and four voices in the Pratum Musicum of 1584. This performance by the Quattuor Testudinis uses the four differently tuned lutes but only one voice. I sing the melody and play the highest lute part.
The Canzona by Piccinini for three lutes illustrates the evolution of the form. It is much more extensive and intricate than the Pacoloni. Published in 1623, it is a rather late version of the old-style lute ensemble. The era of the Renaissance lute is coming to a close by this time.
Tracks 10, 11 and 12 are highly ornamented versions for three lutes of well-known madrigals of the late 16th century. This was a common practice and several madrigals were set in many different versions. To contemporary listeners who knew these madrigals intimately it was a very exciting and satisfying musical expression.

Claudio Monteverdi, whom many believe was the first modern composer, included this elaborate setting of the poem “Con che soavitá” in a book of madrigals. It is hardly a madrigal as we think of this form, as the song set for one voice is accompanied by a rather complicated orchestral setting for the time. The original instrumentation is preserved here.

The Branles de village of Besard is a rare and exhilarating piece. It is actually a group of dances as peasants of Besard’s time danced them. This setting for two lutes is also included in Respighi’s Ancient Airs and Dances, suite 3.

The two consorts of track 15 and 16 are actually reconstructions by Stanley Buetens. The solo parts for lute that survived in the Folger MS are designated there as consort parts. The reconstruction added a cittern, pandora, and bass viol.

Track 17 is a short Canary by Besard. The dance form evidently originated in the Canary Islands of Spain, or so the story goes. This lively dance form is found in many countries’ music of the Renaissance.

Numbers 18 and 19 are trios for lutes with two melody instruments. Due to the difficulty of the music and of finding the appropriate instruments (one is a small theorbo tuned an octave higher than the standard lute), this music will probably not become a frequent addition to early music programs.

Numbers 20-24 are Medieval pieces played and sung here by the Suzanne Bloch Trio. These were a very important part of our recitals. Numbers 25 and 26 are early Baroque pieces by that most prolific Frescobaldi, who successfully straddled two periods, the Renaissance and the Baroque.

Track 27 and 28 are popular Elizabethan selections. Suzanne plays the virginals in the first and in the second she plays lute with me. They are found in the Jane Pickering MS in the British Museum. The same is true for Dreweries Accord, played here by Suzanne and Stanley.

The last three pieces are early opera and are here performed with improvisation over the bass line. It’s rare to hear them played in this way but it is closer to the spirit and practice of that time.

-----------------------------------------

Directed by Stanley Buetens and Suzanne Bloch with:
The Stanford Lute Trio (Stanley Buetens, Peter Danner, George Olczak), the Suzanne Bloch Trio (Suzanne Bloch, Margot Ward, Stanley Buetens), Quattuor Testudinis (Stanley Buetens, Peter Danner, George Olczak, Joan Myers), the Renaissance Duo (Stanley Buetens, Father Martin Mager), the Early Opera Group (Kari White, Susan Strick, sopranos; Stanley Buetens, tenor; John Robison, lute; and with the participation of Bill Stevens, Doug Smith, Larry Selman and Jane Johnson).
Mr. Buetens’ lute was made in Brussels, Belgium in 1957 by Raymond Passauro.

-----------------------------------------

| Recording Notes |
The recordings on this album were done in many different rooms, using a variety of different equipment appropriate for each era. Special attention was paid to reducing distracting hum/noise but there are remnants. As most of the master tapes are lost, these will be the best versions of these recordings ever released.

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