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Sarah Manning | House on Eddy Street

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Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz Jazz: Post-Bop Moods: Featuring Saxophone
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House on Eddy Street

by Sarah Manning

"Sarah Manning can swing as naturally as she breathes...an enlivening presence in the new generation of jazz makers. Manning plays - and writes - in what is unmistakably her own voice." - Nat Hentoff
Genre: Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Musashi
7:59 $0.99
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2. Habersham Street
9:16 $0.99
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3. Of Lions and Mailboxes
5:50 $0.99
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4. Powell Street Yowl
10:10 $0.99
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5. House on Eddy Street
9:56 $0.99
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6. Zooey
0:47 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Alto saxophonist Sarah Manning has been described as an iconoclast. Not one to take things simply as they are, her development has been shaped by the search for an individual sound and has led her down strange and difficult paths. The result, House on Eddy Street, is a self-produced first album of original music, with Randy Porter (piano), John Wiitala (bass) and Akira Tana (drums).

In the words of Nat Hentoff, "Manning plays - and writes - in what is unmistakably her own voice."

Manning was born in Torrington, Connecticut. As a teenager at Hartford's Artist Collective, a school founded by Jackie McLean, she played with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Greene in a combo coached by trombonist Steve Davis.

Manning attended Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan, on a scholarship; and after graduation, she was accepted into the distinguished jazz studies program at William Paterson College in New Jersey, directed by bassist Rufus Reid. Later in Massachusetts, she studied with Dr. Yusef Lateef.

In addition to stints as a sideman and bandleader, Manning has performed frequently in the most public venue of them all - the street. Frustrated with her music, she took her horn via Greyhound bus from New York all the way to San Francisco, where she played on the street for eleven days and paid for her trip by busking for change. Without a rhythm-section, and trampled upon by tourists and businessmen, Manning began to develop the edginess and determination she displays today.

Several years after that bus trip to San Francisco, Manning packed up the U-Haul and the cat, and once again headed west. Today she resides in Berkeley, California.

House on Eddy Street marks the arrival of an important new voice in jazz whose singular quest for identity is evident in a sound that is at once bold and compelling.

"Manning has what I look and hope for in any form of expression - the pulse of life, the life force. And in music - the use of space, of dynamics, to keep the stories moving ... The music that lasts stays in the mind and emotions of the listener, connecting with his or her own memories and desires, and so the stories are always still going somewhere. Sarah Manning creates that kind of music."
-Nat Hentoff

Excerpts from the liner notes by Nat Hentoff for
House on Eddy Street


This is the first album by alto saxophonist and composer Sarah Manning. It will not be her last. Hearing her playing, her composing, and the resonance of the stories she tells, brought to mind what the late Booker Little - a trumpet player and composer whom I had the privilege of recording for Candid Records more than 40 years ago, told me:

"My own feelings about the direction in which jazz should go are that there should be much less stress on technical exhibitionism and much more on emotional content - on what might be termed humanity in music - and the freedom to say all that you want to."

As you'll hear, Sarah Manning can swing as naturally as she breathes, but what also makes her an enlivening presence in the new generation of jazz makers - she is 27 - is the depth and ease with which she illuminates ballads.

Here, on "Habersham Street", and the searching "House on Eddy Street", among other intimately melodic passages in this set, Manning plays - and writes - in what is unmistakably her own voice. When I asked her for some of her influences, she, of course, cited musicians with their own signature sounds - among them, Jackie McLean, Andrew Hill, Larry Young, Wayne Shorter (especially his composing) and someone with whom I had many late-night conversations about keeping and developing one's own voice - Woody Shaw.

Listening to this album should clearly illuminate [her] merits. Not only the resiliently personal sound of her alto playing but the continually evocative forms, inner voicings, and storytelling of her compositions and arrangements throughout this set.

Sarah Manning has what I look and hope for in any form of expression - the pulse of life, the life force. And in music - the use of space, of dynamics, to keep the stories moving. I once wrote of Booker Little that he was "a strongly self-disciplined creator of forms that follow his own inner feelings. There is in his work as player and composer a stimulating combination of sense and sensibility, clarity and daring." Sarah Manning is on that route.

The music that lasts stays in the mind and emotions of the listener, connecting with his or her own memories and desires, and so the stories are always still going somewhere. Sarah Manning creates that kind of music, and I am very pleased that she asked me to do the notes for her first album.

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Reviews


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DAL NYC

A Charismatic New Jazz Voice
I imagine that many wise and wonderful things will be said about Sarah and her music throughout her career, and I am honored to help kick it off by saying: Like Bird and other masters, Sarah genuinely speaks through her instrument; and what she has to say is well worth hearing. A fantastic and delightful debut by a true master in the making! Mucho congrats Sarah!
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a.k. watanabe

bay area's newest star
her melody is good as gold, and her performance shines like diamond! sarah is a new queen of the bay area's jazz community!!!
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Ed Goodstein

Wow-- amazing debut
I can't add much to Nat Henthoff's comments. This album shows amazing maturity for a debut by a young
artist IMO. Great distinctive alto & fine interplay with
the group too. I guess I esp. like "Powell St. Yowl," but it all is terrific. And fine trio-- pianist Randy Porter one
of the best on the West Coast (well, really USA!), and
adds a lot, Wiitala & Tana creative rhythm section. Great group, articulate jazz with attitude AND heart.
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