Various Artists | The Chip Deffaa Songbook

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The Chip Deffaa Songbook

by Various Artists

Theater songs of ASCAP award-winning writer Chip Deffaa, from such shows of his as "The Seven Little Foys," "Theater Boys," "Song-and-Dance Kids," "George M. Cohan Tonight!," and "Mad About the Boy," performed by an all-star cast.....
Genre: Easy Listening: Show Tunes
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. A Few Words from Miss Channing
Miss Channing
0:14 $0.99
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2. All-American Sweetheart
Matthew Nardozzi & Emily Bordonaro
2:09 $0.99
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3. I'm Crazy for My Baby in a Uniform
John Brady
2:13 $0.99
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4. Struttin'
Beth Bartley
2:50 $0.99
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5. An Eddie Foy Soft-Shoe
Michael Townsend Wright
2:00 $0.99
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6. I Won't Be an Actor No More
Jon Peterson
1:31 $0.99
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7. I'm in Love with One of the Stars / Did Ya Ever Have One of Those Days?
Emily Bordonaro & Giuseppe Bausilio
2:35 $0.99
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8. A Song for Mother
Seth Sikes
2:21 $0.99
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9. My Father Told Me
Jon Peterson
1:22 $0.99
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10. Horse Race
The George M. Cohan Revue Ensemble
1:10 $0.99
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11. Hats off to You
Jon Peterson & Lynelle Johnson
1:02 $0.99
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12. An Ode to Popularity
Bailey Cummings & Jonah Barricklo
1:18 $0.99
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13. Faith
Michael Townsend Wright & The Song-and-Dance Kids
3:40 $0.99
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14. Someday
Michael Townsend Wright & The Seven Little Foys
1:51 $0.99
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15. Please Wait for Me, Miss Leacock
Maxwell Beer
2:19 $0.99
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16. Sometimes I Miss New Rochelle
Bailey Cummings & The Foys Kids
2:40 $0.99
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17. One More Christmas (Finale Reprise)
Seven Little Foys Ensemble
2:03 $0.99
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18. Under the Chilliwack Moon
Seth Sikes
1:10 $0.99
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19. Lavergne Sequence
Chip Deffaa & The Song-and-Dance Kids Company
3:19 $0.99
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20. Chilliwack Reprise
Seth Sikes
2:39 $0.99
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21. Magnetic Waterbury
Bailey Cummings
1:28 $0.99
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22. A Hymn to Chilliwack
David Brian Colbert
5:29 $0.99
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23. Sidekick
Toby Medlyn & Cody Jordan
6:56 $0.99
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24. You Need to Be Loved to Be Happy
John Brady, Katherine Paulsen & Al Roths
4:28 $0.99
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25. A Stage-Door Kind of Love
Alec Deland & Gabriella Green
10:13 $0.99
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26. Miss Channing Reminds Us
Miss Channing
0:13 $0.99
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27. For the Theater
Keith Anderson & Seth Sikes
8:36 $0.99
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28. Opening-Night Party
Philip Louis Calabro
6:20 $0.99
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29. Liz Smith
Ricky Schroeder
3:53 $0.99
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30. Sweet Tea / Somebody's Baby
Jonah Mayor, David Cronin & Tyler Duboys
3:38 $0.99
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31. Ex-Gay
Toby Medlyn & Cody Jordan
3:13 $0.99
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32. When Love Grows Cold
Joris De Graaf
9:36 $0.99
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33. Crater Lake Blues
Seth Sikes & Clark Kinkade
8:30 $0.99
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34. Tell Me Why / Back in Kokomo
Keith Anderson & Santinp Fontana
9:14 $0.99
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35. Did Ya Ever Have One of Those Days?
Jon Peterson
1:06 $0.99
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36. I Won't Be an Actor No More (Reprise)
Beth Bartley
1:37 $0.99
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37. Struttin' (Reprise)
Michael Townsend Wright & The Seven Little Foys
2:39 $0.99
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38. All-American Sweetheart (Reprise)
Jon Peterson
2:02 $0.99
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39. Someday (Finale Reprise)
The Seven Little Foys Ensemble
1:42 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
NOTES FROM CHIP DEFFAA...

I often think I’m the luckiest guy on Earth. Not just because I get to do work I love–creating and directing shows, and producing albums–but because I get to work with wonderfully talented people I love. And on this album you’ll hear some of those wonderfully talented folk, singing with zest songs that I wrote or co-wrote.

These are theater songs, written for shows I’ve created over the years (all of which are available for licensing). I’ve gotten requests for an album like this from fans of my shows; from theater companies that have mounted productions of my shows; and from performers who’ve appeared in my shows or have asked if they could sing my songs in their own acts. I’m very grateful to all who’ve asked for this album. And to all who’ve worked on my shows, or have taken the time to record for me over the years. I feel very lucky. And very blessed.

Because these recordings were made, over the years, in different studios and with different recording engineers, audio quality may vary somewhat from track to track–but not the quality of the performances, which is the main thing. We have some wonderfully talented people on this album. I feel like it’s a kind of all-star concert, or a dream vaudeville bill, with so many performers I love.

* * *

WHAT YOU’LL HEAR ON THIS ALBUM.... DISC ONE...

1. “A FEW WORDS FROM MISS CHANNING....” Before we hear the songs themselves, this album begins with a few spoken words from my favorite person in show business, Miss Carol Channing. Oh, she’s not just one of the greatest musical-comedy stars I’ve ever seen on stage, she’s also been a valued friend and source of inspiration for a quarter-century. I’ve learned more from her than from anyone else in the business.

When I mounted my musical comedy “Theater Boys” at New York’s 13th Street Theater, she was kind enough to record for me lines which were heard–like the voice of an oracle--every night during our run at the theater, and were heard, too, on our cast album. (And this Broadway legend did that from the heart, gratis; that’s one of the greatest gifts anyone’s ever given me.)

I’m glad to be able to open this “Chip Deffaa Songbook” album with a bit of her wisdom, which is always worth hearing again. She reminds us, in that inimitable voice of hers, that we are all “wired for love.” And that’s a perfect introduction for this album, since so many of the songs I’ve written deal with love in one form or another... perhaps the love of a guy for a gal, or of a guy for a guy, or love of family, or of home, or of the theater.... And Carol Channing’s voice has so much love in it–wonderful woman!--she sets just the right tone....

2. “ALL-AMERICAN SWEETHEART” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan and Deffaa) is one of my favorites, out of all the songs I’ve ever written or co-written–a jaunty reflection on the cycle of life, which I began writing when I was 17. (The song has my lyrics, with a melody based upon a George M. Cohan instrumental.) The song’s evolved in the years since I was 17, but the opening lines have never changed. The song took its final form when I adapted it for my musical play, “George M. Cohan Tonight!” The one-and-only Jon Peterson introduced it in our original Off-Broadway production at the Irish Repertory Theater in New York City, in 2006, and sang it on the cast album. And since then, for more than a decade off-and-on, he has successfully performed the show–and this song–all across the US and abroad. We will hear a fine solo rendition by Peterson himself later on in this album. But I originally conceived this song as a duet, and that’s the way we’re going to hear it now.

This new recording of “All-American Sweetheart” features two of my favorite younger performers, who always sound great together: Matthew Nardozzi and Emily Bordonaro. Matthew’s got Broadway and Hollywood credits, and has won the prestigious national “Young Artist Award.” Emily, a protégé of Betty Buckley (and winner of “The Betty Buckley Award”) is the best 18-year-old singing actress I know. They’ve both enlivened shows and cast albums of mine; and I hope we’ll continue to work together for many years to come. I love the rapport they have. They’re warm and natural, and charming. I’m delighted that they’re the very first singers we hear on this album. As George Burns used to tell me, “Every show needs a strong opening. That’s the first thing you need to think about....”

3. “I’M CRAZY FOR MY BABY IN A UNIFORM” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a song I wrote for my show “Mad About the Boy,” and audiences always seem to love it. This cheerfully exuberant number came to me in a rush–as so many of my songs have–when I was out at my favorite lake, way out in the country, in western New Jersey. Seth Sikes prepared the arrangement, with tap breaks. I’m lucky enough to have had several terrific singers record this number. Clark Kinkade made the first recording. Bailey Cummings has recorded it, too. When we did “Mad About the Boy” at the 13th Street Repertory Theater in New York City, Benjamin Grier was featured singing/dancing on this number (with backup singer-dancers), and Grier’s spirited rendition will be heard on the cast album, being released imminently. John Brady, another performer I really enjoy, is the fellow you’ll hear singing this song with great panache on this album. He’s also sung on my “Irving Berlin Revisited” CD, and will be heard on other CD’s in the Berlin series. He’s always fun–a born showman. (Incidentally, John was originally recommended to me by Seth Sikes, who sure knows talent–thank you, Seth--so we’ve come full circle.) Rayna Hirt, who choreographed “Mad About the Boy”–none better!--handles the tap-dancing on this recording.


4. “STRUTTIN’” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a joyful number I wrote for my musical comedy “The Seven Little Foys” (published by Leicester Bay Theatricals), to be sung and danced in that show by “Eddie Foy and the Seven Little Foys.” (And we’ll hear the original cast recording of the number later on in this album.) Beth Bartley, who co-starred in the show–I wrote the role of “Mrs. Foy” especially for her–really loved this song. But she never got to sing it in the show; her character died before the song was sung. Beth asked me if she could make a recording of “Struttin’” for a forthcoming album of her own. I said, “Yes, of course, Beth--but in the mean time, could you also make a recording for me, for this album?” Beth has been a huge favorite of mine since her student days at Juilliard. I love that rich voice–so much life in it! She’s worked on Broadway and Off-Broadway, and regionally. She’s sung on such albums of mine as “The Irving Berlin Songbook” and “Irving Berlin Revisited.” I’m working on another show for her. And oh yes--she sure knows how to strut!

5. “AN EDDIE FOY SOFT-SHOE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a song from my musical comedy “The Seven Little Foys.” This number was not part of my first draft of the show. But I invited a talented friend, Bobby Cronin–whom I respect as both a songwriter and a director–to sit in on an early reading of the script, and offer any input. He told me I needed another number for the character of “Eddie Foy,” and told me where to position it; and he was exactly right. (Master songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb–who gave us such shows as “Cabaret” and “Chicago”–told me you have to know who to listen to, and who not to listen to, because not everyone gives good advice; but Bobby Cronin has great instincts!)

I crafted this gentle, oldtime showbiz song especially for Michael Townsend Wright (for whom I’d written the role of “Eddie Foy”); it gave his character a bit more prominence in the show, and it helped ease us gracefully into the second act. (As I wrote this song, I had in mind some advice George Burns once gave me: “If you want to win over an audience, don’t push.”) I love Wright’s work. His credits include legitimate theater, film, television, and even burlesque. (He was Joey Faye’s last burlesque partner.) He was born too late for vaudeville, but would have fit right in. (He was a regular on television’s “The Uncle Floyd Show,” which often had a vaudeville feel.) He never performs a song exactly the same way twice. This rendition of “An Eddie Foy Soft Shoe” is notably different from the one you’ll hear him do on the original cast album of the show; but both are endearing in their own ways, and I’m glad to have this alternate performance by him. Others have performed this song–and will perform this song--but it was written for Wright, whom I‘ve known for 25 years, and he owns it.


6. “I WON’T BE AN ACTOR NO MORE” (lyrics by Chip Deffaa, title and music by George M. Cohan) is a reflective song I devised, based on a very early, jaunty, minstrel-type piece by Cohan. I slowed the original number down and set new lyrics, to craft something for the turning point in my show “George M. Cohan Tonight!” Up until that point in the show, everything had been going well for Cohan; now his run of good luck seemed to be coming to an end, and I wanted a song to express his mood. One afternoon during our run I brought Jon Peterson, the star of the show, the lyrics I’d just written on a sheet of notebook paper; I told him I’d have a proper musical arrangement for the number in about a week, and I hoped he could add the song to the show then. Jon read the lyrics I’d written, and said that if I could sing the song to him right then and there, he’d learn it on the spot and introduce the song, a capella, at the performance that very night. He did just that, and his a capella rendition of the song went over beautifully. I knew we were on to something when one old friend in the audience–a Broadway pro I’d admired since I was in college–asked me for a copy of the song, saying she wanted to add it to her act and eventually record it.

I’ve heard Jon Peterson sing this song countless times in the past decade, and he never fails to move me. He’s a great artist. I might add, I’m writing these notes backstage at the Seeya Theater in Seoul, Korea, where Peterson is performing my show in the summer of 2016. It’s still a thrill for me, hearing him sing and dance to this song. And I’m remembering, appreciatively, his offer to introduce the song a capella the same day that I wrote the lyrics; there aren’t many performers who could--or would--do that; and I’m still grateful.

7. “I’M IN LOVE WITH ONE OF THE STARS “ (words and music by George M. Cohan) /
“DID YOU EVER HAVE ONE OF THOSE DAYS?” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... Two of my favorite performers–Emily Bordonaro and Giuseppe Bausilio–sing this duet that I put together for my musical comedy “Yankee Doodle Dandy” (published by Leicester Bay Theatricals). I’ve worked with Emily–such a terrific singer--on assorted projects since she was 11. She’s been in such shows of mine as “The Seven Little Foys” and “The Irving Berlin Ragtime Revue,” and can be heard on the cast albums. And she was in the national tour of “Whistle Down the Wind.” Giuseppe, at 19, already has four Broadway shows to his credit (“Cats,” “Aladdin,” “Newsies,” “Billy Elliot”), and is a regular on television’s “The Next Step” (The Family Channel). He co-starred with Michael Townsend Wright in my musical play “Irving Berlin’s America,” and can be heard on the cast album. (He’s as talented as any actor his age; he has unlimited potentia;.) I always love hearing Emily and Giuseppe sing, separately or together. And they’re a joy to work with; I could not ask for better people to sing this duet. You can also hear them sing–separately and together--on such albums of mine as “The Irving Berlin Songbook” and “Irving Berlin Revisited.”

8. “A SONG FOR MOTHER.” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a number I wrote for my musical comedy “The George M. Cohan Revue” (published by Samuel French Inc.). In the show, at the turn of the 20th century, a young songwriter is demonstrating his latest ditty for a cynical New York song publisher, who’s declared that the American public will fall for any song about a mother. This song is my spoof of the sentimental salutes to mothers that Tin Pan Alley was churning out with such regularity in those days. That’s the great Seth Sikes (playing the songwriter) giving his all on this number. (He’s joined at the end by Michael Townsend Wright and Jon Peterson). For my money, Seth Sikes is the best younger male singer in cabaret today; I just love that voice, and that buoyant spirit of his. I was lucky enough to have Seth star in my show “Yankee Doodle Boy” (and the script, published by Drama Source, is dedicated to him). I’m doubly lucky–and very grateful–that he’s made some recordings for me over the years. He sings often at top nightspots, like Feinstein’s/54 Below. Go see him, if you can get a ticket!

9. “MY FATHER TOLD ME” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) is a song I wrote for my own father; my lyrics reflect the guidance my father so often gave me: “Follow your heart; do what you love; the money will find you.” I did not tell my father I was writing this song. My parents, my brother, and my sister and her kids all happened to be present the first time the song was ever sung in public, at the first performance of my show “The George M. Cohan Revue.” The song came as a total surprise to my father, who wept with joy as he heard Jon Peterson sing what my father immediately recognized were the words he’d so often spoken to me. That might have been the best present I ever gave my Dad. (And I was blessed with the world’s greatest parents.) I’ve heard Jon Peterson sing this song countless times in the years since that first performance; I always think of my father when Jon sings it.

10. “HORSE RACE” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) is a song from my musical comedy “The George M. Cohan Revue” (my lyrics, set to a sprightly Cohan instrumental), sung by the original cast. The scene: a show taking place within the show.... Listen to the song and you can visualize the scene.

11. “HATS OFF TO YOU” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) is another number from my biographical musical comedy “The George M. Cohan Revue” (published by Samuel French Inc.). Once again, I wrote lyrics for vintage Cohan instrumental music. The song is sung by Jon Peterson and Lynelle Johnson. The highly patriotic Cohan would have liked Lynelle Johnson, I think; besides being an excellent singing actress, she was “Miss USO” at the time we were doing this.

12. “AN ODE TO POPULARITY” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) is from my musical comedy “The Fanny Brice Story” (published by Leicester Bay Theatricals). And the singer putting over this number–with my lyrics, set to a Cohan instrumental–is another of my favorites, Bailey Cummings.

It always makes me happy to work on a project with Bailey. I like that fine, true singing voice. I like his spirit. He was a great help to me in the development of my musical “Irving Berlin’s America,” and did the first reading of that show. He may be heard on my “Seven Little Foys” cast album, and will be heard on forthcoming albums in my “Irving Berlin Songbook” series. This summer, as I write these notes, he’s doing musicals with the Ohio Light Opera; they’re lucky to have him!

Jonah Barricklo–who’s graced assorted projects of mine as a singer, actor, and dancer-- handles the tap-dancing.

13. “FAITH” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is the exuberant first-act closer for my musical comedy “The Family that Sings Together” (published by Drama Source). And I couldn’t ask for better performers for this song than Michael Townsend Wright, Emily Bordonaro, Ryan Muska, Jonah Barricklo, and Luca Yannuzzi. They get well into the playful spirit of this number. This song, incidentally, was originally commissioned by that gifted composer Michael V. Ficocelli, who asked me to create something for a concert he was putting together that would be featuring new songs of faith. Well.... this is the number that came to me after he made that request–a tongue-in-cheek song about faith that might not have been quite right for the serious, uplifting, spiritual concert that he was organizing, but sure fit the show I was writing at the time. (Thank you, Mike Ficocelli!)

14. “SOMEDAY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a song I wrote for my musical comedy “The Seven Little Foys” (published by Leicester Bay Theatricals); it’s practically the theme song of the show. The musical, inspired by the story of entertainer Eddie Foy and his family, mixed actual vaudeville-era numbers sung by the Foys with originals that I wrote for the show. I wrote the whole show very quickly. Well, I had to! The head of a regional theater liked so much one show of mine she’d presented, she announced that the theater would open its next season with the world premiere of a new show of mine. I hadn’t yet written a word of “the new show” I’d mentioned to her I was developing–just a few notes–but I do my best work under pressure, and delivered the whole show several months later so we could indeed open the new season with it. We ran six weeks there, and then took the show into the Fringe Festival in New York, the following season. Here’s the cast recording of “Someday,” with Michael Townsend Wright, Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Tyler DuBoys, Alex Craven, Max Beer, Zach Riopelle.

15. “PLEASE WAIT FOR ME, MISS LEACOCK” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a song I wrote for “The Seven Little Foys.” In the show, one of the Foy children, “Charlie,” who’s just 13, has a hopeless crush on the very-grown-up gal behind the counter at the local Sweet Shop in New Rochelle, “Miss Leacock.” And the beautiful Miss Leacock alas, will soon be getting married. Max Beer, who sings this song as well as anyone could sing it, is an unusually gifted young actor, who’s impressed me whether he’s appearing regional theaters in shows like “Brighton Beach Memoirs,” or starring on screen in the motion picture “Jeremy Fink and the Meaning of Life” (with a cast that included Mira Sorvino, Joe Pantoliano, and Marian Seldes).

This song grew out of my own boyhood memories of New Rochelle. And I named the character “Miss Leacock” in homage to a very special friend of mine, Victoria Leacock, who was indeed getting married when I was writing the song. I thought of the song as a kind of wedding present for her, and she got the first copy. (I wish there were space on this album to also include fine recordings of this song that have been made by Jack Saleeby and David Cronin, each of whom has found his own distinct, rewarding take on this ode to young love.)


16. “SOMETIMES I MISS NEW ROCHELLE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa)
is a song from my musical “The Seven Little Foys,” based on the real-life story of Eddie Foy (1856-1928) and his family. Foy took his seven children into vaudeville with him; they became the most popular family act of the era. The song “Sometimes I Miss New Rochelle” takes place in the show while the kids are out on the road, experiencing their first Christmas season without their mother, who’s recently died. They sing of missing the home they once had in New Rochelle--the family life with their mother. The lead singer–the first voice we hear–is Bailey Cummings. We hear, too, from Devon Eddy, Alex Craven, and the other “Foy children” in this recording from the cast album. Wonderful young singers. (Incidentally, I was born in New Rochelle; when I was a little boy, we lived near where the Foys had lived years before, and I heard stories about this famed family. I wanted to someday do a show about them, and the importance of family, for a long time.)

17. “ONE MORE CHRISTMAS – Finale Reprise” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a celebration of family, no less than of Christmas, carried off with open-hearted spirit by the whole cast of “The Seven Little Foys,” from our original cast album. (And boy! I loved writing that show. It gave me a chance to write a bit about my own family, as well as the Foys.)

18. “UNDER THE CHILLIWACK MOON” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a cheerfully crazy ode to a distant, much-loved hometown, sung by the lead character, “Kipp,” in my musical comedy Theater Boys. The song is sung here, with tremendous aplomb, by Seth Sikes, for whom I wrote it.

The town in the song, I might note, is called “Chilliwack” but it bears no resemblance to any actual place that might happen to bear that name. (I did have a friend who came from Chilliwack, British Columbia; but the Chilliwack in Theater Boys--this best-of-all-possible-hometowns--has a unique character all its own.) In the show, “Kipp” is apt to tell you about his hometown at any given moment. (The ever-inspiring Seth Sikes, who was a recent arrival to New York when I first met him, was apt to tell you, at any given moment, about life back in his hometown, Paris, Texas–“the second biggest ‘Paris’ in the world.” I loved hearing his comments about his old hometown; still do.) I liked giving the character of “Kipp” his vaudeville moments in “Theater Boys.” Seth Sikes did a wonderful job singing the “Chilliwack” songs.
(And you can hear another fine artist’s take on this song, on the “Theater Boys” cast album, where it is sung by David Cronin.) Seth, incidentally, as I write these notes, has been busy recording Irving Berlin songs for me, for future release; it’s always a joy to hear him sing. .

19. “LaVERGNE SEQUENCE”(words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a scene from my musical comedy “Song-and-Dance Kids” (published by Leicester Bay Theatricals), set in the town of LaVergne, Tennessee, early in the 20th century. Joining me in this sequence are Jonah Barricklo, Ryan Muska, and George Franklin as the boys, and Katherine Paulsen, Amanda Andrews, and Katie Buddenhagen as the good ladies of LaVergne. (All of those fine performers, I might note, have worked with me at one time or another on various projects; you can hear solo recordings by them on albums in my “Irving Berlin Songbook” series.)

20. “CHILIWACK REPRISE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa).... More vaudeville-type fun, as Seth Sikes–in this number from my musical comedy “Theater Boys”--returns to sing again about the hometown he left and loves. I had great fun writing this song. I wrote it with Seth Sikes in mind, and he sings with joy. Over the years I’ve had the pleasure of hearing a number of fin performers bring this song to life, and I’m grateful to all of them. (You can hear David Cronin’s version on the “Theater Boys” cast album. I wish there were also a recording of this song by Michael Czyz, who sang this song so wonderfully in the most recent New York production of “Theater Boys,” but both he and his understudy had to go back to their hometown in Canada when their visas ran out.)

21. “MAGNETIC WATERBURY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) sung by Bailey Cummings and Company.... I’m not claiming that this is the only musical-theater salute to Waterbury, Connecticut ever written–I haven’t heard every musical-theater song ever written. But this song (from my musical comedy “Song-and-Dance Kids,” published by Leicester Bay Theatricals) is certainly the only salute to Waterbury I’m aware of. I wrote this number while I was living in Waterbury, in rather bleak artists’ housing provided by Seven Angels Theater, while one of my shows was in rehearsal there. During a break in rehearsals, some adults in our company, who were from New York, were running down Waterbury--complaining that it was a dead town, that there was nothing to do there, that they wished they were any place on Earth except Waterbury, Connecticut. And several of the wonderfully upbeat younger members of our company, who were from the area--like Jack Saleeby, Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy--were casually countering that Waterbury wasn’t so bad, that we should see the great shows put on at their high school, Waterbury Arts Magnetic School; that Waterbury boasted the best voice teacher anyone could ever hope to work with, Miss Vagnini, and so on. And as adults upped their complaints about how dreary Waterbury was, the teens buoyantly came up with more and more of its good points, informing us that “It’s not so far from one of the world’s greatest amusement parks–Lake Compounce.” And no matter what complaints the adults voiced, there was no topping the arguments on behalf of Waterbury that were provided by young Jack Saleeby–Waterbury, he insisted, really wasn’t all that far from a lot of good stuff, like the ocean and New York City. (I guess it’s all how you look at things.)

I went back to my room, inspired by the kids’ offhand banter, and wrote this song. I probably ought to cut the kids in on the royalties, since the key points came from them. (I tried in vain to fit “Lake Compounce” and “Miss Vagnini” into the song, but couldn’t come up with rhymes.) I certainly will give the Waterbury Arts Magnet School, where the kids were educated, perpetual rights to perform this theater song. Jack Saleeby unwittingly gave me the best lines of this song. (And that’s not the only time that’s happened.)

By the way, I did go to check out the shows at Waterbury Arts Magnet School, as the kids suggested, and they were right; the shows were terrific. And filled with talent. I first saw Bailey Cummings--who studies musical-theater at the University of Utah today and sings lead on this recording--in a great original show, “Theory of Relativity,” while he was a student at the Waterbury Arts Magnet School. And he’s grown up to become one of my favorite singing actors. And if the backup singers on this recording (Nina Paganucci, George Franklin, Katie Buddenhagen, Ryan Muska, and Jonah Barricklo, who also handled the tap-dancing) aren’t exactly from Waterbury, at least one of them–Nina Paganucci–has often worked there, at Seven Angels Theater. And so many of the fine singing actors I’ve worked with in New York City over the years did get early vocal training with Waterbury’s Miss Marianna Vagnini, I probably ought to cut her in on royalties, too.


22. “A HYMN TO CHILLIWACK” (words and music by Chip Deffaa).... This is another one of my personal favorites, out of all the songs I’ve written–an homage to an idealized home town. The performer here is the multi-talented David Colbert. He’s not only not only a successful singer/actor who’s starred in shows like “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” in assorted US cities, he’s also a produced Off-Broadway playwright (“Confessions of a Liar”). He’s recorded for my “Irving Berlin Project,” and aided greatly in the development of my show “Mad About the Boy,” doing both the first reading and first recordings. I’m always glad to have a chance to work with David. This song is from my musical comedy “Theater Boys.” (You can hear another artist’s interpretation of this song, if you wish, on the “Theater Boys” cast album, where it’s sung by David Cronin.)

23. “SIDEKICK “ (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a number I wrote for my show “Mad About the Boy.” In the show, one character notes that when he was growing up, he always had fantasies of being a superhero–and the other character responds that when he was growing up, he just wanted to be the loyal guy at the superhero’s side. Toby Medlyn, with an assist from Cody Jordan, sings here of his ardent yearnings to be a sidekick.


24. “YOU NEED TO BE LOVED TO BE HAPPY”(words and music by Chip Deffaa)–a number I wrote for my show “Mad About the Boy”--is performed here by John Brady, with assistance from Al Roths (as “the father”) and Katherine Paulsen (as “Miss Sally”). And I certainly believe that you do need to be loved to be happy.... When we presented “Mad About the Boy” at the 13th Street Theater in New York City, I double-cast key roles. At half the performances, John Brady played the starring role; at the other performances, Cody Jordan played that same role. Each was excellent in his own way. On this album, you’ll hear John Brady sing “You Need to be Loved to be Happy.” On the cast album, which will be released shortly, you’ll hear Cody Jordan sing this song. I’m happy we’re able to preserve both performances.


* * *

DISC TWO


1. “A STAGE-DOOR KIND OF LOVE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa).... I wanted the second disc of this two-disc set to open with something special. And boy, I love the way Alec Deland and Gabriella Green–two younger artists-to-watch–work together. Such a wonderful rapport! (You can also hear them singing together on my “Irving Berlin Revisted” CD. And I hope to include them in other albums in the Berlin series. They’re two of my favorites.) I wrote this 10-minute bit of special material–a one-act mini-musical--especially for them. And while anyone can, of course, license and perform this musical sketch, they have a special claim on it, since they themselves provided the original inspiration.

The idea for the sketch came to me when I saw the two co-starring–quite wonderfully--in the musical “Mack and Mabel” at Stagedoor Manor, up in the Catskills. Now, Stagedoor Manor is–along with French Woods–one of the two top performing-arts summer camps in the world. A very special place. I always love seeing the shows there–so many talented young performers. I’ve had lots of friends who’ve gone to those two great camps, and I’ve enjoyed cheering them on, as their guests. My niece went to Stagedoor Manor, upon my recommendation, and made some great friends. The theater boys and girls attending those camps, year after year, can form pretty tight bonds. Even if they only see each other in the summers, acting in plays together.

I watched Gabriella Green and Alec Deland light up the stage, playing the star-crossed lovers in “Mack and Mabel.” They were very convincing lovers. And yet, once their summer at camp came to an end, they knew they’d probably not see each other in the coming year. And that gave me an idea for a musical sketch... about a boy and gal who’d played lovers at summer camp, getting together, afterwards, in the real world.....

The sketch incorporates several songs of mine– “Spoonin’,” “Just You, Just Me,” and “You Have Captured My Heart”--along with excerpts of George M. Cohan’s “My Musical Comedy Maiden” and Irving Berlin’s “I’ve Gotta Have Some Lovin’ Now.” And I love the way Alec and Gabriella (with an assist from tap-dancer Jonah Barricklo) make the most of the material. (If actors at any other camps ever want to perform this sketch at their camps, they are perfectly welcome to substitute the names of their camps for that of Stagedoor Manor. But Stagedoor, and its stellar young actors, provided the original inspiration; and if any actors at Stagedoor ever want to perform this sketch, licensing fees will forever be waived.) As for Gabriella and Alec, I’m happy that they do see each other occasionally; and I’ll always be glad to work with them.

2. “MISS CHANNING REMINDS US” .... What a wondrous burst of sunshine Carol Channing is, and has always been. I’m so glad she’s been a part of my life....
Here she offers a few apt cautionary words as we go into the next set of songs on this album.....


3. “FOR THE THEATER” (words and music by Chip Deffaa).... Many of us may wish for fame and fortune, or to become stars. But be careful what you wish for! You never know the challenges you’ll face along the way.... “For the Theater” is the opening number from my musical comedy “Theater Boys,” in which a director in New York City has invited a naive aspiring actor, fresh off the bus from his remote hometown, to his apartment for an audition. And while the director strives mightily to seduce his good-looking guest, he assures him nobly that everything he’s doing is simply... “for the theater.” Singing this song are the two performers I had in mind when I conceived “Theater Boys”–Seth Sikes as the naive young actor, new to the big city, “Kipp”; and Keith Anderson as the ardent director, wooing and pursuing “Kipp.”

Keith Anderson, who has one of the finest tenor voices in town, has done a bit of everything in his career, from plays, to musicals, to the Kennedy Center. He’s sung “The Star Spangled Banner” for the Cubs, toured with Perry Como, narrated the life of Billy Idol for television’s The Biography Channel. He was a star of my “Irving Berlin Ragtime Revue” and may be heard on the original cast album, as well as on other albums I’ve done celebrating Irving Berlin.

And man, I’ve always loved Seth Sikes’s work. He was recommended by Ryan Davis for a show of mine, “Yankee Doodle Boy,” and he did a terrific job in that show. It was obvious from the first day of rehearsal that he had star quality. I wrote the role of “Kipp” in “Theater Boys” with Seth in mind. (In fact, in the first draft of the script, the character was simply named “Seth.”) Seth never did wind up appearing in “Theater Boys”–the timing just didn’t work out; and for a while he got more interested in directing than in performing. But he recorded key songs from the show, which I’d written with him in mind; and I’m grateful. I love that radiant voice of his.

(Incidentally, you can hear a different recording of “For the Theater”–including some different lyrics–on the “Theater Boys” album, where it is sung by Keith Anderson and David Cronin.)


4. “OPENING-NIGHT PARTY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa), from my musical comedy “Theater Boys,” is performed here by Philip Louis Calabro, one of the engaging actors who played the role of actor/cater-waiter “Rocky Kreeger” in our 13th Street Theater production.
Philip, incidentally, is the only performer I know who has an equally talented twin sister– Ann Marie Calabro, who was in my show “The Irving Berlin Ragtime Revue.”

You can hear a variant recording of “Opening-Night Party,” if you wish, on the “Theater Boys” cast album, performed by Ricky Schroeder.

5. “LIZ SMITH” (words and music by Chip Deffaa), from my musical comedy “Theater Boys,” tells the story of how aspiring actor Rocky Kreeger found fame and fortune in New York City, thanks to the unexpected help of his favorite syndicated gossip columnist, the one-and-only Liz Smith. (This number, by the way, was inspired by real-life incidents in the life of actor friend Luis Villabon.) Ricky Schroeder–who’s been busy of late touring the country in the musical “Kinky Boots”--sings this story in song. And Liz Smith and Cindy Adams have long been my two favorite gossip columnists.

6. “SWEET TEA”/”SOMEBODY’S BABY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a “double” song–a counterpoint number–I wrote for my musical comedy “Theater Boys.” The performers on this recording are Jonah Mayor and David Cronin (with tap-dancing by Tyler DuBoys). I’ve always loved “double songs,” ever since hearing numbers like “Play a Simple Melody” and “You’re Just in Love” by the master of the idiom, Irving Berlin; they’re tricky to write, but audiences love them, too. And wonderful Jonah Mayor–who, as I write this, is seeing the world, entertaining on a cruise ship–and David Cronin--who won a “best in festival” award for his performance in the very first production of “Theater Boys” (at New York’s Fresh Fruit Festival) and can handle anything from musical-comedy to opera–carry this number off with verve.

7. “EX-GAY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a number from my show “Mad About the Boy.” On this album, the song is performed by Toby Medlyn and Cody Jordan. On the “Mad About the Boy” cast album, being released later this year, you’ll hear this number done by Toby Medlyn and John Brady (who alternated with Cody Jordan in the show).

8. “WHEN LOVE GROWS COLD” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) is a number from my musical comedy “Theater Boys”–performed here by my favorite Dutch entertainer, Joris de Graaf, in the bravura manner with which he put over this number throughout our run at the 13th Street Theater in New York City. I love de Graaf’s bold choices. I remember Emailing him in the Netherlands (where he grew up and started his career as a performer and playwright), asking him if he could do this run of “Theater Boys.” He’s a brilliant, remarkably uninhibited, and very spontaneous performer. I knew he’d add a wild, unpredictable touch to our production–and, boy, he sure did! Every night, he’d surprise me, as well as his castmates, with fresh touches. When he was performing this number, he owned the stage; and all eyes were on him.

He’s not the only performer to have done this show or this number, of course; but he sure put his own stamp upon it. (For another talented performer’s completely different take on the same material, check out Cody Derrick’s rendition of “When Love Grows Cold” on our “Theater Boys” cast album; I love the way each artist interprets–in his own, highly individual way--the material I gave them. That’s one of the joys of writing and directing shows–seeing what different actors may bring to the same material.) Joris de Graaf was also one of the stars of my musical “Mad About the Boy” in our recent 13th Street Theater production, and he will be heard on the cast album of that show, coming soon, as well as on albums in my Irving Berlin series. (Big thanks to valued friends Danny Everts Martinez, Chad Rankin, and Brady Chin for inspiration they helped provide for this number.)

9. “CRATER LAKE BLUES” (words and music by Chip Deffaa).... This was my own personal favorite moment from my musical “Theater Boys,” and a number of critics singled out this piece and “Tell Me Why”/”Back in Kokomo”–two flashback sequences in the Second Act–for extra praise. Rob Lester, writing in “Cabaret Scenes” magazine, was representative: “Act Two is a revelation: flashbacks show two main characters as teens coming to terms with being gay, each with a first love. Suddenly more serious and tender, there’s also warm coming-of-age humor. The acting here is thoughtful and moving.” I’m delighted that two of my favorite singing actors, Seth Sikes and Clark Kinkade, are on hand for this recording of “Crater Lake Blues.”

They’re youths, going for a swim in a lake in the middle of the night, gradually coming to understand their attraction for one another.... I wrote this piece out at my favorite lake, way out in the country. (It’s my favorite place in the whole world, and every time I go out there I come back with a new song, whether I want it not; I think that lake has magical properties.) And I couldn’t have asked for better singers to interpret this piece.

Clark Kinkade, incidentally, was not only in the cast of my first production of “The Seven Little Foys,” playing the oldest Foy boy, I wrote that part with him in mind, tailoring it to his strengths. He’s a member of the popular vocal group “RANGE a Cappella” today, and it makes me very happy when I see them singing on the Red Carpet at the Grammy’s, or doing a number at Radio City Music Hall. And Clark Kinkade and Seth Sikes really sound great together. Lately, Clark and Seth–who are both such wonderful singers--have been recording rare Irving Belin songs for me, for my “Irving Berlin” project.

(By the way, you can hear another performance of “Crater Lake Blues,” featuring Matthew Nardozzi and David Cronin–who are just as wonderful in their own way–on the “Theater Boys” cast album.)


10. “TELL ME WHY/BACK IN KOKOMO” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) – a flashback scene from my musical Theater Boys deals with two teenage guys who are falling for each other and trying to find a way forward – is performed here by two actors who are very special to me, Keith Anderson and Santino Fontana. And they sure sound great together. I’ve been a fan of Keith Anderson since I first saw him in the off-Broadway musical “Fairy Tales” (and bought the cast album just to hear his singing); he’s worked on many projects of mine. And it’s always a joy to hear that voice.

Santino Fontana–who has impressed me greatly since he was a teen–has achieved success on stage, screen and TV. He currently co-stars, alongside Rachel Bloom, on the popular TV series “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”; he provided the voice of “Prince Hans” for the mega-hit Disney animated motion picture “Frozen”; and he has starred or co-starred in numerous stage productions in New York, winning the Clarence Derwent Award for his work on Broadway in “The Importance of Being Earnest,” and the Drama Desk Award for his work on Broadway in “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” To me, he’s got the loveliest voice of any male actor in today’s Broadway community. I never miss his work. And whether he’s sung Sondheim (“Sunday in the Park with George”), Elton John (“Billy Elliott”), Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones (“The Fantasticks”), or Rodgers and Hammerstein (an absolutely perfect “Prince,” co-starring in “Cinderella”), his singing is pure, well-rounded, lyrical-- everything a composer could ask for.


I first met Santino Fontana, by chance, when he was just 17 or 18–a high-school student from Richland, Washington, attending the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in Moscow, Idaho. For 14 years I attended that festival–which attracted crowds of 20,000 annually--as a guest of Lionel Hampton, giving lectures on jazz. Of all the many young people I met at the festival over the years, Santino and Chase Baird (who’s made his mark since then as a jazz sax player) were the two standouts. Hampton used to say that if you had good ears and good eyes, you could spot exceptional talent virtually instantly–you could pick up all of the clues almost at once.
And when I met Santino Fontana, that was one of the few cases in my life where I sensed his potential instantly.

He had such an unusually attractive speaking voice–the timbre was lovely, and the voice itself seemed musical–you could sense what the singing voice would sound like even before hearing it. (And he won recognition as best vocalist, in a competition we had at the festival.) But more than that, the whole gently confident vibe he gave off was so “together”–it reminded me of how I felt when I first met Matthew Broderick–I just knew he could go places. He spoke with me of his admiration for Broadway songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb, and of his admiration for jazz singer/pianist Billy Stritch. I was amazed that some teen from a town I’d never heard of, from the distant state of Washington, would know all about about Kander and Ebb, and Billy Stritch. We agreed to stay in touch. As soon as I got back to New York, I told Billy Stritch about this impressive, talented teen I’d met. Billy and I took a picture together, which I mailed to Santino with the promise from Billy Stritch and myself that if he came to New York someday, we’d introduce him to Kander and Ebb. Six years would pass before Santino moved to New York–we stayed in touch in the interim–and I was delighted to see him co-starring in his first New York show, “The Fantasticks.” He’s never stopped working. And he’s terrific. It means the world to me that he’s represented on this album.

Incidentally, if you’d like to hear another, completely different recording of this number “Tell Me Why”/”Back in Kokomo,” on the “Theater Boys” cast album it is sung by Keith Anderson and Andrew Lanctot.


12. “DID YA EVER HAVE ONE OF THOSE DAYS?” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) is sung here by the great Jon Peterson. He’s sung this song many times, over the years, in both “The George M. Cohan Revue” and “George M. Cohan Tonight!” Jon loves this song, and I love the way he sings it. Besides the recording heard here, he’s also recorded this number for the original cast album of “George M. Cohan Tonight!” and will be recording it still again in a new arrangement, with guitar accompaniment, for his next solo album.

13. “I WON’T BE AN ACTOR NO MORE” (words by Chip Deffaa, title and music by George M. Cohan) is performed here by Beth Bartley. She’s a terrific artist–one of few performers who’s every bit as effective whether she’s doing straight dramas or musicals. And I know that if she chooses a song to sing–and she asked to record this song–she will approach it as an actor, getting inside of it the way she would get inside of a character in a drama. She’s great in musicals; and she’s equally great appearing in dramas by, say, Tennessee Williams (such as “Orpheus Descending,” which she’s done memorably both in New York and on the road). When she was a student at Juilliard, she used to earn extra money singing at a joint in the theater district. I went frequently to hear her sing, assuring her she had a bright future. The woman who ran the place told me not to compliment her, saying, “She’ll want more money, and she’ll believe she can make it in this business. Even I couldn’t make it in this business!” Not long after that, Beth got cast in “Fortune’s Fool” on Broadway; she’s been working ever since. And she sure understands this song.

14. “STRUTTIN’” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) .... Here’s an ebullient performance by Michael Townsend Wright and Company (portraying “Eddie Foy” and his children, who made up the top family act of their day), from the “Seven Little Foys” cast album. I wrote the role of “Eddie Foy” specifically for Wright, who’d long impressed me with his work on stage, screen, and television. And we were tremendously lucky with the personality-filled young actors we’ve had portraying the “Foy kids” in various productions. (This recording includes Devon Eddy, Jillian Wipfler, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Alex Craven, Tyler DuBoys, Casie Pepe-Winshell.) I love the spirit the whole group projects. And I very much believe in the sentiments of this song: “In life, you’ve got to know how to strut.”


15. “ALL-AMERICAN SWEETHEART” (words by Chip Defffa, music by George M. Cohan and Chip Deffaa).... Here’s a recording of this song by Jon Peterson, who’s performed it countless times in the past decade or so. (You can hear another recording of the song by him on the original cast album of “George M. Cohan Tonight!”) For my money, there’s no greater song-and-dance man working today than Jon Peterson, and he performs this number with great charm and understanding. It’s a high point of my show “George M. Cohan Tonight!’

Jon has starred in many musicals in his native England. He was brought over to the U.S. to star as “the Emcee” in the national tour of “Cabaret.” And he was covering the role on Broadway when he showed up one afternoon at an audition I was holding, for the role of “George M. Cohan” in a proposed show about him. He sang one song–an obscure Judy Garland song–and I told him he had the job. I called off the auditions, and sent everyone else home. (Other actors who were waiting to audition were quite angry, but I knew I’d found my Cohan. I knew immediately I was the presence of a major talent) Jon asked, “What do we do now?” This was a Friday afternoon. I told him, “You go home and rest. I’ve got to start writing a script. We start rehearsals on Monday, and we’ll open in three weeks.”

For his portrayal of Cohan for me, Jon has won many honors and accolades. He was nominated for a Drama Desk Award; he was honored by the Drama League; he won the Bistro Award, and the Connecticut Critics’ Circle Award.... and more. He’s still starring in “George M. Cohan Tonight!” I hope he’ll play it for many years to come, in city after city. (As I write these notes, he’s performing the show in Korea, and that’s where the photo of Jon Peterson was taken; and this poster is from our current Korean production.) And Jon Peterson is singing this song better than ever these days. I’ve put his performance of this number in the “next-to-closing” spot because George Burns used to tell me that was the most coveted spot in vaudeville: “That was a mark of honor, ya know--to be presented ‘next-to-closing.’”


16. “ SOMEDAY–Finale Reprise” (words and music by Chip Deffaa). And what better close for the album than the finale version of “Someday” from “The Seven Little Foys,” with Michael Townsend Wright and Company promising that we’ll all meet again.


One final note: This album is dedicated with appreciation and respect to the great Seth Sikes. No one could ask for a better singer to sing his songs....
— CHIP DEFFAA


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CHIP DEFFAA (writer/composer/arranger) is the author of 16 published plays and eight published books, and the producer of 16 albums. For 18 years he covered entertainment, including music and theater, for The New York Post. He is a graduate of Princeton University and a trustee of the Princeton "Tiger" magazine. He wrote and directed such Off-Broadway successes as "George M. Cohan Tonight!" and "One Night with Fanny Brice." His shows have been performed everywhere from London to Edinburgh, to Seoul. He is a member of the Dramatists Guild, the Stage Directors & Choreographers Society, and ASCAP. He’s won the ASCAP/Deems Taylor Award, the IRNE Award, and a New Jersey Press Association Award. Please visit: www.chipdeffaa.com.

RICHARD DANLEY (primary music director/pianist) is Chip Deffaa's first choice among music directors and has worked on many shows and/or albums of Deffaa's in the past decade, including "Irving Berlin's America," “The Irving Berlin Ragtime Revue,” "One Night with Fanny Brice," "The Seven Little Foys," "George M. Cohan Tonight!," “Mad About the Boy,” “Irving Berlin: In Person,” “The Irving Berlin Songbook,” “Irving Berlin Revisited,” and "Theater Boys." Danley has performed everywhere from daytime dramas on television, to cruise ships, to clubs, to Carnegie Hall. He is on the faculty of the American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA).


Note: Richard Danley was the musical director/pianist on most tracks on this album. Additional music direction/piano playing was provided by Michael Lavine, D. Jay Bradley, Sterling Price-McKinney. On select tracks, Vince Giordano may be heard on bass, Andy Stein on violin.

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Chip Deffaa’s shows and songs are all available for licensing. For more information on any of Chip Deffaa’s shows or songs, please feel free to contact Chip Deffaa Productions LLC, 50 Quartz Lane, Paterson, NJ 07501-3345, telephone: 973-684-3340; Email: Footloose518@aol.com; www.chipdeffaa.com.

Chip Deffaa is represented by The Fifi Oscard Agency (attention: Peter Sawyer, President), 1440 Broadway, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10018, Email: psawyer@fifioscard.com, tel. (212) 764-1100.

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Our thanks for the help provided, in various ways, by Carol Channing, Lee Roy Reams, Don Brown, Stephen Bogardus, Alex and Alec Deland, Matthew Broderick, Jed Peterson, Abraheem Abdelhaq, Yunis Alibrahimi, Adam Barki, Deborah Deffaa, Max Deffaa, Julia Deffaa, Louis Deffaa Sr., Josh Schaller, Ava Schaller, Lawson Saby, Logan Saby, Lucas Snyder, Donnie and Earl Snyder, Victor Calatayud, Adrian Carbajal, Brick Greenbean, the late John Wallowitch, the late Jack Gottlieb, and artist-to-watch Julius “Torreador” Taibor.

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“The Chip Deffaa Songbook” (p) and © 2016 by Chip Deffaa.



If you’ve enjoyed this album, you might also enjoy these 15 other Chip Deffaa albums (available from Amazon.com, CDBaby.com, iTunes, etc.): “Chip Deffaa’s Irving Berlin Revisited: Rare Songs of Love, Loss, and Revenge,” “Chip Deffaa’s Irving Berlin Songbook: Rare and Unrecorded Songs,” “The Irving Berlin Ragtime Revue,” “George M. Cohan Tonight!,” “Irving Berlin’s America,” “One Night with Fanny Brice,” “Irving Berlin: In Person,” “The Seven Little Foys” “Theater Boys,” “Presenting Fanny Brice,” “George M. Cohan: In his Own Words,” “Mad About the Boy,” “The George M. Cohan Revue,” “Irving Berlin & Co.,” “The Johnny Mercer Jamboree,” “George M. Cohan: Rare Original Recordings.”

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THE CHIP DEFFAA SONGBOOK

Musical direction by Richard Danley (and others)

Choreography and tap by Rayna Hirt, Tyler DuBoys, Jonah Barricklo


Musical numbers (all songs ASCAP)

DISC ONE:

1. “A FEW WORDS FROM MISS CHANNING” ... Miss Channing.

2. “ALL-AMERICAN SWEETHEART” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan and Chip Deffaa) .... Matthew Nardozzi and Emily Bordonaro

3. “I’M CRAZY FOR MY BABY IN A UNIFORM” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... John Brady (with tap-dancing by Rayna Hirt)

4. “STRUTTIN’” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Beth Bartley

5. “AN EDDIE FOY SOFT-SHOE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) .... Michael Townsend Wright

6.. “I WON’T BE AN ACTOR NO MORE” (words by Chip Deffaa, title and music by George M. Cohan) ... Jon Peterson

7. “I’M IN LOVE WITH ONE OF THE STARS” (words and music by George M. Cohan) / ”DID YA EVER HAVE ONE OF THOSE DAYS?”(words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... Emily Bordonaro and Giuseppe Bausilio

8. “A SONG FOR MOTHER” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) .. Seth Sikes (with an assist from Michael Townsend Wright and Jon Peterson)

9.. “MY FATHER TOLD ME” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... Jon Peterson

10. “HORSE RACE” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... “The George M. Cohan Revue” Ensemble (Jon Peterson, Dawne Swearingen, Michael Townsend Wright, Joan Jaffe, Hal Blankenship, Seth Sikes, David Warren, Lynelle Johnson, Cathy Remmert)

11. “HATS OFF TO YOU” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... Jon Peterson and Lynelle Johnson

12. “AN ODE TO POPULARITY” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) .... Bailey Cummings (with tap-dancing by Jonah Barricklo)

13. “FAITH” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Michael Townsend Wright and Company (Emily Bordonaro, Ryan Muska, Jonah Barricklo, Luca Yannuzzi)

14. “SOMEDAY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Michael Townsend Wright and Company (Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Alex Craven, Max Beer, Zach Riopelle, Tyler DuBoys, Emmaleigh Pepe-Winshell)

15. “PLEASE WAIT FOR ME, MS. LEACOCK” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Maxwell Beer

16. “SOMETIMES I MISS NEW ROCHELLE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Bailey Cummings and Company (Devon Eddy, Alex Craven, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Zach Riopelle, Tyler DuBoys, Jillian Wipfler)

17. “ONE MORE CHRISTMAS – Finale Reprise” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... “Seven Little Foys” Ensemble (Michael Townsend Wright, Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Alex Craven, Max Beer, Zach Riopelle, Tyler DuBoys, Bailey Cummings, Emmaleigh Pepe-Winshell)

18. “UNDER THE CHILLIWACK MOON” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Seth Sikes

19. “LaVERGNE SEQUENCE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Chip Deffaa and Co. (Jonah Barricklo, Ryan Muska, George Franklin, Katherine Paulsen, Amanda Andrews, Katie Buddenhagen)

20. “CHILIWACK REPRISE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Seth Sikes

21. “MAGNETIC WATERBURY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Bailey Cummings and Co. (Nina Paganucci, George Franklin, Katie Buddenhagen, Ryan Muska, and Jonah Barricklo, who also handled the tap-dancing)

22. “A HYMN TO CHILLIWACK” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... David Brian Colbert

23. “SIDEKICK” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Toby Medlyn and Cody Jordan

24. “YOU NEED TO BE LOVED TO BE HAPPY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... John Brady, Al Roths, and Katherine Paulsen


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DISC TWO:


1. “A STAGE-DOOR KIND OF LOVE” (words and music by Chip Deffaa, incorporating Deffaa’s songs “Spoonin’,” “Just You, Just Me,” and “You Have Captured My Heart,” plus George M. Cohan’s “My Musical-Comedy Maiden” and Irving Berlin’s “I’ve Gotta Have Some Lovin’ Now”) ... Alec Deland and Gabriella Green

2. “MISS CHANNING REMINDS US” ... Miss Channing

3. “FOR THE THEATER” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Keith Anderson and Seth Sikes.

4. “OPENING-NIGHT PARTY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Philip Louis Calabro
5. “LIZ SMITH” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Ricky Schroeder

6. “SWEET TEA”/”SOMEBODY’S BABY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Jonah Mayor and David Cronin (with tap-dancing by Tyler DuBoys)

7. “EX-GAY” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Toby Medlyn and Cody Jordan

8. “WHEN LOVE GROWS COLD” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Joris de Graaf

9. “CRATER LAKE BLUES” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Seth Sikes and Clark Kinkade

10. “TELL ME WHY”/”BACK IN KOKOMO” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... Keith Anderson and Santino Fontana

12. “DID YA EVER HAVE ONE OF THOSE DAYS?” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan) ... Jon Peterson

13. “I WON’T BE AN ACTOR NO MORE” (words by Chip Deffaa, title and music by George M. Cohan) ... Beth Bartley

14. “STRUTTIN’” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) .... Michael Townsend Wright and Co. (Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Alex Craven, Max Beer, Zach Riopelle, Tyler DuBoys, Bailey Cummings, Emmaleigh Pepe-Winshell)

15. “ALL-AMERICAN SWEETHEART” (words by Chip Deffaa, music by George M. Cohan and Chip Deffaa) ... Jon Peterson

16. “SOMEDAY–Finale Reprise” (words and music by Chip Deffaa) ... The “Seven Little Foys” Ensemble (Michael Townsend Wright, Jillian Wipfler, Devon Eddy, Peter Charney, Emily Bordonaro, Alex Craven, Max Beer, Zach Riopelle, Tyler DuBoys, Bailey Cummings, Emmaleigh Pepe-Winshell)


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THE CHIP DEFFAA SONGBOOK

featuring...

Giuseppe Bausilio, Emily Bordonaro, Matt Nardozzi, Seth Sikes, Santino Fontana, Jon Peterson, Michael Townsend Wright, Beth Bartley, Alec Deland, Clark Kinkade, Keith Anderson, Max Beer,
Bailey Cummings, Jonah Barricklo, Gabriella Green, Ryan Muska, David Brian Colbert,
Rayna Hirt, Jonah Mayor, David Cronin, John Brady, Katherine Paulsen, Joris de Graaf,
Cody Jordan, Toby Medlyn, Tyler DuBoys, Philip Louis Calabro, Ricky Schroder,
Jenn Spottz, Amanda Andrews, Al Roths, Katie Buddenhagen, George Franklin,
Jillian Wipfler. Nina Paganucci, Lynelle Johnson, Devon Eddy, Alex Craven
Peter Charney, Luca Yannuzzi, Zach Riopelle, Emmaleigh Pepe-Winshell

...with special thanks to MISS CAROL CHANNING....

Produced by Chip Deffaa; Musical Director: Richard Danley

Additional music direction/piano playing by Michael Lavine, D. Jay Bradley, Sterling Price-McKinney
Assistants to the Producer: SukHee Jun, Max Galassi, Nick Keeperman, Michael Kasper
Music preparation by Donald Brown and Richard Danley; Historical consultant: Jessee D. Riehl
Aides: Jeff Sewell, Kate Solomon-Tilly, Megan Ulan, Byeong hyo Son, Gabriel Beer, J. “Torreador” Taiber
Recording engineers: Slau Halatyn, Lance McVickar, Jason Steffan
Graphic Design: Frank Avellino; Interns: Max Beer; Michael Herwitz

Chip Deffaa Productions
Garret Mountain Records GMRD CDP 0530
“Chip Deffaa’s Irving Berlin Revisited...” (P) and © 2016 by Chip Deffaa [LOGO for Garret Mountain Record s] [BAR CODE]

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THE CHIP DEFFAA SONGBOOK CDP 0530

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