Various California Songwriters | The Canvas Remembers September 11

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Pop: Folky Pop Folk: Folk Pop Moods: Type: Tributes
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The Canvas Remembers September 11

by Various California Songwriters

A collection of powerful songs inspired by September 11 written by California songwriters chosen by music industry professionals. All proceeds to charity.
Genre: Pop: Folky Pop
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. eleventh of september, natasha miller (alameda)
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2. red white and blue, austin willacy (san francisco)
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3. you never know, wendy beckerman (el sobrante)
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4. world trembles, brad wilcox (los angeles)
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5. they traded the world, stacy kray(san francisco)
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6. i was born an hour ago, neil rutman (altadena)
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7. born 9/11/85, linda hirschhorn (oakland)
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8. where eagles dare (ken kingsbury/eric weiss (san francisco/los a
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9. alive, think of england (los angeles)
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10. world interrupted, paul manousos (alameda)
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11. september 13, john o'brien (san francisco)
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12. dark days, lynn bobby (richmond)
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13. build a bridge, glass house (oakland)
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14. the super bad report, kc bowman (oakland)
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"The Canvas Remembers September 11" is a collection of powerful songs inspired by the events of September 11, 2001 written by California musicians, and chosen from among many submissions to the project by a group of music industry professionals. These songs also were performed at an artist tribute (which included art and poetry as well) held at the Canvas Cafe in San Francisco on the first anniversary of September 11. Additional concerts were held at the Coffee Gallery Backstage in Altadena, and Hear Music in Berkeley.

This CD highlights the healing power of the arts, and raises money for two programs that benefit inner-city children and the arts in New York City: Free Arts For Abused Children, NYC and Midori & Friends. 100% OF THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THIS CD ($15) WILL BE DONATED TO THESE TWO CHARITIES.

The sale of this CD was made possible through the unbelievably generous sponsorship of Disc Makers, a CD replicator with offices in both NYC and the Bay Area, which mastered, designed and manufactured the CD, and CD Baby, which donated its distribution services. What this means is that every cent of the purchase price will go to charity, without recoupment by the organizers of any costs.

You can listen to the songs by clicking on the song title at the left.

CRITICAL REVIEWS:

"To raise money for charities that benefit inner-city children and the arts in New York City, Stacy Kray sent out a call to her fellow California singer-songwriters and put together an engaging collection of songs inspired by the events of September 11, 2001. This compilation captures the spectrum of emotions-the sadness and apprehension as well as the hope and rejuvenation-that came in the aftermath of that day. From the mournful sound of bagpipes playing "Amazing Grace" at the close of Natasha Miller's heartbreaking opening track to the uplifting chorus of "Alive" by Think of England, what's most impressive on this disc is how the songwriters have turned a sorrowful subject into something comforting and cathartic."

---Drew Pearce, Acoustic Guitar Magazine

"The 14 tracks constitute a valuable variety of lyrical reactions to a single historical focus, as well as a variety of singer/songwriter styles . . . . KC Bowman, for example, delivers "The Super Bad Report" with the oddly effective flower-power stride of an early '70's pop tune, while the group Glass House makes use of African instrumentation and syncopation to advise that we "Build a Bride." Ken Kingsbury and Eric Weiss's "Where Eagles Dare" is made from some of the images carried through the media to California. Other songs deal less directly but no less emotionally with the remains of the day. Linda Hirschhorn's a cappella, beautifully arranged "Born 9/11/85" addresses her daughter's fateful 16th birthday: "I wish I could keep you safe as you sleep/ Give you a world unbroken and whole," Hirschhorn sings, and she insists that "You and I must reclaim/That sudden fierce day as our own." Natasha Miller, whose words are introduced by bagpipes and drums, imagines a dialogue between a son ("I didn't know when you tucked me in/That I'd never get to hug you again") and his father, one of the disaster's victims ("Tell your momma I'll be all right/Turn off the tv and play outside."). In one of the most moving of many fine sets of lyrics, John O'Brien, accompanied by acoustic guitar, sings evocatively about "Calling from an airplane to home. . . Calling from the border of Pakistan, calling out . . . Calling for peace upon earth/ Calling for faith and rebirth." In a wraith-like voice, Austin Willacy moans, "I'm blue red and white but mostly blue."

---- Jeff Kaliss, Marin Commuter Times

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Reviews


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Jim Haile

A beautiful, moving tribute
I remember some professor in college telling me that artists were the ‘antennae of society’, with special sensitivities to ontological ‘vibrations’ rippling through our culture. He said their job was to use their gifts to translate these wavelets into an art form with which we all could understand and identify.
Stacy Kray is a San Francisco musician/producer who has collected 14 original songs from California independent songwriters focusing on their experiences and feelings surrounding the events of September 11, 2001. She has succeeded in creating a stunning, moving tribute to those who perished, those who became heroes and those they left behind. And in doing so, she’s helped us all identify with the conflicting, confusing feelings and anxiety we’ve all felt since then.

This work baits you from the start with the haunting bagpipes, snare and ostinato piano of Natasha Miller’s ‘Eleventh of September”, sets the hook with Austin Willacy’s beautiful ‘red, white and blue’ and Wendy Beckman’s “You never know”, lands you on the boat with Kray’s own, “They traded the World” and knocks you out with the unusual, contra-prosody of “The Super Bad Report” by KC Bowman.

The CD is as varied as all our experiences of that day. But one thing is sure; listening to this CD captures the feel of that time far better watching CNN or reading a newspaper. Buy this incredible CD.
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Stone Holmes



The music on the record achieves an artistic sensibility in matching the deep pain of victims with the sympathy of distant observers. Through intensely personal stories of raw emotional experience, breakout performances by unknown artists make you wonder what else they’ve done. The pain is so real you almost feel bad loving the music.

Opening with a striking funereal bagpipe intro, Natasha Miller’s Eleventh of September speaks from the voice of a child who has lost his father, set against a jagged piano melody evocative of Tori Amos’ best work. Austin Willacy’s Red White and Blue showcases a brilliant vocal talent, some deft fret work, and rich lyricism (“I’m blue, red and white but mostly blue”), while Brad Wilcox’s World Trembles has an instantly accessible acoustic guitar rhythm and a killer hook. Lines like “Illusions we shed like burned skin/ As we stand on the edge looking in” from Stacy Kray’s own contribution They Traded The World, capture the feelings of many Americans frightened by their own complacency.

Like Picasso’s Guernica, artwork inspired by tragedy is sometimes hard to look at. But the songs on this record, with their unflinching examination of loss, compel you to listen and, more importantly, think. Isn’t that what art is all about?
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