The Bifurcators | Like a Bird in the Wilderness (feat. "Blue" Gene Tyranny)

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
David Tudor John Cage

More Artists From
United States - California

Other Genres You Will Love
Avant Garde: Electro-Acoustic Avant Garde: Structured Improvisation Moods: Featuring Piano
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Like a Bird in the Wilderness (feat. "Blue" Gene Tyranny)

by The Bifurcators

"Like A Bird In The Wilderness" was originally inspired by Wallace Stevens' poem "Of Mere Being" (1955) and written specifically for pianist and composer "Blue" Gene Tyranny.
Genre: Avant Garde: Electro-Acoustic
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Buy 2 or more of this title's physical copies and get 20% off
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
1. Like a Bird in the Wilderness (Feat. "Blue" Gene Tyranny)
38:00 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.


Album Notes
"Like A Bird In The Wilderness" was written with "Blue" Gene Tyranny's playing style and sense of musical structure in mind. We asked him to improvise on five related note-rows in sequence, but also asked him to feel free to depart from those rows as he saw fit. The computer-driven system that listened to and accompanied him was programmed for those rows, and much of it would respond only when he played on the specified note row of the moment. Some other parts would record his musical gestures and then re-insert them into the piece, often modified, at a later time, while other parts listened to his playing and made new note rows and chords from that information, and still other parts played predetermined notes and chords that would play even if "Blue" did nothing at all. This was mostly accomplished with a large number of simple MAX patchers running on two computers, which in turn played the several synths and samplers accompanying "Blue".



to write a review