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Riggy Rackin | Nautical Pastoral and Pub Song

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United States - California - SF

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Folk: Traditional Folk Folk: Celtic Folk Moods: Type: Vocal
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Nautical Pastoral and Pub Song

by Riggy Rackin

A collection of English Folksongs that sailors, farmers and drinkers have enjoyed for centuries.
Genre: Folk: Traditional Folk
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Wave Over Wave
3:01 $0.99
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2. 23rd of March
1:51 $0.99
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3. Bold Jack
2:50 $0.99
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4. Liverpool Packet
2:31 $0.99
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5. Rosabella
2:07 $0.99
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6. Spanish Ladies
2:11 $0.99
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7. One More Day
3:03 $0.99
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8. Good Fish Chowder
2:19 $0.99
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9. Steeleye Span
2:35 $0.99
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10. Curragh of Kildare
3:11 $0.99
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11. Brooms
2:29 $0.99
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12. Home Lads Home
5:09 $0.99
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13. Felton Lonin
2:49 $0.99
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14. It's Not yet Day
3:19 $0.99
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15. John Barleycorn
3:11 $0.99
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16. Blann's Good Ale
2:22 $0.99
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17. Stayin' Out All Night
3:09 $0.99
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18. Was You Ever See
1:35 $0.99
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19. Merry Merry Be
2:20 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
It was The Beatles' fault. They came along when bar mitzvah lessons had ceased, making room for music lessons, and demonstrated how to make girls scream. They made a different kind of music, with neat baroque chords and words that mattered. They first made the English really cool to me. My dad had set me up to be receptive to their message, bringing me to his favorite Greenwich Village haunts, with coffee and guitars and other folks who spoke words that mattered. My first guitar teacher, Bream-devotee David Harris, sprang from that same milieu, and instilled an appreciation for those modes not found in doo-wop and blues. Soon I was playing Scarlatti and thumbing through the more obscure record bins on 8th St and in the Folklore Center. And it was those special records that brought me to England a few years later. But the line was a fairly straight one.

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