Robin O'Brien | The Empty Bowl

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Recommended if You Like
Laura Nyro Liz Phair Lucinda Williams

Other Genres You Will Love
Rock: Folk Rock Folk: like Joni Moods: Mood: Dreamy
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The Empty Bowl

by Robin O'Brien

A dark, inviting dreamscape about romantic yearning. Twelve new songs from an indie veteran often compared to Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams and Liz Phair.
Genre: Rock: Folk Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Deep Blue
2:06 $0.99
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2. Gold
3:08 $0.99
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3. The Lavender Sky
4:31 $0.99
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4. Anime
3:44 $0.99
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5. Water Street
3:27 $0.99
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6. Stranger
5:11 $0.99
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7. The Weave
0:59 $0.99
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8. There's Somebody Else in My Soul
3:33 $0.99
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9. Kathy
2:54 $0.99
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10. Suffering
2:54 $0.99
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11. Sad Songs
2:47 $0.99
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12. Foolsgold
3:42 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The Empty Bowl is filled with sumptuous textures and colors that wave nostalgically to mid-Sixties pop (such as Revolver, Burt Bacharach, and Glen Campbell’s “Wichita Lineman”) as O'Brien follows her muse into the here and now. A song cycle about romantic hunger, The Empty Bowl moves like a roller coaster through obsession, elation, frustration, and sometimes even terror (as in, “There’s Somebody Else in My Soul”). Like a taoist glimpse of unity, these moments reveal and contradict each other—the 3 a.m. confusion of “Suffering” against the sunshine euphoria of “Water Street,” the “fall in love without you” surrender of “Anime” awoken by the phone call, the conversation, or the expected glance that never comes. It’s all there at once, like a still-life glowing with a quiet light of understanding, the kind that comes only to artists like O’Brien for whom life, dreams, art, and music are one and the same.

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