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Timothy Cooper | Light on the Water

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Keith Jarrett Philip Aaberg William Ackerman

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"official website" "East Wind" Music Video "Light on the Water" Music Video

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New Age: Contemporary Instrumental New Age: Solo Instrumental Moods: Featuring Piano
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Light on the Water

by Timothy Cooper

Oceanic sound as in the music of dreams.
Genre: New Age: Contemporary Instrumental
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Worldscapes
4:23 $0.99
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2. Why
1:42 $0.99
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3. Rising
3:02 $0.99
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4. Solar Nights
2:39 $0.99
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5. Soundings
4:15 $0.99
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6. Curve of Madness
3:59 $0.99
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7. One Smile
2:19 $0.99
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8. Open Soul
4:14 $0.99
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9. A Quiet Urgency
2:43 $0.99
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10. Autumn Tears
1:27 $0.99
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11. Advancing Moors
3:29 $0.99
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12. Light on the Water
2:38 $0.99
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13. The Struggles
4:45 $0.99
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14. Glad Sorrows
4:06 $0.99
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15. Ribbons of Starlight
2:20 $0.99
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16. Solstice
1:34 $0.99
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17. Worldscapes (Reprise)
2:32 $0.99
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18. Advancing Moors (Reprise)
2:40 $0.99
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19. Advent
2:28 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
LIGHT ON THE WATER was No. 15 on the International New Age Reporter Charts in 2008!

Of his solo piano sounds, Timothy Cooper says: "I love the piano's ability to create oceanic sound—a great wash of sustained sound that can seem at once infinite and intimate, with no borders or boundaries--only the presence of being... Sometimes my music has no definable beginnings, no absolute endings: only waves upon waves of sound headed as if for all shores, as in the music of dreams.

Cooper, who lives in Washington, DC, creates thought-provoking art in several fields. In addition tobeing a pianist and composer, he is a novelist, photographer and film-maker. His first novel, World One, was about “nuclear war with a happy ending when the entire planet finally learns to live together in peace.” His second novel, 2020, deals with Jesus Christ returning to earth and running for President. “This time around instead of being a religious leader he becomes a politician. It’s a comedy.”

With his visual art, Cooper has created his Worldlights collection (www.world-lights.com), photographs taken all over the world showing the globalization of culture
and the exultation of commercialism. The photos are placed in large-format lightbox triptychs that emphasize light and shadow “to symbolize the dramatic tension between
consumerism and humanism, and the diminishing of individualism.” Cooper also has long been involved with film-making and his most recent projects are three
documentaries on human rights from his company Freedom’s Gate Films.

Beyond shining a spotlight on world problems through the use of art, Cooper also heads Worldrights(www.world-rights.org), whose mission is “to promote and protect human rights under principles of international law, recognizing that a violation of human rights anywhere is a violation of human rights everywhere.” The organization makes appearances on behalf of political and religious prisoners, disenfranchised populations and victims of racial discrimination. Worldrights utilizes diplomacy and legal petitions,lobbies governing bodies, and uses speeches, lectures and publicity to disseminate information and build awareness. Cooper has spoken before numerous international human rights organizations including various United Nations’ committees.

“I want to help our global society any way I can to make it more peaceful and harmonious,” explains Cooper, “and another way to do that is to release positive and peaceful music into the world.” The Light on the Water CD “represents two essential ingredients of life – light and water; and more philosophically it stands for my deep hope that out of the darkness can come light, out of tragedy can come renewal and rebirth. I began recording these pieces during the week following 9/11 when there was a lot of pain and tension in the air, and I could hear jet-fighter planes screaming over Washington, DC, even in the middle of the night. But after contemplating the depressing aspects of those terrorist acts, I also understood there was a positive side to the events as people bonded together with a sense of patriotism and brotherhood, spirituality increased, and society began rebuilding in many ways. I continued recording new music for the CD for several years.”

Light on the Water contains 19 instrumental tunes recorded as solo piano improvisational pieces without overdubs. “Some of the tracks begin with progressions or melodic motifs that I had played around with lightly on previous occasions, but had never fully explored. Other pieces were simply a sudden musical expression being entirely created at the very instant of recording it. But all of the material is improvisational from the standpoint that it was not worked out in advance or written down. I never knew where the music was going, but let it reflect the emotions I was feeling in that moment.”

The CD begins with “Worldscapes” which is “a hopeful clarion call for global unity.” “Why” asks “why the destruction, the catastrophic deaths, and the lack of resolution of the conflict that caused it?” “Rising” is “deeply optimistic that despite wars and attacks, we will overcome and make a better tomorrow.” The piece “Soundings” represents “sounding out how we are going to move forward as individuals and as a people to deal with tragedy.” “Curve of Madness” expresses “the sheer terror and confusion we felt about the events, but also the wonder at why some people on this planet would want to do what they did to others. But the next tune makes the statement that simple gestures of love, goodwill and kindness are needed, and maybe peace begins with ‘One Smile’.” The tune “Open Soul” characterizes “the need to listen to other people and to try to understand them.” “Autumn Tears” turns to “the on-going mourning and grieving” the terrorist acts brought. In the aftermath, everyone faced “The Struggles,” “how do we cope with this and what is my duty to my country and to the world?” “Glad Sorrows” sums up “the conflicting emotions we felt for the sacrifice and heroism of the firefighters and rescue workers as well as the citizens on the plane who fought back.” With “Ribbons of Starlight,” “I was thinking about the light shining on our planet from throughout the universe and that we must never forget that what we do here on Earth matters.” “Solstice” expresses “the need to get back on the trail of a united human destiny.” The recording ends with “Advent,” “a call for shaping a better future.”

Cooper began his musical career at age seven singing in the choir at the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul in Washington, DC. At the Washington National Cathedral, one of the largest sanctuaries in the country, he spent two years as a chorister in the junior choir and then moved up to the Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys while also attending and singing at the St. Albans School for Boys. “I received a very deep exposure to choral and sacred music, and I got to sing many of the best compositions by the top composers from the 16th Century through the modern era. It was very, very rigorous training because we rehearsed five days a week, sang programs four times during the week, and then performed at two services on Sunday. We also toured the United States and United Kingdom, and recorded several albums.”

When he was 17 and 18, Cooper traveled extensively and began taking photographs, primarily of people, in Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, England and Ireland. “I was beginning to understand humanity and the human condition. It gave me a sense of the global community.” During his high school years Timothy also learned to play guitar, but after hearing Ravi Shankar on sitar, Cooper began playing that instrument for several years. Cooper also had a passion for film-making. One of his short student films was about the Spanish Inquisition (“man’s inhumanity to man”), and it won numerous national and international film awards. This led to Timothy being the youngest student (at age 18) ever accepted at that time to the American Film Institute’s Center for Advanced Film Studies in Los Angeles, which primarily offered a two-year upper- graduate program. There Cooper studied classic films, wrote scripts and shot videos for critiquing, and attended lectures by Steven Spielberg, David Lean and Martin Scorsese. After leaving, Cooper produced a feature film, “The Big Deal,” about the end of the Sixties.

At age 19, while at the American Film Institute, Cooper began learning to play the piano, and from then on he has regularly practiced his improvisational creativity. “I love the piano’s ability to create oceanic sound, that floating feeling, countless waves tossed across endless seas.” Over the years Cooper has been inspired by acoustic-oriented
artists such as Keith Jarrett, Liz Story, Will Ackerman, Philip Aaberg and Suzanne Ciani.

“Even though the events of 9/11 are reflected in Light on the Water, the music is really my plea for peace and understanding in the world among all people.”

PUBLICITY: THE CREATIVE SERVICE COMPANY
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Reviews


to write a review

William and the RadioIndy.com Reviewer Team

Beautiful Solo Piano SC
"Light On The Water" by Timothy Cooper is a solo piano album with a peaceful state of mind. Mr. Cooper has a very long resume and certainly brings his best to this piece of work. The album's concept is for an oceanic feel, and the mission is accomplished. One can almost hear the sound of the ocean even though it's not there. The arrangements are very strong and the musicianship is superior. The sound quality is very clear. Highlights include "Rising," a very dramatic piece that still manages to adhere to the concept. The title track "Light on the Water" is uplifting and the twinkly arrangement will bring a smile to your face. "Solstice" has a bit of oddity in it and is very noble. If you enjoy beautiful meditative music and solo piano, you'll enjoy this one.
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RadioIndy.com

Congratulations on GrIndie Award
RadioIndy is proud to present Timothy Cooper a GrIndie Award for their CD "Light on the Water." A GrIndie Award is RadioIndy's stamp of approval that this CD is an excellent quality CD. Please join us in congratulating this artist on this accomplishment.
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Kathy Parsons

A Fresh New Voice!
“Light On the Water” is one of two solo piano CDs released simultaneously by Timothy Cooper (the other is “East Winds”). Dedicated to the victims of 9/11 and recorded on a concert grand piano, the nineteen pieces on this album are improvisational compositions that are introspective, a bit on the dark side, and very intimate. Where the pieces on “East Wind” were mostly very short, these are somewhat longer and more developed, with time to explore the various themes that involve nature and aspects of the human experience while reflecting on the events of that fateful day. Each of these freeform gems is unique yet becomes part of a beautiful whole, creating a mood that stays fairly consistent throughout the album. Most of the music is on the quiet side with no flash or harshness although some of the harmony is unusual in places. Several of these pieces have more energy than those on “East Wind,” but none of them is flamboyant. Somewhat edgy and deeply personal, Timothy Cooper brings a fresh new voice to the solo piano genre.

The CD opens with one of two versions of “Worldscapes,” a piece with a gently rocking rhythm on the left hand and a more improvised, freeform right hand. Both peaceful and questioning, it’s an auspicious beginning. “Solar Nights” is very atmospheric - mysterious with a feeling of vast open space. “Soundings” is one of my favorites, exploring a variety of musical moods that are mostly calming, but become stormy and dark in places. “Curve of Madness” is more turbulent and agitated, as its title implies, but is beautiful in its own way. “Open Soul” is one of the more melodic pieces, beginning with a whisper and building with the variations on the melody - richly compelling. “A Quiet Urgency” is more energetic, but doesn’t lose the peaceful mood of the album. The title track is another favorite with its grace and hypnotic flow. (There is a music video of this piece on Cooper’s website www.new-piano-age.com.) “Glad Sorrows” reflects the strange mix of emotions we all felt in the weeks following 9/11. I also really like “Ribbons of Starlight,” a gorgeous piece full of longing and hope. “Advent” is a lovely theme for that most-forgiving season of the year. Pensive and intimate, it brings the CD to a quiet close.

“Light On the Water” is excellent from start to finish. Edgy and experimental, this is music captured at the moment of its creation, inspired by events that changed all of our lives forever. Recommended!
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New Piano Age

LIGHT ON THE WATER
LIGHT ON THE WATER

Review from The Light connection
Light on the Water
Timothy Cooper; New Piano Age Music; 2008; $14.98;
www.new-piano-age.com

In the hands of a master musician, I find that the piano possesses an uncanny potential for communicating unbounded emotional depth and the vastness of eternity. Timothy Cooper is such a musician.

In Light on the Water, a collection of nineteen solo improvisational instrumental pieces inspired in part by the tragedy of 9/11 and recorded without overdubs, he exhibits a rare ability to explore the darkness of the soul without being swallowed up by it. The result is a magical blend of beautiful compositions played with wonderful sincerity and flawless expertise, the left hand rocking in a relatively regular rhythm while the right improvises to express not only the somber nature of the moment but the light beyond as well.

“I love the piano's ability to create oceanic sound—a great wash of sustained sound that can seem at once infinite and intimate, with no borders or boundaries,” he says. “Sometimes my music has no definable beginnings, no absolute endings: only waves upon waves of sound headed as if for all shores, as in the music of dreams. It is this sense of musical sustainability that I wish to explore, to create: Sound that rolls outto the edge of a horizon-less horizon and into a space too vast to fully comprehend, like countless waves tossed and lost across midnight seas.”

This is a magnificent album, the rare product of sensitive fingers and a heart laid open discovering each other on fine ivory. Some of the tracks are highly introspective (“Light on the Water,””“Autumn Tears” and”“Advancing Moon.” Others (“Rising,” for example) were improvised at the time of recording and as such come across as more whimsical, yet still in alignment with the overall peaceful, reflective tone of the album.

I recommend listening to” Light on the Water with headphones to experience first-hand the fullness of Cooper's soul that comes through in the music. Those who appreciate the finest in piano are sure to discover new treasures to with each listening.

Note: The impeccable quality of Cooper's music becomes even more stunning when you realize that composing and playing the piano are only two of the many ways in which Cooper finds artistic expression. A true'‘renaissance man' committed to exploring new vistas into thought-provoking subjects, he is also a novelist, photographer and filmmaker of some repute. His first novel, World One , presented a view on nuclear war that allowed “a happy ending when the entire planet finally learns to live together in peace”; his second, 2008 , is comedic in tone, showcasing Jesus coming back and running for President. His films include documentaries on human rights (a cause he champions as head of Washington D.C.'s Worldrights organization) and his photography is set up “to symbolize the dramatic tension between consumerism and humanism, and the diminishing of individualism.”

—Chiwah

Review from Improvjazznation
LIGHT ON THE WATER
August 2008

Timothy Cooper - LIGHT ON THE WATER: I have many friends who are keyboardists... I play the keyboards myself, albeit in a much different vein (some reviewers have called my works "odd-istry")... I can say, very honestly, that I've seldom heard solo piano with the ability to "touch" the listener as comes through in Timothy's compositions. The liner notes and the cut-sheet that accompanied the CD tells us that Cooper is an artist who strives "to bring enlightenment to the world"; if the listener takes the simple step of listening to this with headphones on, they will feel pieces of Timothy's soul - no doubt! That, in my many years of listening to and reviewing music, is what makes the difference... when an artist can communicate his inner feelings through the magical ivory keys with the clarity Timothy does, the listener will "grok" the artist's meaning without complicated analysis. That was particularly true for tracks like "Soundings", one of the longer tracks on the album (& my absolute favorite)... there is such body in his playing that it reminds me of my own personal tragedies and how the "sounding out" he speaks of can help us to pull ourselves back up by our bootstraps... many of the pieces here were realized after 9/11, which lends itself to such strong vision and interpretation. I'm highly impressed, and certainly hope we will hear more from Mr. Cooper... this gets our MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED rating; even if "new age piano" is less jazz than you normally listen to, you owe it to your own well-being to get this one. More information (& a short clip) is available at www.youtube.com/user/NewPianoAge.

Rotcod Zzaj

The Bookwatch
Midwest Book Review
The Library CD Music Shelf
Light on the Water, July 2008

Light on the Water is a CD of new age piano music written and performed by artist and human rights advocate Timothy Cooper. Though strongly influenced by and created in response to the September 11th attacks, Light on the Water is musical collection promoting peace, healing, and humanity above all. The flowing melodies and quiet beauty of the music respects the suffering of the dead and the survivors, even as it kindles hope for the future and shaping a better world. A heart-touching album, highly recommended.

Nexus Review:
July 2008

Light On The Water – Timothy Cooper
A talented young composer pours the soul of his experience of the world, including all his emotions about it, right into the keys in his debut CD of primarily piano music. Each piece flows out like a river to the ocean from his gifted hands. Refreshingly immediate, Timothy Cooper composed the music for Light On The Water in response to the currents of life in this very moment of time in which we find ourselves, not copied from some classical past.

From the pieces “Worldscapes,” to “Solar Nights,” to “Autumn Tears”, Timothy lends a fresh new voice, or should we say fresh new fingers, to the solo piano scene, with a style that has been called pensive, edgy and experimental. Says Timothy, “Even though the events of 9/11 are reflected in LIGHT ON THE WATER, the music is really my plea for peace and understanding in the world among all people.”

Instrumental PAVILION Review:

Catergory: Music
Genre: New Age
Artist: Timothy Cooper
July 2008

"Light on the Water" by Washington D.C. based Timothy Cooper, is a collection of nineteen instrumental tunes recorded as solo piano improvisational pieces without overdubs. The album was influenced by the tragic terrorist acts of 9/11 and the subsequent healing process that the American public went through. I must say that after the third listen I was moved and impressed by Cooper's playing and the sincerity of the compositions themselves.

The CD begins with "Worldscapes" which is "a hopeful clarion call for global unity" according to Cooper. The other pieces I have included in the amphitheater are "Autumn Tears", "Advancing Moors" and "Light On The Water" (for which there is a video on this site). The whole album is good, but these tracks exemplify an artist in reflection. They have an introspective ambient-like quality but the music never aimlessly drones. Some of the pieces on "Light On The Water" were simply a sudden musical expression being entirely created at the very instant of recording it. This method totally captures the emotions of the artist at the moment.

This is a fine album. Autumnal and somber in feel due to the nature of the incident this music surrounds so wonderfully, "Light On The Water" is a successful creation by an artist who has essentially laid bare his soul to the world.

You may purchase "Light On The Water" at Amazon or CD Baby.


Mainly Piano Reviews:
Light On the Water
Timothy Cooper
2008 / New-Piano-Age Music
57.2 minutes

"Light On the Water" is one of two solo piano CDs released simultaneously by Timothy Cooper (the other is "East Winds"). Dedicated to the victims of 9/11 and recorded on a concert grand piano, the nineteen pieces on this album are improvisational compositions that are introspective, a bit on the dark side, and very intimate. Where the pieces on "East Wind" were mostly very short, these are somewhat longer and more developed, with time to explore the various themes that involve nature and aspects of the human experience while reflecting on the events of that fateful day. Each of these freeform gems is unique yet becomes part of a beautiful whole, creating a mood that stays fairly consistent throughout the album. Most of the music is on the quiet side with no flash or harshness although some of the harmony is unusual in places. Several of these pieces have more energy than those on "East Wind," but none of them is flamboyant. Somewhat edgy and deeply personal, Timothy Cooper brings a fresh new voice to the solo piano genre.

The CD opens with one of two versions of "Worldscapes," a piece with a gently rocking rhythm on the left hand and a more improvised, freeform right hand. Both peaceful and questioning, it's an auspicious beginning. "Solar Nights" is very atmospheric - mysterious with a feeling of vast open space. "Soundings" is one of my favorites, exploring a variety of musical moods that are mostly calming, but become stormy and dark in places. "Curve of Madness" is more turbulent and agitated, as its title implies, but is beautiful in its own way. "Open Soul" is one of the more melodic pieces, beginning with a whisper and building with the variations on the melody - richly compelling. "A Quiet Urgency" is more energetic, but doesn't lose the peaceful mood of the album. The title track is another favorite with its grace and hypnotic flow. (There is a music video of this piece on Cooper's website www.new-piano-age.com.) "Glad Sorrows" reflects the strange mix of emotions we all felt in the weeks following 9/11. I also really like "Ribbons of Starlight," a gorgeous piece full of longing and hope. "Advent" is a lovely theme for that most-forgiving season of the year. Pensive and intimate, it brings the CD to a quiet close.

"Light On the Water" is excellent from start to finish. Edgy and experimental, this is music captured at the moment of its creation, inspired by events that changed all of our lives forever. It is available from www.new-piano-age.com, amazon.com, cdbaby.com, and iTunes. Recommended!

Kathy Parsons
MainlyPiano.com

New Age Reporter Review:

87 Microphones

I listened to Timothy Cooper's two albums, Light on the Water and East Wind fifteen times. That is a total of fifty-nine solo piano tracks times.. well, you do the math. It took a while to do it and I am the better for it. And I would not hesitate to do it again. I like Timothy's no nonsense improvisational style. His approach is clear and clean just like water, and just as life giving to the spirit. I got to wondering if he writes music that way I write reviews. The first impression is the impression that usually lasts. His track titles are plain and on point. He is a musical interpreter. His style suggests "This is what I saw and this is what I wrote." Now for some of those 59 tracks.

I realized that each of Timothy's tracks is like a short poem. They are definitely more than haiku and even more than quatrains, but with periods of activity and quiescence. If music can be complicated and simple at the same time, than this is it.

From the album of the same name, the track East Wind opens the recording with a slightly tempestuous score. It is not a violent storm, but a blustery omen. As the saying goes, "It is an ill wind that blows no one any good."

The tune Silent Stream by its very title is a bit ironic, but the sense is one of gentleness and peace. It is perhaps one of the best of the thirty tracks on the CD. The gentle flow winds down and around your mind, drawing you in for a cooling respite. The song segues nicely into Bird Flight. It is a small, brave bird that challenges the forces of nature in this warm, melodic poem. The reward is the ability to fly high above the earth and be master of all below if only for a short while.

I liked the title Holding Sway. Although the wording is antiquated, the sentiment is timely. You can be influenced by many things. Today it is mostly the media. Fortunately, in this case it is Timothy's music. We are invited to stop and smell the roses, carpe the diem, and live life to the fullest. Geologically, the extent of a human life on planet Earth is but a wink and a nod to a mountain.

Dawn of Time is the best of the best from the album. We hear no seismic upheaval, nor any volcanic explosions within, but merely a breath of life from Mother Earth. It is a song of awakening, of birth and of knowledge.

On the whole, I found Light on the Water to be a bit more somber than East Wind, but every artist has a serious period. Worldscapes is the first cut on the recording. It is a globetrotting journey that encompasses East and West in a contemporary style. There is a sense of water, of oceans to be crossed and mountains to be scaled and every corner to be explored. It is a good beginning.

The track called Rising piqued my interest. It is musically, a complex ordeal of strong piano and stronger melody. If you pardon the pun, it was too dark to represent the sun rising, but then I thought of a lonely soul rising from the darkness. That made more sense.

On the tune Curve of Madness I wondered on what stormy night Timothy gave life to the song. Some many times we come so close to the edge and never realize what will happen if we fall. This song is a man stepping off with one foot while the other remains on solid ground, but not for long. One of my favorites for its emotional potency.

87 microphones is the number it took to make the recordings, a quantity noteworthy in itself somewhat like the generous amount of tracks on the collections. Both albums, East Wind and Light on the Water offer a plethora of emotionally charged tunes that will suit any mood or perhaps stimulate the change of one. I liked both CDs and several times played one right after the other for a lengthy session with my inner self. I was rewarded every time.

Rating: Very Good

- reviewed by RJ Lannan on 5/23/2008


Title: Light On The Water by Timothy Cooper
Story Type: CD Review. July 2008
Deck: IF YOU LIKE SOLO ACOUSTIC GRAND PIANO, TRY TIMOTHY COOPER

TIMOTHY COOPER LIGHT ON THE WATER This is instrumental solo piano music so there is not too much to talk about musically. He uses his left hand primarily to play rhythm and his right hand to explore melodies improvisationally. It's pretty, inventive, fairly soft and perfect background for your next small gathering of friends. But it is far more interesting to talk about Timothy Cooper himself. He should have included some biographical material in the CD! Cooper creates thought-provoking art in several fields. In addition to being a pianist and composer, he is a novelist, photographer and film-maker. His first novel, World One, was about "nuclear war with a happy ending when the entire planet finally learns to live together in peace." His second novel, 2008, deals with Jesus Christ returning to earth and running for President. "This time around instead of being a religious leader he becomes a politician. It's a comedy." With his visual art, Cooper has created his Worldlights collection (www.world-lights.com), photographs taken all over the world showing the globalization of culture and the exultation of commercialism. The photos are placed in large-format lightbox triptychs that emphasize light and shadow "to symbolize the dramatic tension between consumerism and humanism, and the diminishing of individualism." Cooper also has long been involved with film-making and his most recent projects (from his company Freedom's Gate Films) are three documentaries on human rights (including "China Rising"). On top of all these artistic endeavors, Cooper also works as an advocate for world human rights by heading up the Worldrights organization in Washington, DC. (www.worldrights.org). This guy considers his music as just one more thing he can do to try to make the world a better place. Great concept! What will he think of next? A bridge of art from Alaska across the water to the Soviet Union? A choir made up of political prisoners around the world? A political novel teaching the old axioms that "power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely"? Whatever Timothy Cooper gets into, it appears it will probably be fascinating and will undoubtedly make us think. Light on the Water is available at www.new-piano-age.com, www.cdbaby.com, www.amazon.com, and www.iTunes.com.
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