The Great Affairs | 4

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4

by The Great Affairs

Straight-up rock n' roll, with a pop heartbeat, inspired by the likes of Cheap Trick and Tom Petty, with nods to more contemporary artists like Butch Walker and The Gaslight Anthem.
Genre: Pop: Pop/Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. Rock N' Roll Heart
3:28 $0.99
2. Shame On You
4:03 $0.99
3. Sherrybaby
4:52 $0.99
4. The Ring
3:24 $0.99
5. Dyin' To
4:08 $0.99
6. Fists & Guitars
3:22 $0.99
7. Gone
3:14 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The Great Affairs

"Listening to these guys make music is a beautiful American experience." 
Ray Gianchetti, Kool Kat Musik

After 3 releases in as many years, 2009's "The Great Affairs", 2010's "Ricky took the wheels..", and 2011's "Happy Ender", The Great Affairs have recently completed work on the aptly-titled "4" EP, seven more tunes in the patented Tom Petty & Cheap Trick-inspired, rootsy pop-rock vein that has become their calling card.

In early 2012, having taken a brief hiatus in order to complete a long-gestating sophomore release, "The Kids Deserve Cable", from their power-pop side project fORMER, frontman Denny Smith, and lead guitarist Patrick Miller reconvened The Great Affairs, with a new rhythm section featuring Henry Go(Mink) on bass, and Kenny Wright(Bonepony) on drums and co-lead vocals.

With this shift in lineup, and fORMER now defunct, the decision was made to incorporate material from both bands into The Great Affairs' repertoire. In short order, the guitars got a little dirtier, the drums acquired some additional swing, and the band began to display a spring in its step that may not have been quite so evident in an earlier incarnation.

With "4", the band have set aside some of the acoustic-driven tendencies of their previous outings, relying instead on a slightly heavier guitar sound, with splashes of Hammond organ, piano, and percussion throughout to assist in the further realization this new sonic ambition. The introduction of Wright's bluesier vocal stylings on several tracks serves as a perfect counterpoint to Smith's breathier rasp, giving the band some new firepower in that department as well.
Hear for yourself…..

"4"……. January 15th, 2013.

Ladies and gentlemen, The Great Affairs.

"...playing loose and having a good, solid time making music from the gut and letting the sparks fly. That it comes off sounding so effortless is testimony to the talents of the participants." 
Bruce Bodeen, Not Lame

What others are saying:

The Murfreesboro Pulse
“Nashville based pop/rock band The Great Affairs’ latest album, Ricky took the wheels.., is a great affair indeed. This newly released collection of well-crafted songs picks up where their 2009 eponymous debut left off, yet raises the musical bar significantly. Lead vocalist Denny Smith penned all 12 tracks contained in this instantly likeable and highly memorable piece of musical ear candy. Ultimately, it’s the sum of all the parts that make this highly enjoyable album a success. From the inspired lyrics to the excellent guitar work, Ricky took the wheels.. is guaranteed to leave listeners satisfied and anticipating what’s to come from this highly promising band. This praiseworthy recording sounds like a major label deal should be waiting just around the corner. If this album isn’t perfect, then it’s damn close.”
Eric Allen, 2011

Classic Rock AOR Magazine
"Vocalist/guitarist Denny Smith delivers 10 songs, each one dripping with raspy vocals and tight power-pop arrangements. The Cheap Trick influence is audible on "Born A Ghost", while "Drown" has a Talking Heads vibe, but the songs don't come any stronger or punchier than opener "Head Light"....hooks aplenty."
Phil Ashcroft February 28, 2012

J.P.'s Music Blog
“The Great Affairs are back with their brand of good old-fashion Rock & Roll. This band does not need any gimmicks or to follow any styles to get noticed, their music says it all. The new album entitled "Ricky Took The Wheels" is available now on Faragon Records. The band comes right out of the gate with their straight-forward rock on "Feels Like Home" and "Inside Your Head." The ballads "My Apologies" and "You'll Never Know" carry an acoustic Wilco-type sound with some great lyrics that touch the heart. The band returns to their roots with the southern rocker "So Damn High" and "You're Not Funny." The Great Affairs have so many great songs on their new release that a major label needs to stand-up and take notice of this latest band to come from Nashville.”
Jim Pasinski, 2011

Powerplay Magazine
"Drawing musical sustenance and inspiration from the likes of Elvis Costello, The Cars, and Cheap Trick, the 80s will seep from your speakers within seconds of opening gambit "Head Light" bouncing in on its simple garage band-style riffage.

"Fix You" and "Lie To Me" display a certain harmonic knack as ooh-ahh backing vocals add a certain sweetness to offset a surprising but decidedly melancholy undercurrent. The melodies and harmonies are where it's at for these guys, with basic basic guitar lines offering the bare minimum of riffola. Still, it didn't do The fecking Beatles any harm..."
Harry Paterson February 22, 2012

Rock Society Magazine
"...chock full of driving, crunchy, uber-catchy Rock underpinned by some excellent three-part vocals and chunky guitar from a band who sound as if they're having the time of their lives. A great, fun-filled album."
SW February 22, 2012

Uber Rock UK
"....a cool find this early in 2012. A perfect blend of power pop, punk and rock for your money. The album is very well produced and the songs? There's not a bad one on the album. Had I heard this record last month I'm sure that it would be sitting comfortably in my top 20 albums of the year."
Russ P., January 25th, 2012

Absolute Powerpop
“The Great Affairs-Ricky Took the Wheels. The Great Affairs are led by Denny Smith, formerly of fORMER, whose "loud" power pop we reviewed here last year. Unlike fORMER, though, The Great Affairs have a more laid-back "Popicana" sound not unlike The Meadows, or the poppier side of Paul Westerberg. Ricky Took the Wheels is actually their second album, with their self-titled debut out late last year, and like the fine debut this has plenty to offer. "Feels Like Home" is as good as this style of pop gets, featuring jangly guitars and hooks and melodies galore, while "So Damn High" and "You're Not Funny" rock in the Tom Petty vein. Smith and crew know their way around a ballad, too, as "My Apologies" and "A Hundred Other Things" demonstrate clearly. And "Last Good Memory" closes the disc as it began, with an excellent roots rocker. ”
Steve, 2011

Bill's Music Forum
“Ricky Took The Wheels” picks up where the last record left off, with the Nashville band serving up more pop Americana. “Feels Like Home” is a terrific way to start things off…an upbeat number straight out of the Tom Petty songbook. Hearing The Great Affairs play this one feels like home, indeed, and this one is my favorite off the new album. “Inside Your Head” also has its charms, with a bit of Black Crowes injected into the punchy riffs. The verses shake you a bit, but it is the wonderful pre-chorus that gets you moving. “My Apologies” is a sparse and lovely fingerpicked tune, but then “You’re Not Funny” arrives - a bluesy road house track that gets your blood pumping once again. Similarly, “Bastard Son” is a driving pop rocker that proves these guys can be more accessible if they want to be. Finally, the record ends on a high note with the crazy good rocker called “Last Good Memory”.
Bill Sullivan, 2011






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