Richie Tipton | Basin in the Rock

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Basin in the Rock

by Richie Tipton

Genre: Rock: Album Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Bleeding Heart
3:35 $0.99
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2. Laundromat Heart
4:09 $0.99
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3. War Kills
3:45 $0.99
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4. Gatlinburg
6:33 $0.99
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5. Been and Loved
4:04 $0.99
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6. Beautiful Satan
4:45 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


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Dan MacIntosh

Basin in The Rock
The opening song on Richie Tipton’s release, Basin in the Rock, will stop you in your tracks. Well, at least it should stop you. It’s just that kind of arresting song. At first, you may think it’s a tragic love song; especially when Tipton sings, “If you break my heart I’ll go to pieces, baby.” It sounds pretty much like any other heartbreaking love song, actually, based upon that evidence. It’s sung over a mournful piano rhythm, like something out of a great old Elton John record. The second verse, however, describes how God sent his only Son to die. This was heartbreak of an entirely more universal nature. The track expands to include a weeping electric guitar part. “I’d like to walk away,” Tipton sings at one point, “but somebody moved the road.” This sounds like something Bob Dylan might write. So does the line, “Every thing I know I’m learning twice.” The way Tipton is able to match smart lyricism with passionate performing, in simply magic. It’s easily the best song on the album, so Tipton saves his best, well, for first.
“Bleeding Heart” is followed by “Laundromat Heart,” which tells the story of a man watching his girl get away. He can’t understand, for example, why she sold her Laundromat heart to the first Maytag man to come along. He complains by saying, “Watching my world go spinning around.” He also fills the song with memorable lyrical tidbits, such as “My clothes don’t fit anymore.” Upon first glance, you’d think this whole laundry angle was a silly one. Yet Tipton sings it with such sincerity, it’s unexpectedly moving.
One of the more troubling songs on this release is called “Beautiful Satan.” It begins with Tipton singing, “Satan he wants me.” It goes on to point out all the many evil things Satan does. Tipton sings it as though it were a church song – slow and sincerely. An anti-hymn, perhaps? There is even a choir-like backing vocal section. Tipton sings about wishing he could defeat this pretty looking enemy, but he can’t. This is not a song you’ll ever hear or sing in church. But every true believer has sung something like to themselves. Satan is the foe that’s constantly trying to bring Christians down. No, this is certainly not any fun rocker. “Highway to Hell” by AC/DC, it ain’t. Instead, it’s the sound of a defeated man, headed down the devil’s road against his better judgment and against his will.
The rest of this release may not be as gripping as the three aforementioned songs, but everything on Tipton’s latest is worth a listen for various reasons. “War Kills” has a winning jangling guitar sound to it, mixed with a sort of George Harrison-like melodic vibe. On “Gatlinburg,” Tipton sings a kind of fiddle tune, sadly. For “Been and loved,” Tipton gives us a dramatic ballad about the overwhelming power of being in love.
Basin in the Rock is filled with many wonderful musical nuggets. There’s plenty of variety and undeniable feeling to it. When Tipton sings – sings anything, actually – it comes out vulnerable and extremely urgent. While rock is the general stylistic basis for Basin in the Rock, it sure sounds like a whole lot of country and folk music has been mixed into Tipton’s personal concoction, as well.
There are probably more musical voices singing out – especially with the advent of the internet – than there are ears to hear them out completely. If there is any justice, however, Richie Tipton’s singing and songs should -- much like proverbial cream -- rise to the top. He is truly something special. After listening to these songs numerous times, it’s abundantly clear that Tipton has put a whole lot of blood, sweat and tears into writing and singing his songs. Put simply, Tipton’s an artist to keep an eye on.
Review By: Dan MacIntosh
Rating: 5 Stars (out of 5)
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Review You, Chris MacIntosh

Basin in The Rock
The opening song on Richie Tipton’s release, Basin in the Rock, will stop you in your tracks. Well, at least it should stop you. It’s just that kind of arresting song. At first, you may think it’s a tragic love song; especially when Tipton sings, “If you break my heart I’ll go to pieces, baby.” It sounds pretty much like any other heartbreaking love song, actually, based upon that evidence. It’s sung over a mournful piano rhythm, like something out of a great old Elton John record. The second verse, however, describes how God sent his only Son to die. This was heartbreak of an entirely more universal nature. The track expands to include a weeping electric guitar part. “I’d like to walk away,” Tipton sings at one point, “but somebody moved the road.” This sounds like something Bob Dylan might write. So does the line, “Every thing I know I’m learning twice.” The way Tipton is able to match smart lyricism with passionate performing, in simply magic. It’s easily the best song on the album,
Read more...