The Gold Souls | Good to Feel

Go To Artist Page

More Artists From
United States - California

Other Genres You Will Love
Blues: Soul-Blues Urban/R&B: Funk Moods: Type: Lyrical
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Good to Feel

by The Gold Souls

A modern intersection of funk, soul, and blues featuring powerful female vocals and driving grooves.
Genre: Blues: Soul-Blues
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Silver Tongue
2:45 $0.99
clip
2. The Truth
5:27 $0.99
clip
3. Nobody
4:43 $0.99
clip
4. Take It Easy
5:43 $0.99
clip
5. Good to Feel
5:31 $0.99
clip
6. Sweet Release (feat. The Philharmonik)
4:15 $0.99
clip
7. Midnight Song
5:17 $0.99
clip
8. Bbg (Interlude)
2:15 $0.99
clip
9. Get on By
2:43 $0.99
clip
10. Park Boulevard
5:27 $0.99
clip
11. Hunger Is the Best Spice
3:40 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
BURNISHED BY FIRE • AHEAD OF FULL-LENGTH DEBUT, THE GOLD SOULS DROP THE LOWDOWN ON GROOVING THROUGH THE TRIBULATIONS OF MODERN LIFE

By Andrew Russel for Submerge Magazine

The raw, beating heart of funk, soul, jazz and hip-hop—all of which the furious Sacramento five-piece known as The Gold Souls have incorporated into their style—has always been the blues. Blues and its far-reaching tendrils have defined pop music in the last century, but it is not of pop. It can make you dance, it can speak to your inner being, it can heal, but it always deals with pain on some level, existential or otherwise. Through the wide branches of its influence, it continues to speak to the artist’s eternal conflict between escaping and confronting the abyss, and although the layers of time have polished it and its offshoots with a mellower, safer reputation, there is always the yearning, fearless voice within it that dances along the dire edge of life. That’s where The Gold Souls come in, crafting good-time music while never losing sight of its implications about life, the self and the soul.

Consisting of Juniper Waller (vocals), Matt Hevesh (guitar), Alex Severson (keys), Jace Dorn (bass) and Billy D. Thompson (drums), the band is not shy about laying the heart of their music bare thematically while still managing to make crowds dance.

“With funk, you get an immediate reaction,” says Severson. “It grooves and all that, it lets the lyrics sit. But also, I think it reflects how people go about their day greeting each other happily when they might really be dying inside. It’s all socially masked in not wanting to cause too much friction, and nobody wants to talk about how they really feel about things. With funk you can put it all under this fun, jovial layer.”

The new degree of honesty that characterizes so much of our discussion in the era of sharing is, with no exception, a central feature of The Gold Souls’ ethos. But you might not guess it while listening to sultry numbers like “Take it Easy,” a breezy neo-soul daydream reminiscent of Erykah Badu; or more uptempo jams like “Hunger,” a majorly danceable album-finisher that slyly deals with the difficulty of putting off romance in order to achieve the self-betterment needed to sustain it in the future. Both tracks are highlights of the band’s forthcoming debut, Good to Feel, a definitive introduction to The Gold Souls that covers the variety of their influences while also telling a loose story of loss in confidence and gain in character.

“That tune ‘Hunger’ is all about taking time to make sure you’re OK,” says Thompson. “The whole album is kind of a journey towards that. It starts with this confident, no-nonsense character who is self-assured and feels like they know what’s going on. And then, they start going through shit—life starts happening. The depth of the songs increase as it goes on. We noticed some common threads in the songs and tried to tailor the track order to tell a little bit of a story.”

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review