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The Silent Senders | Haven't you heard?

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Rock: Instrumental Rock Electronic: Soundscapes Moods: Featuring Guitar
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Haven't you heard?

by The Silent Senders

The new frontier of the electronic instrumental rock, an alternative soundtrack for visionary stories.
Genre: Rock: Instrumental Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Haven't you heard?
6:04 $0.99
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2. I wish I had words
5:37 $0.99
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3. Keep waiting for Klaus
5:21 $0.99
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4. Walking without a sound
5:31 $0.99
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5. Dayz
4:36 $0.99
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6. Crack the whip!
3:47 $0.99
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7. Don't touch our souls
4:20 $0.99
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8. Everyday miracle
4:12 $0.99
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9. Friends or foes?
5:31 $0.99
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10. see Me, hear Me (Domina)
6:24 $0.99
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11. Hardly my fault if your life's going downhill
6:01 $0.99
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12. To be continued...
8:14 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This second album by TSS in a step forward of this musical project, after the eponymous début album in 2002.
The two "senders" are Maurizio Duka Moroni (music, piano and electronics, production and sound engineering), supported by Paolo "Dr. Phibes" Caucci (guitars).

Again we find short musical stories (the texts in the booklet are merely a thematic reference), and "Haven't you heard?" throws us in front of a cinema screen, where complex sound collages are projected, producing new sensations and involving the audience each time they listen to the CD.
Maurizio Duka Moroni, among other things, has been working in cinema for years, as composer and sound engineer, which explains the atmosphere and style that are a characteristic of the tracks.

It's always very hard to stick labels on music, both for unavoidable personal involving and the bent for simplifying too much what, by choice, wants to be an open matter. That's why The Silent Senders take advantage to the end of the analogic roughness and sound, of the tridimensional dynamic of sampled sounds, of the hyperrealism of the electric guitar and of all a rising tide of hardly recognizable timbres, took under control with notable mastery.
A close sequence of visionary and fanciful musical meanders (at last, after such dried indie and lo-fi sounds) to such rich surroundings and atmospheres, imaginatevely conceived.

The Silent Senders' "Haven't you heard?" is rich in new hints, between rock and electronic handling, lisergic trip and soundtrack, explosive energy projection and imaginary vision and, thanks to their performance skills, the authors work out refined movement strategies to describe what they see through the lenses of their vivid imagination.

It can be listened in two different ways, as an “accompaniment” CD, to listen in every moment of day, while you’re in the car, in the underground, using your vacuum cleaner (but take my advise, turn up the volume), at work, during a boring class, during a space mission (how many times have you been floating in space with nothing to listen?), under the shower or jogging.

It’s perfect, in every circumstance, because you have every feeling there: euphory, melancholy, suspence, relaxation, it really could be the soundtrack of every moment of your life; the alternative, a most-sacred one, is considering this CD a work of art. One of those works in which passion, accuracy in the composition and extreme, almost maniacal care for the slightest details, are evident and make everything perfect: from the titles to the artwork, for that note more, for that pause less, for the heat released, freezing your veins, because it’s, in effect, wisely produced, in a way that the slightest sound comes out surprisingly brilliant, even in that sea of sounds that conquers us in the middle of a track.

So, as you would do in front of a Degas exposed in a museum, you want to enjoy it throughly; you wouldn’t take a quick look at it while passing by, you would stop, you would take a closer look, observing the strokes of the brush, the pression on the canvas, you would try to understand the choice of the colours, their depth, how they match together, how they react to reflected light and, once back home, thinking again about it, you would like to go back there and enjoy new details, that you could find out at every new observation, and experiencing it more consciously.

In the same way, you often go back with "Haven’t you heard?", to listen again to a track, to understand better a concept, to enjoy a riff, a sound, a pause, every time discovering something we hadn’t noticed before, so you go back again, and again, and again there’s something else. Something we like more and more.So that’s why it’s better to have two copies of it, by listening to it again and again, a thousand times, the CD is done for.

The only difference is that you have to pay the ticket to see a Degas, every single time you want to see it, while you buy The Silent Senders' "Haven't you heard?" once. It’s like having a Degas at home...

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Reviews


to write a review

Marco Benevento

A close listening
Haven’t you heard is one of those cds it’s better having in two copies. At least it was better for me. Yes, because it has two sides.

No, stop, don’t turn it over!

I didn’t say it was “recorded both sides”, I said it has two sides: meaning it can be listened in two different ways, as an “accompaniment” CD, to listen in every moment of day, while you’re in the car, in the underground, using your vacuum cleaner (but take my advise, turn up the volume), at work, during a boring class, during a space mission (how many times have you been floating in space with nothing to listen?), under the shower or jogging.

It’s perfect, in every circumstance, because you have every feeling there: euphory, melancholy, suspence, relaxation, it really could be the soundtrack of every moment of your life; the alternative, a most-sacred one, is considering TSS2 (alias the silent senders 2), a work of art.
One of those works in which passion, accuracy in the composition and extreme, almost maniacal care for the slightest details, are evident and make everything perfect: from the titles to the artwork, for that note more, for that pause less, for the heat released, freezing your veins, because it’s, in effect, wisely produced, in a way that the slightest sound comes out surprisingly brilliant, even in that sea of sounds that conquers us in the middle of a track.

So, as you would do in front of a Degas exposed in a museum, you want to enjoy it throughly; you wouldn’t take a quick look at it while passing by, you would stop, you would take a closer look, observing the strokes of the brush, the pression on the canvas, you would try to understand the choice of the colours, their depth, how they match together, how they react to reflected light and, once back home, thinking again about it, you would like to go back there and enjoy new details, that you could find out at every new observation, and experiencing it more consciously.

In the same way, you often go back with Haven’t you heard?, to listen again to a track, to understand better a concept, to enjoy a riff, a sound, a pause, every time discovering something we hadn’t noticed before, so you go back again, and again, and again there’s something else. Something we like more and more.So that’s why it’s better to have two copies of it, by listening to it again and again, a thousand times, the CD is done for.
The only difference is that you have to pay the ticket to see a Degas, every single time you want to see it, while you buy TSS once. It’s like having a Degas at home.

Ok, now do me a favour, take it down from the wall. By now I know thoroughly the Silent Senders picture gallery, so I’ll be your guide. I’ll lead you through the album, describing every track.
Please, this way. Don’t push. No photos, thanks. Sorry? Restrooms are over there, between tracks 6 and 7.

Ok, we start from track number one:

Haven’t you heard
After a short industrial-ambient intro, with metal drops falling around us, Duka and Dr. Phibes (in the world Maurizio Moroni,  Synthetic-Orchestra Conductor, and Paolo Caucci, Master of the six strings) are ready to turn off the light and plunge us in a very dark atmosphere, almost horror, with a slow drum loop emerging from darkness, silhouetted against that sinister pad the leading theme articulates on, played with a synth-chimes at the beginnign, then reprised and extended, by Phibes’ electric guitar, joining us for the six minutes (and more) lenght of the track. It almost sounds like an ouverture, every while and then new parenthetis open, for example planning on a nice piano riff, that brings a light ray, also reprised and developped later by other instruments. And then again a pause, we taje a breath, and agin we go with the leading theme, flatter, firmer, with guitar stopped-riffm, powerful, soundig nu-metal, and an harp answering.And then the track stops and starts again, and a new theme starts, a new developpment of the theme, a long chase, a hint for a little low strings guitar-solo. Towards the 4’ 40’’ an acid synth-bass opens a new door on the leading theme (that’s my favourite part) with the stopped guitar riff introduced by groups of four long notes (which remind me of Michael Denner of the recent Mercyful Fate). You feel that the track is about to end but it surprises you with another whim. And as you take for granted that it will never end, it ends. This is nasty.

I wish I had words
The second track starts with something like a siren. A piano plays, there’s something like a radio somewhere in the background; voices, interferences which create some anxiety, then the piano, with the bass, make of this strange siren a melody, and the track starts, with a rhythmic and sustained sequence of notes, not forseeable at all. Just as you ask yourself: “What will Caucci work out here?”, you realize that he had already snaked in with an unsuspicious and light effect, becoming bitter, creating a pad a solo synth will develop on, with a distorted guitar. It sounds almost dance, reminding  the atmosphere of the ‘80’s, because of certain riffs, the virtual instruments and the samples. Evocative, beautiful, in particular at the minute 3:40, as an arpeggetto enters, and beautiful is the guitar solo, short and simple. Listen to this track and breathe it deeply because it’s full of surprises, of ideas. That’s another present by the generous Silent Senders: a constant inspiration. They’re a sort of musical Tower of Babel.

Keep waiting for Klaus
Number three. A symphony of sound effects: crickets, a clock beeping and beeping and beeping again, time going by, a lot of time going by (there’s a reason for this title, something concerning a character which was about to to cross path with the silent senders. I have it at heart because, in some way, I’m a bit “Klaus” too... but that’s another story). So, there’s a fine bass riff (the essence of misterious klaus himself), with the guitar going along and then, a nice synth harmonizing, and then another one, and another one, in a crescendo of excitement. But, instead of exploding, the melody soothens with a light and nice 5/4. As usual TSS like to amaze us. The riff in “keep waiting for klaus” is the most “persistent” one in all the cd, which is appropriate, considering the meaning (if you knew klaus’ story you would understand). And it’s evident thet our friends did have a lot of fun with it, and so do we.

Walk without a sound
We are delaing with a thriller here. Suspence is immediately peceptible, at the first breath before the first note. We are in a restaurant, an open-air restaurant probably, and we see through a man’s eye. A man which is obeserving without being observed, and walks without a sound. A razor blade speaks for him. As usual, in the booklet you’ll find some fascinsting litterary “sketches” by MS. Reading them before listening will help you see much more things.Back to the music: there’s a dramatic and solemn choir, joined by a lofty guitar opening the gates of this track, charachterized by a long prologue; as the track breaks out, with an accelerating drum, a sustained 4/4, with a scratching guitar and an echo of double octaves played by the piano. The choice of distorsions and guitar effects is really scrupulous. In particular in this track. I wonder, listening to this drum skillfully programmed by Duka Moroni, how would have sounded like if it was a real drum, and I loose myself in the idea of a TSS concert.

Dayz
Shyly poking our heads through this track (second best in my personal top five TSS) and we are in front of a piano, almost jazz style, followed by a solo. Again the ‘80s atmosphere, early ‘80s. Dayz is the ideal song to leave with a lump in one’s throat, or with a tear rolling down the face inside the crash-helmet while on your motor-cycle. It’s perfect.And then, surprise surprise, a classic guitar! Who would have gussed? Just, twenty seconds from the end? Just twenty seconds??? Well, what can I say, they’re like that.

Crack the whip
We are almost at the end of the first part. Track six, as it starts, suggests a science-fiction surround, we’re on a flying machine, under the rain, eating sashimi bought in that kiosk in Kingston Kitchen, in a novel by P.K.Dick. But don’t be deceived, in a flash everything gets topsyturvy and here we are, darting on Route 66, joined by a “cow boy” guitar. Agitated beat, inciting theme, it would fit for a race scene. Why don’t you try?

Don’t touch our souls
Now that you’re in jail you have all the time to listen to track number 7, which is a breath of fresh air for me: it really puts me in a good mood. There’s enough life there to feel alive.This track should be listened at high volume, with the right implant (clearly the same should be done for all the cd). I listened to it, for the first time, in Audiosfera studios.  You couldn’t imagine how that studio sounds, nor what it contains: I can. I was there. I saw. I saw things you, human beings couldn’t imagine. But you can listen. So enjoy this gorgeous Virus (by saying Virus I mean Virus, not a plug-in).There’s no comparison with the previous CD. The more I listen the more I realize: Haven’t you heard? Is such a symphony of brain-waves and there’s so much in it that you will feel full. So full, from the acoustic point of vue, that hearing your door-bell ringing could make you sick.

Everyday miracle
We wake up at the dawn of this track with a guitar twangling. Such a sweet and optimistic awakening. A long, beneficent breath. It’s impossible for me not to be moved by the synth solo, how it’s played, what it says, in particular for the good choice of the effect: I’m very critical towards the synth solos (often used in prog metal, for example), because they are mostly really cold and showy. This sound is warm and elegant instead. As a drum starts, at 2’ 40’’ I smile: beautyful. This track is really beautyful. I don’t think there are more words to say.

Friends or foes
A thunder shakes us unprepared, and send us to our places with a bad mark.A piano riff, and then a guitar, almost tuning a rondò. Here’s the third place of my Top Five. This track, analyzing its score, makes me conscious that TSS are above all great instrumentalists. They give you theimpression that they are playing blind-folded. Good the stop&go, good the tempo as they start again. The only dark spot of thi track is that towards the end you will be beside yourselves, once you get to know thw cd, knowing that next track is coming:

see Me, hear Me (Domina)
After the first click of a camera, in the intro of this splendid suite we perceive, with a thread of a voice, what we’ll discover is the leading theme. Then a synth-bass riff enters, reminding the best Depeche Mode, that female voice making everything so misterious and sensula, and tha piano to complete this masterwork. Yes, it’s the best track of TSS, I’m not exaggerating by admitting that.
Every second a piece is added to the puzzle, a little piece that makes it more precious, inflates it and stuffs it. It’s very likely you’re going to play it again immediately.The vocoding on that phrase is exciting (the third minute of the track), and tell me what you hear next doesn’t sound like the breathe in I want you now (talking about Depeche Mode)... As the sound webtale hardens, it’s swept away by Paolo Caucci’s powerful six-chords axe, with that soo and those screams that give you the creep. Then some things happen, that make you wring your hands: a lyric singer’s voice and a groove of Bali percussions (or something similar); and then, as nothing, here we are: another page, another chapter, and other things cooking. Exaggerate! See me hear me isn’t short, but trust me if I say it ends too soon.

Hardly my fault if your life's going downhill
We’re listening to a dialogue between two girls and one of them, I’d l ike to bash my notebook on her teeth. It’s just as well TSS distract us with a nice track, that seems not to start though, ever. Come on, come on, and the track starts, finally. Not exactly in an overwelming way, but interesting. This track (I had to say it sooner or later) is the less exciting for me (maybe it’s those two girls’ fault). However I like the two keyboards leimotiv and the funky guitar (minute 3.20) As the track ends, here again the two silly geese, and here my notebook takes flight.

To be continued
Alas, suddenly we’re at the end titles of this cd. I wonder if this track had this title while it was being composed already. In effect it’s exactly what it sounds like: an ending track, which doesn’t end for good. A veil of melancholy but a nice, positive feeling also: as if they said, we’ve enjoyed ourselves see you soon. Here, more than anywhere else in the cd, there are some amusing dialogues between guitar and keyboards. Thrust and parry, provocations and duets. Amusing, amused above all.

And suddenly something happens, incredible: it really ends! No, it can’t be… the cd ends.
But TSS always have a surprise for all their devoted fans: This time they sent you a parcel with a red ribbon: in exchange give them just a few seconds patience. They are worth it.
I don’t need anything more to conclude that, in this cd, TSS have surpassed themselves and exceeded my expectations, which were quite great.
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