Various Artists | A Numerous and Brilliant Assembly

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A Numerous and Brilliant Assembly

by Various Artists

Colonial Williamsburg has produced a number of recordings that feature the authentic instruments and music of eighteenth-century Virginia. From classical to slave songs, this is a sampler of the music performed in the various music venues.
Genre: Classical: Baroque
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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Duke of Perth & Reel of Tollock Medley: Duke of Perth / Reel of Tollock / New Rigg'd Ship / Drum Intro, Bung Your Eye / Smith's Hornpipe
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
3:20 $0.99
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2. Over the Water to Charlie
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
2:45 $0.99
clip
3. Yankee Doodle
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
0:45 $0.99
clip
4. One Morning in May / The Rakes of Mallow
The Musical Performers of Colonial Williamsburg
4:44 $0.99
clip
5. Come Let Us Drink About
The Musical Performers of Colonial Williamsburg
2:07 $0.99
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6. Four Keyboard Pieces: Trumpet Tune / Air / A New Ground / Riggadoon
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
5:13 $0.99
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7. Sonata in D Minor, Op. 1 No. 4
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
6:57 $0.99
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8. O Dey Seo
The Musical Performers of Colonial Williamsburg
1:22 $0.99
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9. Obagway
The Musical Performers of Colonial Williamsburg
1:41 $0.99
clip
10. Diamond Joe
The Musical Performers of Colonial Williamsburg
2:37 $0.99
clip
11. Concerto in B-Flat Major, Op. IV No. 2, Allegro
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
2:23 $0.99
clip
12. Variations On "Fy Gar Rub Her O'er With a Straw"
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
1:43 $0.99
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13. A Song On Liberty to the Tune Of "The British Grenadiers"
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
1:56 $0.99
clip
14. An American Parody On "Rule Britannia"
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
2:33 $0.99
clip
15. An Ode to the Tune Of "God Save the King"
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
1:53 $0.99
clip
16. Liberty Song to the Tune Of "Heart of Oak"
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
3:34 $0.99
clip
17. Oh, Had I Jubal's Lyre
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
2:45 $0.99
clip
18. Cupid, God of Soft Persuasion
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
3:07 $0.99
clip
19. Concerto Xii, Opus 8, "Il Cimento Dell'armonia E Dell'inventione" (The Contest of Harmony and Invention)
The Colonial Williamsburg Governor's Musick
9:39 $0.99
clip
20. Beggar's Opera Medley: A Blind Lover / A Virgin of 15 Years / The Merry Meeting
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
3:02 $0.99
clip
21. The Dusty Miller / Miss Eleanor Kerr's Reel / Reprise, The Dusty Miller
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
2:12 $0.99
clip
22. Irish Walking Tunes: Paddy Wack / Irish Widow / The Sheep Shearers / William Glen / Sir Roger De Coverly / Andrew Cary / I'll Towzel Your Kurchey
The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums
3:37 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
A Colonial Williamsburg Musical Sampler

Music was a constant feature of Virginia life during the eighteenth century. Dance was an integral part of the social fabric of the times, and musical instruction was essential to a proper education. Traveling past plantation fields, one heard the work songs of enslaved African-Americans. Tradesmen sang while they worked. In homes and taverns, music was an enduring and favored entertainment, and when issues divided the colonies from the Mother Country, songs became a form of political protest.
Over the years, Colonial Williamsburg has produced a number of recordings that feature the authentic instruments and music of eighteenth-century Virginia. This program is a sampler of some of the best selections from those recordings.

Echoes of Revolution: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg
Fifers and drummers were an important part of the eighteenth-century military. As the signal instruments of the infantry, fifes and drums relayed the commander’s orders to the men in camp and on the battlefield. When the troops moved, the fifes and drums provided music for the march. Fifers and drummers had a world of music to draw from, and Echoes of Revolution: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg offers a selection of the marches, popular songs, dance music, and tunes from the musical theater of the times. Echoes of Revolution: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg was recorded outdoors to recreate the ambience experienced by visitors to Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area.

Performers: The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums Senior Corps, 1996, Tim Sutphin, Musical Director/Arranger, and Lance Pedigo, Assistant Musical Director/Arranger.

Nottingham Ale – Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg
Virginians in the eighteenth century drew on many sources for their musical entertainment, including published collections of songs and dance music and ballads, songs, and fiddle tunes passed from one performer to the next. These songs were often performed in taverns, where spirits, food, conversation, and music flowed freely. “One Morning in May” is a love song based on the popular 1750s tune titled “The Nightingale.” “The Rakes of Mallow” appears in a variety of musical collections beginning with Walsh’s Country Dances (1747). “Come Let Us Drink About” is a drinking song that first appeared as a half-sheet with music and was later published in The Vocal Miscellany (1734).
Nottingham Ale—Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg was recorded in front of a live audience in the Apollo Room of the Raleigh Tavern to re-create an environment similar to the one in which these songs were first played more than 200 years ago.

Performers: John Turner (fiddle, flutes, whistles, and vocals), Paul Vrooman (vocals), Cliff Williams (flutes and vocals), Jenny Edenborn (fiddle and vocals), Susan Faia (vocals), Barry Trott (flutes, whistles, and vocals), and Bill Weldon (vocals)

Instrumental Music from the Colonial Williamsburg Collection
This collection offers insights into the music of early America. The recording reflects a broad range of the kind of music that colonial Virginians enjoyed. These pieces are played on original eighteenth-century instruments preserved and displayed in the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum at Colonial Williamsburg by musician-historians using the playing styles and techniques of the times. The result is a musical experience that closely recreates the sound heard in eighteenth-century America. James Darling plays Henry Purcell’s Four Keyboard Pieces on a bentside Spinet inscribed “Stephen Keene, London 1700” and built by Edward Blunt in the last year of his apprenticeship. Wenceslaus Wodiczka’s Sonata in D Minor, Opus 1 No. 4 is performed by Thomas Marshall, keyboards, and Kevin Bushee playing an unaltered violin built in 1727 by Nathaniel Cross.

Music from Stories Under African Skies
This music is taken from Stories Under African Skies, a collection of African and African-American origin. In the original program, music was interspersed between the stories in keeping with the traditions and practices of African and African-American communities. In this recording, for the first time, we have included the complete versions of several songs, recorded as they might have been sung, at night, around a campfire, after the day’s work had been done.

Performers: Leonard Adams, Christy Coleman, Sandra Johnson, Bernetta Wake, Sylvia Lee, Felix Simmons, Marilyn Taylor, Lisa Reid, Robert M. Watson, Jr., and Dylan Pritchett.
A Gentlewoman’s Pursuit
The music of Ann Blaws Barraud, who came to Williamsburg as a bride in July 1783, included three bound volumes of printed music. Music was an essential part of any gentlewoman’s education, and the variety and complexity of the music in Ann’s collection suggests considerable technical ability.

Performers: James S. Darling (fortepiano and organ), Marion Wilson (soprano), Annie Loud (baroque violin), Jennifer Edenborn (baroque violin), Angela Ranzini (baroque violin), and John Barrows (viola de gamba)

A Concert of Eighteenth-Century Music Performed by James Darling
On the Wren Chapel Organ
The Wren Building at the College of William and Mary is the oldest surviving collegiate structure in America. In the summer of 1970, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation installed an English chamber organ built around 1760 in the west gallery. In the original recording, James S. Darling played a selection of popular eighteenth-century music on the Wren Chapel Organ. A Concert of Eighteenth-Century Music Performed by James Darling on the Wren Chapel Organ is not currently in release.
Performer: James S. Darling

In Freedom We’re Born: Songs from the American Revolution

These political songs chronicle the mood and events in America from 1768 to 1782. Many were simply topical lyrics published in the Virginia Gazette and set to a familiar English tune; others were parodies of popular songs of the time. Dr. Joseph Warren, one of the original Sons of Liberty, wrote “A Son on Liberty” as a response to the Boston Tea Party. The original verse for “An American Parody on Rule Britannia” was published in Philadelphia after the First Continental Congress had called for the nonimportation of British Goods after December 1, 1774. “An Ode to the Tune of God Save the King” is one of many lyrics set to this melody during and after the Revolutionary War.
In Freedom We’re Born: Songs from the American Revolution was recorded on location to recreate the ambience of a tavern or public meeting place where these songs might have been sung.

Performers: Jenny Edenborn (vocals, violin), David Gardner (vocals, violin), Jane Hanson (vocals), Thomas Marshall (keyboards, bodhram), Wayne Moss (viola da gamba), Barry Trott (vocals, mandolin), Paul Vrooman (vocals), Herbert Watson (vocals, German flute), John Watson (vocals), and Cliff Williams (vocals, baroque guitar)

A Delightful Recreation—The Music of Thomas Jefferson
Music was an important social and intellectual pursuit for Thomas Jefferson. As a young man he studied music and dancing, and by age 14 he was an able violinist. His musical ability gained Jefferson entrance into the society of Virginia’s most powerful men, but he also studied and enjoyed music for itself. His music library was extensive and well documented. The recording reflects some of Mr. Jefferson’s musical preferences.
A Delightful Recreation—The Music of Thomas Jefferson was recorded in the Governor’s Palace Ballroom where Mr. Jefferson performed with Governor Fauquier during his student days in Williamsburg.
Performers: Kevin Bushee (violin), Jane Hanson (soprano), Ulysses Kirksey (violoncello), Susannah Livingston (violin), Anne Loud (violin), Thomas Marshall (harpsichord, organ, pianoforte), Wayne Moss (viola da gamba, violone), Jeffery Swaluk (viola), and Herbert Watson (German flute)

Marching Out of Time: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg
In 1778, the General Assembly established the Virginia State Garrison Regiment to protect the capital of Williamsburg. An important part of that regiment was the Field Musick, the fifes and drums.
In 1958, Colonial Williamsburg raised a new corps of fifers and drummers to support the reenactment of military programs and for the enjoyment of the visitors to the Historic Area. The young members, drawn from a waiting list of applicants, usually spend nine years learning their art, and graduate from the senior corps when they graduate from high school.

Performers: The Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums Senior Corps, 1989, John C. Moon, Director/Arranger, Herbert E. Watson, Coordinator/Arranger, Stephen T. Johnson, Administrator/Arranger, John P. Shoosmith, Instructor/Arranger, Paul W. Vosteen, Instructor/Arranger

Playlist

Echoes of Revolution: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg

1. “Duke of Perth, Reel of Tollock Medley,” Duke of Perth, Reel of Tollock,
Drummond Castle MS, ca. 1743
“New Rigg’d Ship,” Neil Gow, A Second Collection of Strathsprey Reels, ca. 1804
“Drum Intro, Bung Your Eye,” Aird, A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and
Foreign Airs, I, ca. 1778
“Smith’s Hornpipe,” Ashworth, A New, Useful and Complete system of Drumbeating, ca. 1812
2. “Over the Water to Charlie,” Jonathan Fentum, The Compleat Tutor for the German Flute, ca. 1717
3. “Yankee Doodle,” Carr, Evening Amusement containing Fifty Air’s, Songs, Duett’s, Dances, Hornpipe’s, Reel’s, Marches, Minuett for 1 and 2 German Flutes or Violin, ca. 1796

Nottingham Ale—Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg

4. “One Morning in May” and “The Rakes of Mallow”
5. “Come Let Us Drink About”

Instrumental Music from the Colonial Williamsburg Collection

6. Four Keyboard Pieces, Henry Purcell (1659-1695)
“Trumpet Tune”
“Air”
“A New Ground”
“Riggadoon”
7. Sonata in D Minor, Opus 1 No. 4, Wenceslaus Wodiczka

Music from Stories Under African Skies

8. “O Dey Seo”
9. “Obagway”
10. “Diamond Joe”

A Gentlewoman’s Pursuit

11. Concerto in B flat major. Op. IV no. 2, Allegro, George Frideric Handel (1685- 1759)

A Concert of Eighteenth-Century Music—The Wren Chapel Organ

12. Variations on “Fy gar rub her o’er with a Straw,” a Scottish theme

In Freedom We’re Born: Songs from the American Revolution

13. A Song on Liberty to the tune of “The British Grenadiers”
14. An American parody on “Rule Britannia”
15. An Ode to the tune of “God Save the King”
16. Liberty Songs to the tune of “Heart of Oak”

A Delightful Recreation—The Music of Thomas Jefferson

17. “Oh, Had I Jubal’s Lyre,” George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
18. “Cupid, God of Soft Persuasion,” Felice de Giardini
19. Concerto XII, opus 8, “Il Cimento Dell’Armonia e Dell’Inventione” (The Contest of Harmony and Invention), Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

Marching Out of Time: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg

20. Beggar’s Opera Medley
“A Blind Lover,” Oswald, ca. 1756
“A Virgin of 15 Years,” John Gay, The beggar’s Opera
“The Merry Meeting,” Oswald, ca. 1756
21. “The Dusty Miller”
“The Dusty Miller,” Jenkins, ca. 1793
“Miss Eleanor Kerr’s Reel,” Copper, ca. 1790
Reprise, “The Dusty Miller”
22. Irish Walking Tunes
“Paddy Wack,” Skillern, ca. 1790
“Irish Widow,” Skillern, ca. 1790
“The Sheep Shearers,” Thompson, 1792
“William Glen,” New Coventry Dances, 1711
“Sir Roger De Coverly,” Aird, 1788
“Andrew Cary,” New Coventry Dances, 1711
“I’ll Towzel Your Kurchey,” Aird, 1788


Production Credits: Richard McCluney, Executive Producer, Chuck Smith, Audio Engineer, Michael J. Lombardi, Producer, Tom Green, Cover Photographer, Helen Mageras, Art Director

All income from the sale of this recording is used for the purposes of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, which operates the Historic Area of Williamsburg, and to carry forward its educational programs. Colonial Williamsburg also welcomes tax-deductible contributions. Friends interested in discussing gifts to the Foundation are asked to write the President, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Post Office Box 1776, Williamsburg, VA 23187-1776

©2000 The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation







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