Temple University Wind Symphony & Emily Threinen | Wind Concerti

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Wind Concerti

by Temple University Wind Symphony & Emily Threinen

Soloists from The Philadelphia Orchestra and faculty from the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University perform with the Temple University Wind Symphony under the direction of Emily Threinen.
Genre: Classical: Concerto
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Concerto No. 1 for Solo Trumpet & Large Brass Ensemble: I. Adagio - Allegro moderato
Temple University Wind Symphony & David Bilger
4:27 $0.99
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2. Concerto No. 1 for Solo Trumpet & Large Brass Ensemble: II. Andante
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Bilger & Emily Threinen
4:33 $1.29
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3. Concerto No. 1 for Solo Trumpet & Large Brass Ensemble: III. Allegro I
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Bilger & Emily Threinen
2:28 $1.29
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4. Concerto No. 1 for Solo Trumpet & Large Brass Ensemble: IV. Allegro II
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Bilger & Emily Threinen
6:10 $1.29
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5. The Shadow of Sirius, Concerto for Flute & Wind Orchestra: I. The Nomad Flute
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Cramer & Emily Threinen
4:47 $1.29
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6. The Shadow of Sirius, Concerto for Flute & Wind Orchestra: II. Eye of Shadow
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Cramer & Emily Threinen
8:33 $1.29
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7. The Shadow of Sirius, Concerto for Flute & Wind Orchestra: III. Into the Clouds
Temple University Wind Symphony, David Cramer & Emily Threinen
9:11 $1.29
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8. Concerto for Bass Trombone: I. Brisk and Flowing
Temple University Wind Symphony, Blair Bollinger & Emily Threinen
6:58 $1.29
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9. Concerto for Bass Trombone: II. Slow and Singing
Temple University Wind Symphony, Blair Bollinger & Emily Threinen
9:14 $1.29
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10. Concerto for Bass Trombone: III. Fast and Declamatory
Temple University Wind Symphony, Blair Bollinger & Emily Threinen
7:38 $1.29
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11. Oboe Concerto (For Solo Oboe & Wind Ensemble)
Temple University Wind Symphony, Jonathan Blumenfeld & Emily Threinen
17:34 $3.99
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12. Desert Roads, Four Songs for Clarinet & Wind Ensemble: I. Desert Roads
Temple University Wind Symphony, Ricardo Morales & Emily Threinen
7:12 $1.29
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13. Desert Roads, Four Songs for Clarinet & Wind Ensemble: II. Soliloquy - Not Knowing
Temple University Wind Symphony, Ricardo Morales & Emily Threinen
3:35 $1.29
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14. Desert Roads, Four Songs for Clarinet & Wind Ensemble: III. Coming Home
Temple University Wind Symphony, Ricardo Morales & Emily Threinen
11:42 $1.29
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15. Desert Roads, Four Songs for Clarinet & Wind Ensemble: IV. Pray for Tender Voices in the Darkness
Temple University Wind Symphony, Ricardo Morales & Emily Threinen
7:01 $1.29
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16. Carbon Paper and Nitrogen Ink, Concerto for Marimba & Wind Ensemble: I. Spiral Threads of Vital Spirit
Temple University Wind Symphony, Phillip O'Banion & Emily Threinen
5:52 $1.29
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17. Carbon Paper and Nitrogen Ink, Concerto for Marimba & Wind Ensemble: II. Glowing
Temple University Wind Symphony, Phillip O'Banion & Emily Threinen
7:03 $1.29
clip
18. Carbon Paper and Nitrogen Ink, Concerto for Marimba & Wind Ensemble: III. On the Fabric of the Human Body
Temple University Wind Symphony, Phillip O'Banion & Emily Threinen
7:35 $1.29
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
From Robert T. Stroker: Producer/Dean/Vice Provost for the Arts at Temple University -
The Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University is proud to present this recording collaboration between the Temple University Wind Symphony and soloists from The Philadelphia Orchestra and Boyer faculty.

The Boyer College has enjoyed a long and fruitful history with The Philadelphia Orchestra – many members of which are on our faculty. The talented students in the TU Wind Symphony are a testament to the quality of all Boyer faculty.

A special thanks to Phillip O’Banion, Ricardo Morales, David Cramer, Jonathan Blumenfeld, David Bilger and Blair Bollinger for taking time to work with our students. Thank you also to Dr. Emily Threinen for spearheading this exciting project.

From Emily Threinen, conductor, Temple University Wind Symphony:
Philadelphia is a historic city that attracts some of the best musicians in the world. It is home to the Philadelphia Orchestra, Opera Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Ballet, and many other art, performance, and educational establishments. Temple University is located just one mile north of Center City, Philadelphia, and many faculty members of Temple are professional performers in the city. The opportunity to study with professional musicians is one of the main attractions for students who enroll in the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University.
The inspiration behind this wind concerti project was to showcase the talent of two music organizations—The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Wind Symphony of the Boyer College of Music and Dance. I wanted the students in the Wind Symphony to intimately experience working with incredible faculty and I wanted the faculty soloists to be featured on wind concerti with the student ensemble. Each of the six concerti is an original work composed for the solo instrument with a brass ensemble or wind ensemble accompaniment. No piece is a transcription or adaptation.
The two-year collaboration was remarkable. Students learned incredible skills working with these solo artists. We hope you enjoy the final product!
Leopold Stokowski said, “I believe that music can be an inspirational force in all our lives—that its eloquence and the depth of its meaning are all important, and that all personal considerations concerning musicians and public are relatively unimportant—that music comes from the heart and returns to the heart—that music is a spontaneous, impulsive expression—that its range is without limit—that music is forever growing—and that music can be one element to help us build a new conception of life in which the madness and cruelty of wars will be replaced by a simple understanding of the brotherhood of man.”


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