Terence Blacker | Sometimes Your Face Don't Fit

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Jacques Brel Jake Thackray Tom Lehrer

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UK - England - East

Other Genres You Will Love
Folk: Singer/Songwriter Easy Listening: Adult contemporary Moods: Mood: Funny
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Sometimes Your Face Don't Fit

by Terence Blacker

His second album confirms Blacker's place in the funny, acerbic tradition of Jake Thackray, Tom Lehrer and Jacques Brel. ‘A clever songwriter, social satirist and bittersweet romantic.' Independent
Genre: Folk: Singer/Songwriter
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Young Girl With a Ukulele
3:43 $0.99
clip
2. Sometimes Your Face Don't Fit
4:23 $0.99
clip
3. Family History
5:03 $0.99
clip
4. Spring Warning
3:49 $0.99
clip
5. Would You Love Me If I Were Brazilian?
3:15 $0.99
clip
6. Too Much Information
4:14 $0.99
clip
7. You're On Your Own
0:59 $0.99
clip
8. Eastbound Train
4:50 $0.99
clip
9. My Village
4:47 $0.99
clip
10. Slap-Happy
5:05 $0.99
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11. Something Happened At Christmas
4:46 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Terence Blacker's themes are as wide as surprising as life itself. A song about a girl with a ukulele can take a sudden dark turn while a Brazilian bossa nova can turn out to be all about the pain of being English. His songs can have a universal message - after all, sometimes your face don't fit - but can also be perceptive, funny and revealing short stories in song.
'There’s a pleasing bite behind the melodies.' Alice Jones, Independent.
'Blacker’s songs confirm him as a man for tricksy rhymes and a pleasingly mournful middle-aged scepticism (think Jacques Brel meets Tom Lehrer).’ Libby Purves, The Times.

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