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Streeton Trio | Andrew Anderson: Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart"

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Classical: Chamber Music Classical: Chamber Music Moods: Instrumental
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Andrew Anderson: Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart"

by Streeton Trio

Commissioned by the Streeton Trio in 2013 from Australian composer Andrew Anderson, the nickname "The Heart" comes from the beating accompaniment rhythm in the middle of the slow Religioso movement.
Genre: Classical: Chamber Music
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart": I. Drammatico
8:42 album only
clip
2. Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart": II. Religioso
6:00 album only
clip
3. Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart": III. Poco agitato
4:17 album only
clip
4. Piano Trio in E Minor "The Heart": IV. Inquieto
9:07 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The four-movement Piano Trio in E minor - "The Heart" - was written for the Streeton Trio in 2013. The opening Drammatico movement is in sonata form, with an extended development over which the principal theme progressively shifts by a beat, finally coming full cycle when the recapitulation section arrives. Religioso is a contemplative movement of hope. The restless Poco Agitato movement generally proceeds in hushed tones, only occasionally breaking into loud outbursts. In the final movement - Inquieto - the feeling of restlessness continues although now in a more dramatic fashion, tempered by a lyrical and optomistic second subject. The principal theme from the opening movement returns as a tranquil coda that ultimately banishes this restlessness and closes the work. In a similar fashion to the nicknames assigned to many of Haydn's symphonies, the name for "The Heart" comes from a particular musical figuration in the work - in this case, the beating accompaniment rhythm in the middle of the slow Religioso movement - rather than from a particular programme or story associated with the piece.

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