Rosa Lamoreaux & Daniel Swenberg | Evening Serenade

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Elizabeth Schwarzkopf Franz Schubert Mozart

More Artists From
United States - Washington DC

Other Genres You Will Love
Classical: Art songs Classical: Chamber Music Moods: Type: Lyrical
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Evening Serenade

by Rosa Lamoreaux & Daniel Swenberg

Beautiful and unusual Songs with guitar, violin, cello and harpsichord 1760-1840. Rarely performed or recorded.
Genre: Classical: Art songs
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Buy 2 or more of this title's physical copies and get 20% off
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. From Three Arias from Mozart's Don Giovanni Arranged Fernando Sor, Vedrai Carino, K. 527 (feat. Daniel Swenberg)
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:54 $0.99
clip
2. From Songs for Guitar, Voice and Violin, Op. 37, No. 6, Musette Imitée De L'espagnol (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson)
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:53 $0.99
clip
3. Komm, Liebe Zither Komm, K.351 (Arr. Anthon Diabelli) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:06 $0.99
clip
4. From Songs for Guitar and Voice, Op. 37, No. 5, Invocation À La Nuit (feat. Daniel Swenberg)
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:50 $0.99
clip
5. Divertamento on a Theme from the Grand Trio of Mozart, K. 304 Minuet in E Minor (Arr. Pierre-Jean Porro) [feat. Leah Nelson, Loretta O'Sullivan]
Daniel Swenberg
5:51 $0.99
clip
6. From Six Romances Nouvelles, Op. 34, No. 3 L'amour Marchand De Coeurs (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson)
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:18 $0.99
clip
7. Die Zufriedenheit, K. 473 (Arr. Anthon Diabelli) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:04 $0.99
clip
8. Abendempfindung, K. 523 (feat. Daniel Swenberg)
Rosa Lamoreaux
5:21 $0.99
clip
9. From Lieder Der Liebe Und Zärtlichkein Op. 98, No. 7, Huldigung (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson)
Rosa Lamoreaux
1:27 $0.99
clip
10. From Lieder Der Liebe Und Zärtlichkein Op. 98, No. 3, Die Entfernte Geliebte (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson)
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:31 $0.99
clip
11. From Lieder Der Liebe Und Zärtlichkein Op. 98, No. 6, Zum Nahmensfeste Einer Schönen (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson)
Rosa Lamoreaux
1:22 $0.99
clip
12. From III. Recueil De Brunettes, Psyché (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson, Loretta O'Sullivan, Andrew Appel)
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:56 $0.99
clip
13. From III. Recueil De Brunettes, Amarillis (feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson, Loretta O'Sullivan, Andrew Appel)
Rosa Lamoreaux
5:34 $0.99
clip
14. Bararolle, D. 774, Op. 72 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg, Leah Nelson]
Rosa Lamoreaux
4:02 $0.99
clip
15. Sérénade Op. 957, No. 4 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
4:57 $0.99
clip
16. Waltz Number 1 in G Major for Guitar and Violin (Arr. Anthon Diabelli) [feat. Leah Nelson]
Daniel Swenberg
0:49 $0.99
clip
17. Ständchen, D. 889 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
1:50 $0.99
clip
18. Schlaflied (Schlummerlied), Op. 24, No. 2, D. 527 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:32 $0.99
clip
19. Das Fischermädchen Op. 957, No. 10 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
2:23 $0.99
clip
20. Die Nacht, D. 534 (From the Collection of Baron Von Schlecta) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:55 $0.99
clip
21. Nachtstück, D. 672 (Arr. Napoléon Coste) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
4:41 $0.99
clip
22. Prelude for Guitar in D Minor, Op. 38, No. 3 (Arr. Napoléon Coste)
Daniel Swenberg
1:32 $0.99
clip
23. Romanze Aus Rosamunde, Op. 26, D. 797: (From the Collection of Baron Von Schlecta) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:39 $0.99
clip
24. Liebesbotschaft Op. 957, No. 1 (Arr. Johann Kaspar Mertz) [feat. Daniel Swenberg]
Rosa Lamoreaux
3:57 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes

A few years ago, after an impromptu performance of some Mozart songs, Rosa and I began musing and scheming about a recording. In my enthusiasm for the project I offered hundreds of ideas: music by unknown or rarely heard composers, utilizing a variety of period instruments associated with the several epochs/countries. To my surprise, she looked through it all. We strove to find a balance of known and unknown, emphasizing variety. The resulting program alternates between Paris and Vienna, spanning the late Baroque/Rococo, Classical, and Romantic eras: c.1760-1845. Despite the disparate times and place, there are a few elements that connect and unify it: the guitar (in its many historical manifestations), the themes of the evening, night, and serenades, and lastly, the connections that can be drawn from each composer/arranger to the next.

From the cantatilles of DeLaGarde, to the Schubert arrangements of Coste, every selection in this recording features guitar accompaniment. The guitar was an extremely popular instrument for accompanying songs. It was highly esteemed for its portable nature; at home in the highly-cultured salons of Paris, but unrivaled in the open air--for an evening serenade, or on one of the many outings Schubert is known to have enjoyed (many featuring guitar and violin dances as depicted in Mohn's painting: Ballspiel in Atzenbrugg). We begin with the 5- course baroque guitar (a course implies double-stringing, though it can also refer to a single string-- in this case: 4 doubled courses and 1 single top string, or chanterelle). In the late 18th century, there were many proponents arguing for single stringing on the (baroque) guitar; it creates a stronger, clearer tone in keeping with the simpler textures and arpeggios common to the early Classical period. While the 6-string guitar had been invented in Italy and Germany, the French retained a fondness for the 5-string variety until the second decade of the 19th century. With the arrival of Carulli and then Sor the 6-string guitar became the standard instrument, though 7 and 8 stringed guitars were also known. This recording features all the varieties of guitar known during this period of transition: 5-course, 5-string, 6-string and 8-string guitars, copies of instruments by French and Viennese makers.

In France, the last quarter of the 18th century was one of profound upheaval and change, not only politically, but particularly for musicians and for the guitar itself. Just as the ancien regime was overturned by the new Republic, the 5-course baroque was transformed into the 6-string guitar. However, in the case of guitars, necks and heads were altered, not so much chopped off... Musicians’ lives also changed; one could no longer depend on a royal appointment. While a composer like De LaGarde enjoyed royal patronage, guitarists like Porro, Sor, and Coste would earn their living by publishing, teaching, and partaking of the enthusiastic world of the salon.

The Cantatilles and Brunettes (songs usually about young shepherdesses with dark hair) of Pierre de LaGarde offer a glimpse into the last years of the baroque guitar. Their landscapes and pastoral subjects present a charming and carefree, if idealized world--suffused with golden light as the sun was about to set on an era. The guitar parts, distinct from the basso continuo, were notated in tablature in the typical manner of guitar and lute.

Born in 1750, in provincial southern France, Pierre-Jean Porre Italianized his name to Porro and moved to Paris in 1783. Porro began publishing a series of very successful journals, such as the Journal de Guitarre. These journals and pedagogical methods disseminated and popularized a variety of songs, transcriptions, solos, and chamber music to a world of guitar-crazed music-lovers, both professionals and amateurs, throughout France. From 1750-1831, Porro's life, career, and the variety of guitars he knew bridges the transition from the old guitar to new--from pastoral brunettes & musettes to Mozart : from 5 courses, to 6 strings.

While Mozart needs no introduction, our recital casts a new light on some familiar material. Porro's Grand Trio is an arrangement for guitar, violin and cello of Mozart's sonata for violin in e minor K. 304, which the composer wrote 1778 while traveling from Mannheim to Paris. Porro's arrangement is surprising. He gives the guitar much of Mozart’s original violin part, creating the new violin part from the piano's right hand. Fernando Sor was among the leading figures in the next phase of the guitar, Guitaromanie, the craze that swept through Europe in the first 40 years of the 19th century. Sor arranged three arias from Mozart's Don Giovanni, one of which is the lovely Vedrai Carino. The orchestral reduction heard in the guitar part well illustrates Sor's fascination with harmony and voice-leading, getting the most out of the instrument. The two mandolin songs are performed here on a copy of a baroque (c.1770s) mandolino with 6 double-courses, plucked with the fingers instead of a plectrum--although they were likely conceived for the Neapolitan mandolin. As in the guitar world, the mandolin world was going through a period of experimentation and change with many different types and families coexisting and vying for supremacy.

Anton Diabelli was a prolific publisher and composer in early 19th-century Vienna. He was the first to publish Schubert's songs, in the 1820s. Many were published simultaneously, or in a few cases, first, as guitar songs. In his series Philomel, Diabelli arranged or found other guitarists to adapt accompaniments to the newly popular 6-string guitar (Guitaromanie had spread to Vienna, as well). Along with Diabelli’s arrangements of Schubert songs and waltzes, we have included three songs of his own composition: they could be performed as guitar songs, but also with an additional part for flute or violin, as we do.

One could hardly overstate the enthusiasm for Schubert in France--his music caused a sensation. The singers Nourrit (introduced to Schubert’s songs by Liszt) and Wartel cultivated and evangelized Schubert's songs throughout the concert halls and salons of Paris, and beyond --going as far as to perform Schubert in French translation in Vienna (very well-received). Schubert's drama, harmonies, intensity, poetic sadness, and gift for melody were a revelation to the French, and would alter the course of French song thereafter. In the 1830s, the publisher Richault, entering an agreement with Diabelli, was the first to bring Schubert's songs to a wildly enthusiastic French public --he was also the first to attempt to publish a complete edition of Schubert's songs. These editions were all issued with French translations by Bélanger (most likely the poet: Béranger). Richault responded to the demand for guitar music by entrusting Napoléon Coste to arrange a dozen or so of Schubert's accompaniments. Coste's arrangements are wonderful adaptations for the guitar; charming and sonorous, faithful to the original accompaniments, while adapting harmonies and keys to better suit the idiomatic needs and qualities of the guitar.

Alongside Coste's and Diabelli's arrangements of Schubert, we have included a slightly later setting by Viennese guitar virtuoso J K Mertz (Liebesbotschaft). The settings of Rosamunde and Die Nacht are from a manuscript of Schubert's friend and poet, Baron Von Schlecta. Die Nacht exists only in this collection, although it shares a text with another, very different setting. Collected for years and dated 20 years after the composer's death, this manuscript offers yet another reason for hearing Schubert's music accompanied by the guitar, as was common in Biedermeier Europe.

“It is three years now since his songs first appeared among us, but it is only in the last few months that his name has become known outside the circle of his admirers ... Schubert is a genius ... is one of those fortunate creators who add new strings to the lyre of the heart”
■ Ernest Legouvé Revue et gazette musicale de Paris – 1837

Daniel Swenberg

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review