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The Country Club | An Idaho Dozen

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Country: Honky Tonk Country: Americana Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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An Idaho Dozen

by The Country Club

12 Westernized songs that twang and swing with both a classic country and a new-fangled honky tonk sound.
Genre: Country: Honky Tonk
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Little Satchel
4:46 $0.99
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2. I Tell You What
2:01 $0.99
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3. 5 Minutes
4:02 $0.99
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4. Stars in Your Eyes
3:45 $0.99
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5. High Fallutin' Newton
2:47 $0.99
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6. The Great Cornspiracy
3:14 $0.99
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7. Plastic Flowers
3:18 $0.99
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8. Hey, Little Girl
2:31 $0.99
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9. She Was Epic
3:25 $0.99
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10. I'm in Love (& I'm in Jail)
2:33 $0.99
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11. Walk Along John
2:41 $0.99
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12. Shine, Shave, Shower (It's Saturday)
2:51 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The Country Club is~
Jonah Shue- Vocals, Acoustic & Electric Guitar, Fiddle, Mandolin
Dave Manion- Electric Guitar, Baritone Guitar, Vocals
Ben Brault- Drums, Vocals
Bill Parsons- Upright Bass

An Idaho Dozen was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Steve Fulton and Pat Storey at Audiolab in Garden City, ID

ABOUT THE COUNTRY CLUB (THE SHORT OF IT)

The Country Club is a band of veteran Boise musicians playing original and traditional music “from the front lines of the nostalgia wars,” as they like to say. Equal parts honky-tonk, western swing, bluegrass and classic country, The Country Club’s debut album “An Idaho Dozen,” released in early 2014, pulls off the rare feat of lassoing disparate influences into a cohesive set of songs that struts, shuffles and snickers along the painted dirt highway.


ABOUT THE COUNTRY CLUB (MEDIUM WELL)

The Country Club is a band of veteran Boise musicians playing original and traditional music “from the front lines of the nostalgia wars,” as they like to say.

Jonah Shue (guitar, fiddle, vocals), Dave Manion (electric guitar, baritone guitar), Ben Brault (drums, vocals) and Bill Parsons (bass) were no strangers to the scene or one another when they came together in 2011, having shared handshakes, stages and studios for years.

“I guess it was a result of good inbreeding,” says Shue. “Small towns are like that. Eventually, it’s time to kiss a cousin.”

For Shue, whose other projects include the longstanding swing-jazz combo Frim Fram 4 and old-timey mountain music outfit Hokum Hi-Flyers, The Country Club is an outlet for his longtime love affair with honky-tonk, western swing and swaggering old-school country.

Hot pickin’ is a dominant characteristic of The Country Club sound — in fact, it’s damn near competitive sport, especially on stage once the boys have been properly oiled by the barkeep. When they’re playing fast and furious, it’s hard not to envision the scene in “Walk the Line” of the Sun Records stars roaring through the night on four wheels and marching powder.

“An Idaho Dozen,” The Country Club’s debut album, pulls off the rare feat of lassoing disparate influences into a cohesive set of songs. From rollicking rockabilly rave-ups to truck stop jukebox weepers to barn-burning bluegrass breakdowns, “An Idaho Dozen” finds the band swinging and strutting its stuff without forgetting to have fun and find room for a few laughs along the way (reference the darkly humorous “The Great Cornspiracy”).

“I wanted to take some fiddle tunes or old timey stuff and run it through the electric guitar machine,” Shue says. “There are so many great songs/styles/artists that are less than a degree away from each other that I can't really keep it separate. I was raised on recycled and repurposed music. It makes sense — to me.”


ABOUT THE COUNTRY CLUB (THE LONG OF IT)

In American culture, the country club symbolizes wealth, privilege, exclusivity — a playground for one percenters, to use the parlance of our times.

For The Country Club, a band of veteran Boise musicians playing original and traditional music “from the front lines of the nostalgia wars,” as they like to say, it’s an appropriately winking name to self-apply when you consider their tangled history and the public domain themes sprinkled throughout their songs.

Jonah Shue (guitar, fiddle, vocals), Dave Manion (electric guitar, baritone guitar), Ben Brault (drums, vocals) and Bill Parsons (bass) were no strangers to the scene or one another when they came together in 2011. For years, they had shared handshakes, stages and studios with the sort of mutual appreciation inherent to a tight-knit music community.

“Dave and I have taught music lessons next door to each other at Old Boise Guitar Co./Old Boise Music Studios for about 10 years,” Shue tells it. “We played together in Bill Coffey's band around the area. About five or six years ago, we played a few gigs as a duo and I thought it was a thing we should do more often. For whatever reason, we didn't really get it going again until my birthday party in 2011 at Pengilly's Saloon. From there, we played with a few different bass players as a trio until they moved on to other pastures and pursuits. We finally found a rhythm section that really clicked and ticked with Ben Brault [Reilly Coyote] and Bill Parsons [Reilly Coyote, Pinto Bennett]. Ben, Bill, and Dave had all played together in Jeremiah James' band. I guess it was a result of good inbreeding. Small towns are like that. Eventually, it’s time to kiss a cousin.”

For Shue, whose other projects include the longstanding swing-jazz combo Frim Fram 4 and old-timey mountain music outfit Hokum Hi-Flyers, The Country Club is an outlet for his longtime love affair with honky-tonk, western swing and swaggering old-school country.

“I like a lot of different music,” he says. “I wanted to have a band that could play my songs along with other classic country, western swing, bluegrass, whatever else. I grew up hearing that from my parents. It’s strange — there are all sorts of crazy sounds that compel me. I grew up playing fiddle/violin and heard a lot of old-time music from the beginning, but I first got the actual bug to pick listening to Mississippi John Hurt.”

Hot pickin’ is a dominant characteristic of The Country Club sound — in fact, it’s damn near competitive sport, especially on stage once the boys have been properly oiled by the barkeep. When they’re playing fast and furious, it’s hard not to envision the scene in “Walk the Line” of the Sun Records stars roaring through the night on four wheels and marching powder.

“We're freaky guitar geeks and we want to pick,” Shue continues. “We try to get a classic sound. I write a lot more toward, or in, that older style, but I don't think we are overly retro. I wanted to be able mix all those little subgenres of whatever songs we play on a regular night and have it sound like a band sounds, not four different kinds of bands.”

“An Idaho Dozen,” The Country Club’s debut album, pulls off the rare feat of lassoing disparate influences into a cohesive set of songs. From rollicking rockabilly rave-ups to truck stop jukebox weepers to barn-burning bluegrass breakdowns, “An Idaho Dozen” finds the band swinging and strutting its stuff without forgetting to have fun and find room for a few laughs along the way (reference the darkly humorous “The Great Cornspiracy”).

“I actually wrote a bunch of those songs a while back and am only now getting to release them in a band setting,” Shue says. “I wanted to take some fiddle tunes or old timey stuff and run it through the electric guitar machine. There are so many great songs/styles/artists that are less than a degree away from each other that I can't really keep it separate. I was raised on recycled and repurposed music. It makes sense — to me.”


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