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Rosie Carlino | What Matters Most

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official website

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United States - Pennsylvania

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Jazz: Jazz Vocals Easy Listening: Adult contemporary Moods: Type: Vocal
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What Matters Most

by Rosie Carlino

According to Jazzreivew.com's Susan Frances, Rosie's vocals have the seductive allure reflective of Lena Horne and Dinah Shore. Her voice has tones that pour out like liquid caramel.
Genre: Jazz: Jazz Vocals
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. More In Love
4:07 $0.99
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2. Talk To Me
3:24 $0.99
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3. Wave
3:28 $0.99
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4. Love Like Ours
4:25 $0.99
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5. You'll See
4:16 $0.99
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6. If It's the Last Thing I Do
2:57 $0.99
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7. Don't Go To Strangers
3:18 $0.99
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8. If Only For A Moment
3:56 $0.99
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9. I Was Telling Him About You
3:37 $0.99
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10. Is It Over Yet?
3:44 $0.99
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11. Heartache
4:08 $0.99
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12. Who's Sorry Now
3:08 $0.99
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13. If I Love Again
3:37 $0.99
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14. What Matters Most
3:00 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Rosie’s Backstory


I grew up in Pennsylvania in what was then a little town called Blue Bell.
I am the youngest of eight children from an Italian-Irish home.

From my earliest recollections, all I ever wanted to do was sing. So I did -- from morning to night sharing my days with a small pony named Lollipop.

We’d spend our days wandering the fields and woods and neighborhoods of Blue Bell, and I would sing him all of my favorite songs. (Lollipop might have had his favorites, but he never shared them with me.) I sang songs like The Shadow of Your Smile, Who Can I Turn To, What Kind of Fool Am I, and Don’t Rain on My Parade --great songs, great times.

My whole family loved to sing. My Dad and mother were both singers, and we all shared in their love of music. We sang in the evenings around the piano with my mom at the keys; we sang doing dishes; we sang at family gatherings. It gave us so much joy and kept the family connected while the natural stress of seven siblings took it’s toll.

My dad would bring home songs for us to listen to --songs by Sinatra, Dean Martin, Jimmy Durante, Eydie Gorme, and Vikki Carr. It was always such a treat to see my dad come up the walk with an album in his hand.

When I was about 12, my mother arranged for me to study voice lessons with a woman who shared my unusual first name, Rosina. I thought it was very special. Rosina taught me the beginning techniques and lifelong joy of singing.

One evening in the spring of my eighth grade year my mother told me I had a vocal scholarship audition to an area high school. Wow, this was great.

I won that scholarship, and it changed my life. I went to high school and sang and sang. I felt so free. I actually met my husband in my junior year. But as I moved closer to graduation and what I knew was my opportunity to pursue my one and only dream, my father decided that the pursuit of a singing career was not what he wanted for his youngest daughter.

What a blow for me. I could never have crossed my very strong-willed Italian father at that age, and I didn’t. To make sure I didn’t, I developed a throat issue that kept me from singing until I was in my thirties and well into my own family.

As I moved forward in my twenties, I looked at other areas of life that might prove interesting. I married my high school sweetheart. I went to Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School and became an administrative assistant working for some wonderful people. But it surely wasn’t for me. I kept looking. I received my Real Estate license. That wasn’t it. I read the phone book hoping something else would spark my soul. Nothing did.

I attended a variety of colleges trying out any and every direction I hadn’t ventured before. I studied communications, home economics, sewing, fashion design, flower arranging, horticulture and landscape design. Then I became pregnant with my first daughter, so I put school aside for a while.

After my second daughter was born, I continued to look for the thing that would replace music in my life. My only outlet at this point for singing was for my children in the evenings. What a joy it was to sing, to share, and to be heard.

I always taught my children that they could and should try a bit of everything so they would know what made their own hearts sing. I shared all my pursuits with them, I was never afraid to try something new. I felt that if someone else could do it, then so could I.

I collected large stones for our gardens; mowed the field for the ponies. I kept exploring. I dabbled in pottery, and taught the girls to throw pots and bowls and plates. I learned weaving and spinning, knitting and embroidery and taught them the workings of the wheel and the sensitivities of the wools. I pursued painting and woodworking and filled our home with both my and my children’s creations. Then with eleven great years as a mother under my belt, I decided I’d go to art school. But again it wasn’t meant for me. I became pregnant with my son.

What a change in my late thirties to start again with a baby. It was both wonderful and challenging. I was filled again with the wonder of a baby and quickly made aware of how much less energy I had to chase him around. But I did it and he flourished.

The children taught me so much about myself. Not only did their personal exploration into friendships, fashion, personal style, and life change their lives, it awakened me too.

As my oldest daughter prepared to leave for college I knew it was time -- time for me to sing again. I could no longer teach my children to follow their hearts when I wasn’t doing it for myself.

So I began to sing again – both with my voice and in my heart. As I came out of my warm and safe cocoon, I began my journey of inviting more of the world into my life through my music.

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