Robert Richmond | Song for Leonard

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Rock: Adult Contemporary World: Native American Moods: Type: Political
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Song for Leonard

by Robert Richmond

Benefit Single for the International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee
Genre: Rock: Adult Contemporary
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Song for Leonard (feat. John Trudell)
3:19 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THIS RECORDINGS GO TO THE ILPDF.

Robert Richmond is a songwriter, artist and activist who has long supported the ILPDC and the efforts to free Leonard Peltier.

John Trudell was a Native-American poet and activist with a long history in support of Native rights causes

Vocal, Guitar, Organ, Piano-Robert Richmond
Drums: Ron Zilli
Bass: Jem Targal
Backing Vocals: JD
PRODUCED BY ROBERT RICHMOND
A TWO GOOD REASONS MUSIC PRODUCTION
Blessings: BMI, Annie Casale (Legal), Peter Clark, Buddha Miller, Cree Miller & Ana Ruiz

DEDICATED TO JIM BOYD

Native American activist Leonard Peltier has spent over 40 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. Prosecutors and federal agents manufactured evidence against him (including the so-called “murder weapon”); hid proof of his innocence; presented false testimony obtained through torturous interrogation techniques; ignored court orders; and lied to the jury. People are commonly set free due to a single constitutional violation, but Peltier—innocent and faced with a staggering number of constitutional violations—has yet to receive equal justice.

Eligible since 1986, Peltier is long overdue for parole. The U.S. Parole Commission has yielded to the objections of the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in denying Peltier’s applications for parole at every turn—most recently in 2009 when he was told he will not receive another full parole hearing until 2024 when, if he survives, he will have reached nearly the age of 80 years. From the time of Peltier’s conviction in 1977 until the mid-1990s—according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, DOJ—the average length of imprisonment served for homicide in the United States ranged from 94 to 99.8 months (about 8 years) prior to being released on parole. Mr. Peltier has the right to equal justice, i.e., application of the existing standards at the time of his conviction. Even if you were to take Peltier’s two consecutive life sentences into account, it is clear that Peltier should have been released a long time ago. Instead, according to 1977 standards, he has served the equivalent of over five life sentences. Further, in determining his release date, the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) also has failed to take into account Mr. Peltier’s time in prison prior to his conviction in 1977 (over one year), as well as the good-time credit (20 years total, to date) earned. Instead, the BOP has consistently stated that Mr. Peltier presumptive release date is October 11, 2040.

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