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Steel Pennies | Rusty Zinc-Coated Bluegrass Music

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Bill Monroe Steve Earle

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United States - Colorado

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Country: Bluegrass Folk: String Band Moods: Type: Acoustic
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Rusty Zinc-Coated Bluegrass Music

by Steel Pennies

Steel Pennies plays hard-driving bluegrass flavored with original and traditional sounds, spiced with a touch of humor, and seasoned with high lonesome vocal harmonies.
Genre: Country: Bluegrass
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Ready? Okay, Wait!
0:18 album only
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2. Don't Neglect the Rose
2:36 $0.99
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3. Girl Behind the Bar
2:30 $0.99
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4. He Died a Rounder At 21
3:49 $0.99
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5. Old Dangerfield
4:09 $0.99
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6. Pennsylvania Dream
2:59 $0.99
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7. I Shot Your Dog
2:24 $0.99
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8. Colorado Coal Train
2:52 $0.99
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9. Last Train from Poor Valley
3:34 $0.99
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10. Banjo Signal
2:00 $0.99
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11. Time On My Hands
2:19 $0.99
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12. One New Road
3:28 $0.99
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13. True Life Blues
2:40 $0.99
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14. Texs Eagle
3:08 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Steel Pennies, purveyors of rusty, zinc-coated music, is a five-piece bluegrass band featuring lead and harmony singing accompanied by banjo, guitar, mandolin, and bass. We play a rousing mix of original and traditional bluegrass tunes, and we’re not above throwing in some old country and honky-tonk when the crowd gets rowdy! The hard-driving, high-lonesome, sound of the Steel Pennies harkens back to the heyday of bluegrass music.

Rusty Zinc-Coated Bluegrass Music is the title of our debut CD, and it features 14 toe-tapping tunes, including five originals. Songs are:

Ready? Okay, Wait! - A short original tune featuring a very short recitation, created on the spur of the moment by the Steel Pennies.

Don’t Neglect the Rose – A beautiful song by Emma Smith, sung beautifully by Kathy (Tater) Drazsnzak, with four-part harmonies on the chorus.

Girl Behind the Bar – Also called The Wayside Tavern, by Carter Stanley; this is as traditional as bluegrass gets: the tavern girl gets killed by her jilted lover; the innocent man goes to prison. We perform it as a duet sung by David Okay Patton and Kathy Drazsnzak.

He Died a Rounder at 21 – A great bluesy song by Jimmie Skinner that the Ol’ Wheel Hoss (Darrell Cox) moans to perfection. We let Kevin Slick channel his inner Duane Allman on this one. It’s as cool as the other side of the pillow.

Old Dangerfield – A driving Bill Monroe tune, that the Ol’ Wheel Hoss just rips up – if this one don’t light your fire, then your wood is all wet!

Pennsylvania Dream - by Kevin Slick. Who said that “home” in bluegrass songs has to be in the South? Kevin waxes for his mountain home in Pennsylvania, with plenty of harmony support from Kathy Drazsnzak, Darrell Cox, and David Okay Patton.

I Shot Your Dog – a classic “trailergrass” song by Fred Eaglesmith. Tater brings the perfect combination of Patsy Cline and Courtney Love to this (not exactly) gritty vignette about what it’s really like living in the country.

Colorado Coal Train – by David Okay Patton. Rumor has it that David was trying to beat the train at a crossing when the inspiration for this song struck.

Last Train from Poor Valley – a beautiful slow song written by Norman Blake. You can hear the tears in Kevin’s voice on this one.

Banjo Signal – a bouncy instrumental written by Don Reno and Red Smiley. We’re in and out of it in two minutes flat.

Time on My Hands – by David Okay Patton. A righteous, angry woman bluegrass song, sung with conviction by Kathy Drazsnzak. Don’t mess with this woman!

One New Road – Another great original by Kevin Slick. You’ll be singing along on the chorus by the second verse!

True Life Blues – a classic Bill Monroe song, warning women to think twice before saying “I do.” Kathy Drazsnzak sings this with the authenticity that only a married woman can bring to the song!

Texas Eagle – Steve Earle’s great train song–this one moves like a locomotive with Darrell Cox stoking the firebox. We had to put this one last, ’cause there’s nothing can follow it!

The Steel Pennies are:
· David Okay Patton, MC, banjo, lead and harmony vocals. David originally hails from the bluegrass state of Kentucky, and has been performing in Colorado since 2000. Prior to joining Steel Pennies, David played in Coal Creek Bluegrass Band. In 2007, David was inducted into the Colorado Bluegrass Music Association Hall of Honor. Off stage, Dave enjoys tinkering with old radios and sipping old bourbon.

· Kathy Foster-Patton, Upright bass. A western Kentucky native, Kathy has been writing about and playing bluegrass music for over seven years. She founded the Steel Pennies in 2007. In addition to laying down a rock-solid rhythm, Kathy is an avid writer and gardener. She hopes to one day become a beekeeper.

· Darrell Cox, Mandolin, lead and harmony vocals. Darrell grew up in Kansas listening to old country music tunes. As he grew to embrace bluegrass, he was influenced by the likes of Bill Monroe, John Moore, and Ricky Skaggs. He and his wife grow all manner of livestock on their small farm outside of Denver.

· Kathy Drazsnzak, Guitar, lead and harmony vocals. Kathy grew up outside of Chicago, but it wasn’t until she moved to Colorado that she began to sing and play music. She plays with many of the talented musicians who live in Lyons and also loves to bike in her spare time.

· Kevin Slick, Guitar, lead and harmony vocals. Since 1985 Kevin Slick has been recording and performing an amazing array of music. His original tunes combine the best of traditional roots with contemporary creativity. His life was forever changed when he went to a Flatt and Scruggs show at the age of 8.

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