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Timothy Crane | The Fall of a Sparrow

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David Lanz Yanni

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United States - Colorado

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New Age: Contemporary Instrumental Spiritual: Instrumental Gospel Moods: Featuring Piano
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The Fall of a Sparrow

by Timothy Crane

Innovative, beautiful, and moving instrumental pop featuring piano with orchestral arrangements.
Genre: New Age: Contemporary Instrumental
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Albion
1:32 $0.99
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2. Come Holy Spirit
4:21 $0.99
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3. The Sound of Snow
4:05 $0.99
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4. To Rise and Go
2:53 $0.99
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5. Father and Son
2:39 $0.99
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6. Alone
5:50 $0.99
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7. Star Cross Moon
3:28 $0.99
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8. The First Day
2:40 $0.99
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9. Festival De Musique
2:59 $0.99
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10. Slowly Awaken the Dawn
3:04 $0.99
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11. The Fall of a Sparrow
3:11 $0.99
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12. Promise
3:30 $0.99
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13. Daniel's Dream
4:36 $0.99
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14. Chansonnette
4:11 $0.99
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15. At Home in the Garden
4:24 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Timothy Crane's fourth album, The Fall of a Sparrow, is quintessential instrumental piano pop. A true mix of simple and complex, of soft and loud, of less and more, designed, as all music does, to trigger a variety of emotions. “If only one piece on the album touches a person’s spirit,” Tim says, “then it’s totally worth it to wrap that piece up with 14 others so that the person can have a meaningful emotional tie to the music.” The intricacy of the piano work is coupled with orchestral arrangements to make each piece stand on its own as a measure of art and human feeling. Each piece is unique, and each uniquely affecting.

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Reviews


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Candice Michelle

Review from Journeyscapes Radio
Timothy Crane is a Colorado-based pianist and composer who released his debut album, The Other Life I Dream, in 2004. Raised on a 1917 Knabe grand piano that he still performs on to this day, he began learning to play his cherished instrument before his feet could even reach the pedals. Comprised of fifteen compositions all written and arranged by Crane, his fourth album, titled The Fall of a Sparrow, includes new versions of three pieces that were previously released on each of his three prior albums. In what could be accurately described as a cross between neoclassical and contemporary instrumental music (with varying compositions naturally trending more towards one style verses the other), Crane crafts sweeping orchestral arrangements around his expressively melodic piano-centric compositions. Additionally, he is joined throughout by a handful of guest musicians, which includes Jason Rowsell on bass, Tom Melaragno on drums, Joe Fluken on acoustic guitar and Daniel Coffey on viola.

The opening piece, “Albion”, serves as a lively introduction clocking in at just over a minute and a half, as it moves along in a hurried manner with cheerful piano, classical strings and tinkling bells effectively signaling that it’s time to rise and shine. “Come Holy Spirit” ensues with an ascending melody comprised of piano and orchestration, as it bursts with a forte like sunlight parting through the clouds. Winter themed songs are often among my favorite on any given album and the next piece, “The Sound of Snow”, is certainly no exception. Guided by celestial strings and a meandering piano melody, this lovely composition effectively illustrates a snowy day amid the winter season with its seemingly magical laced nostalgia. “Star Cross Moon” is among the album’s gentler pieces, as well as another one of my favorites, noted by its exquisitely elegant viola performance that melds perfectly into its warmly rolling piano melody. Symphonic style drumming underscores a few of the album’s pieces, such as the exuberant “Festival De Musique”, which aptly conveys the notion of watching a grand stage performance. Wrapping up the album is “At Home in the Garden”, its title seemingly alluding to the protagonist fallen sparrow having been safely returned to its nest. A tenderly melodic piece with a definite ‘coming home’ vibe, it concludes with a deluxe ensemble of piano, orchestration and gentle percussion.

Jovial and heart-warming with a theme of encouragement and inspirational tone throughout, The Fall of a Sparrow feels particularly influenced by Yanni’s signature style and will likely appeal to a similar audience. An album not intended for mere passive listening due to the inherent grandiosity of the arrangements, Timothy Crane’s musical performances overall exude a dynamic radiance and on-the-go energy like that of beaming sunrays on a clear, crisp day!
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Candice Michelle

Review from Journeyscapes Radio
Timothy Crane is a Colorado-based pianist and composer who released his debut album, The Other Life I Dream, in 2004. Raised on a 1917 Knabe piano that he still performs on to this day, he began learning to play his cherished instrument before his feet could even reach the pedals. Comprised of twelve compositions all written and arranged by Crane, his fourth album, titled The Fall of a Sparrow, includes new versions of three pieces that were previously released on each of his three prior albums. In what could be accurately described as a cross between neoclassical and contemporary instrumental music (with varying compositions naturally trending more towards one style verses the other), Crane crafts sweeping orchestral arrangements around his expressively melodic piano-centric compositions. Additionally, he is joined throughout by a handful of guest musicians, which includes Jason Rowsell on bass, Tom Melaragno on drums, Joe Fluken on acoustic guitar and Daniel Coffey on viola.

The opening piece, “Albion”, serves as a lively introduction clocking in at just over a minute and a half, as it moves along in a hurried manner with cheerful piano, classical strings and tinkling bells effectively signaling that it’s time to rise and shine. “Come Holy Spirit” ensues with an ascending melody comprised of piano and orchestration, as it bursts with a forte like sunlight parting through the clouds. Winter themed songs are often among my favorite on any given album and the next piece, “The Sound of Snow”, is certainly no exception. Guided by celestial strings and a meandering piano melody, this lovely composition effectively illustrates a snowy day amid the winter season with its seemingly magical laced nostalgia. “Star Cross Moon” is among the album’s gentler pieces, as well as another one of my favorites, noted by its exquisitely elegant viola performance that melds perfectly into its warmly rolling piano melody. Symphonic style drumming underscores a few of the album’s pieces, such as the exuberant “Festival De Musique”, which aptly conveys the notion of watching a grand stage performance. Wrapping up the album is “At Home in the Garden”, its title seemingly alluding to the protagonist fallen sparrow having been safely returned to its nest. A tenderly melodic piece with a definite ‘coming home’ vibe, it concludes with a deluxe ensemble of piano, orchestration and gentle percussion.

Jovial and heart-warming with a theme of encouragement and inspirational tone throughout, The Fall of a Sparrow feels particularly influenced by Yanni’s signature style and will likely appeal to a similar audience. An album not intended for mere passive listening due to the inherent grandiosity of the arrangements, Timothy Crane’s musical performances overall exude a dynamic radiance and on-the-go energy like that of beaming sunrays on a clear, crisp day!
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Bill Binkelman

Review from Zone Music Reporter
On his latest album, pianist Timothy Crane has one speed (mostly) and that is full throttle. The Fall Of A Sparrow is not “ideal for late night relaxing,” in fact, quite the opposite. Hit the open road, maybe in a convertible, head for rolling hills and winding curves, insert CD, turn up the volume, and luxuriate in the drama, power, joyfulness, and orchestral oomph of this high energy, quite tuneful, and well-produced recording. The combination of an exhilarating drive will mesh with the equally exhilarating music and all you will have to worry about is your speedometer ending up well north of the posted limit. Yeah, this is one of those crank ‘er up and let ‘er fly albums. One that will make your heart race and a smile break out on your face. There are some quieter moments on the album, but never has the term “quieter” been meant more relatively.

Stylistically, I consider Crane to be similar to Yanni (not his earlier electronic period, but his mid and later period releases). It’s not just the orchestral nature of Crane’s music here, but the overall dramatic arc and the mixture of optimism and romance. One can also draw similarities to Wayne Grazt at his more exuberant, e.g. I am thinking of Gratz’s earlier releases such as Follow Me Home and Blue Ridge. Yet, Crane never comes across as imitative; this is his music and his alone. It’s possible that either of the two artists I just mentioned perhaps are influences to Crane’s composing and performing, which would his great taste in influences as far as I’m concerned! Besides Crane’s piano and his well-executed keyboard orchestral arrangements, there are several guest artists sprinkled among the fifteen tracks (see above). Of note, three of those fifteen tracks are reworked versions from earlier Crane albums (Dragonfly, Piaonforte, and The Other Life I Dream).

While a lot of the music on The Fall Of A Sparrow is uptempo and energetic, as mentioned earlier there are a few quieter passages or moments, such as the lovely yet sad “Star Cross Moon” (this track was also on Dragonfly), which is, more or less, a duet between Crane and violist Daniel Coffey. The mood is plaintive and evokes mournful remembrance at times, while also flowing with grace and beauty at others.

One of the elements that truly stand out on this album is how adept Crane is at composing catchy refrains for his songs and this is a quality he clearly shares with Gratz. The closing “At Home In The Garden” is a great example, as his piano runs are accompanied by subtle hand percussion and some delightful sparse orchestral additions. The opening track, “Albion,” is another winner as it comes bursting out of the gate with bravado and joy, with the orchestral strings being plucked and then short-bowed. That sets the listener up for the celebratory “Come Holy Spirit,” which follows next. The song’s first passage is a quiet and brief followed by a wonderful (and catchy) piano melody. The full orchestra folds into the piece shortly after its introduction. As I write this review and listen to this particular track, another artist comparison that comes to me is to an under-appreciated “one hit wonder” pianist from the late ‘90s, David Friedman and his album, Moonrise. Both Friedman and Crane really know how to not just integrate orchestral elements into rousing keyboards but they also have superb base sounds to work from as well. Crane really has homed in on perfection when it comes to applying not just the right amount of orchestration but the quality of same and which sections of the orchestra to call to action and also when. First rate stuff and not at all easy to pull off (trust me, many others don’t have anywhere near his talent at this).

The more I listened to The Fall Of A Sparrow, the more I (a) enjoyed it and (b) appreciated the attention to detail Crane and mastering engineer Steve Sundberg paid to the music and finally (c) the composing talent of this artist. If this album doesn’t break Timothy Crane to a much broader audience, I don’t know what else the poor guy has to do!
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Steve Sheppard

From One World Music Radio
It’s amazing to think just how time flies, I remember my first contact with Timothy Crane, all of four years ago with his album Piano Forte and here I am now walking through the realms of his latest offering, The Fall of a Sparrow.
We start with a brisk opener, called Albion, which is the oldest known name for the country of my birth, Britain. This lively short form gift for our musical journey moves us onwards and towards a piece called Come Holy Spirt, a reflective composition, that has a sense of its own energy about its construction. There is a beautiful fluency about Cranes performance and with the added instrumentation we are gifted a truly picturesque arrangement; there is a mood about this piece that is so enticing. The pause and change of tempo over the half way mark is clever and then the track seems to increase in intensity, this is certainly one to listen to a few times over.
The symphonic start at the beginning of The Sound of Snow was incredibly beautiful; one could imagine with ease this piece being part of a blockbuster seasonal movie. The piano then takes up the narrative and we are gifted a memorable and quite breath-taking composition of great quality and style.
To Rise and Go is up next, a flowing start on piano is only added to by a respectful layer of added instrumentation that creates for us a melodic piece, which perhaps seems to usher in a new path to be taken. There also seems to be an opportunity to move onward through this piece, which we must do now, as we move onto the next track.
That song is Father and Son. I was blessed to have had some amazing times with my father, those memories still linger as I get older, and here Crane has manifested an arrangement that is so thoughtful in its repose. One could imagine a father and son sharing some private moments that would never been forgotten through the energy of this piece.
I really enjoyed the change in tempo on the track Alone. A perfect careful beginning, drawing a narrative of aloneness is our start, and then Crane creates a narrative through his performance that is tinged with a sense of mournfulness, but always retaining a sense of hope within the construction of the composition.
Star Cross Moon is one of those tracks you wait for, almost know how it’s going to go, but still amazed at the depth of arrangement and compositional structure. Listen to the flow here, it’s truly moving, you could easily be standing outside listening to this in the early hours, watching the shooting stars fly across the face of the moon, the strings here are so carefully played, the orchestration is perfect for the theme and one of my favourite tracks of the release.
We now move into the second half of the album and come across a song called The First Day. The title poses many questions for each of us, but Cranes skill in multi-instrumentational performance is sublime. The piano dictates the narrative and the track just flows with an all empowering energy of a new beginning, a new day, the power within this piece just cannot be denied.
I love festivals and on Festival de Musique, we have a wonderful sense of excitement built into the arrangement of the piece. The percussion here is perfect for the tracks flowing narrative. Cranes empowering playing is energetic and exciting and filled with a musical colour that is alluring.
There have been a few albums and tracks that have landed on my desk about the dawn and first light; it is an inspiring time of the day and one that I love. Here the artist manifests a soft, but growing sense of anticipation on the composition called Slowly Awaken the Dawn. Through the tones of this beautiful piece one can almost watch musically the forest awaken, and a new day begin.
The title track is up next and I can see why our listeners are falling in love with it on the radio. This is another cinematic opportunity created by Crane, one that flows with a classical passion. The Fall of a Sparrow has everything, perfect pace, a superbly emotive melody and a formidable powerful symphonic sense of musical grandeur; this is a truly marvellous title track.
As we move deeper into the album we come across a piece called Promise, there is an undeniable sense of intensity here, the passion flows strong within this offering, we can feel through Cranes performance just how important this promise actually is. Listen also to the beautifully paced percussion and symphonic build and progression in this piece, it’s something to behold.
The night has fallen and it’s time to walk within the realm of visions, and here on Daniel’s Dream we have the perfect soundtrack for that moment in time. This is another favourite of mine. Crane plays this very carefully, but the anxious nature of this arrangement is quite addictive, the artist has perfectly manifested the theme music for these night time perambulations. Listen to the dark segment here on the lower notes; this is one of those pieces I could listen to many times over.
Our penultimate offering is called Chasonnette, which I believe may mean Little Song. Whatever the meaning this piece is far from tiny, Crane has a supreme ability to grow greatness even from the smallest composition. There is a real sense of fun and happiness here as well, that is so charming and inviting to listen to.
So we reach the end of our journey with Timothy Crane and his latest work The Fall of a Sparrow. But before we push open the last door and leave this musical dimension, the artist has one more gift for us to take along our way and called At Home in the Garden. It’s always good to leave your listener fulfilled and wanting more and on this track Crane does just that. It’s a sun kissed composition that builds slowly and creates a warm and lush back drop of sound, for us to leave this latest offering from the musician with a happy smile upon our faces.
The Fall of a Sparrow by Timothy Crane is an album that will not only pacify those whole love piano based arrangements, but also please those of us who love the added instrumentation that’s cleverly weaved into the mix. Timothy Crane’s expertise in composition and performance has brought to us, a truly splendid offering that will have us smiling all the way home, in an album that is packed with a melodic genius and will remain forever in the musical heart, an album bursting with a quality and style that should completely entrance the listener forever.
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Barb Robie

Wonderful music!
Wonderful music! I wish there were 10 stars!
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Helen

Best Album Yet
This artist is a gifted musician and The Fall of the Sparrow is his best work yet. If you liked previous albums you will love this latest album of Timothy Crane's. I highly recommend The Fall of the Sparrow.
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Denise

Best CD Yet!
I have all four of Tim''s CDs and they are all wonderful. This is my favorite of the bunch.
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Kathy Parsons

From MainlyPiano
"The Fall of a Sparrow" is the fourth album from Timothy Crane and my favorite of the four. Crane composed, arranged and orchestrated all of the music, produced and engineered the recording, and did most of the performing as well. Additional musicians are Jason Rowsell on bass, Tom Melaragno on drums, Joe Fluken on acoustic guitar, and Daniel Coffey on viola; Crane performs on a Kurzweil PC3x keyboard/synth. A variety of musical influences can be heard in the music from classical to pop to new age, and the overall feeling of the album is vibrant and very alive. Some of the pieces are more on the somber side, but there is a real vitality to all of the music. I have really enjoyed Crane’s previous albums, but there is something very special about this one. I even love the album cover artwork, which is very dramatic in its simplicity. The fifteen tracks on the album include twelve new compositions and “new and improved” arrangements of three pieces that were on previous albums. All of Timothy Crane’s albums have landed in the top 5 of the ZMR charts, but I fully expect "The Fall of a Sparrow" to go all the way to the top.

The album begins with “Albion,” a lively prelude with the piano dancing for joy and buoyant strings that make it soar. “Come Holy Spirit” is an exhilarating anthem for piano, strings, and wind instruments that lifts the spirit with gratitude and thanksgiving. As its title suggests, “The Sound of Snow” is quietly magical with a graceful, calming sparkle. “Alone” sounds like it could be a piece about isolation and loneliness, but this one is very peaceful. Performed on piano/keyboard with acoustic guitar and string washes, the piece gradually builds, adding more instruments and color as warmth flows from every note. “Star Cross Moon” first appeared on Crane’s 2010 release, "Dragonfly." I really liked the first version, but the interaction between piano and viola on this version is exceptional. “The First Day” is bold and dramatic with full orchestration along with the piano. I really like the rhythmic feel of this one! “Slowly Awaken the Dawn” is a new version of the piece from Crane’s 2012 "Pianoforte." The first version was fully orchestrated, and this one is a piano/keyboard solo. The title track is a gorgeous ballad that is both uplifting and poignant with a combination of electronic instruments and acoustic guitar. I love “Daniel’s Dream,” an expressive and powerful piano/keyboard solo (mostly - there is some light orchestration near the end) that was performed live (there is applause at the end - and very deservedly so!). “Chansonnette” was on Crane’s 2004 debut album, "The Other Life I Dream." Fully orchestrated and passionate, it’s another beauty! I can really relate to “At Home in the Garden,” one of my favorite places to be! Piano and strings create a peaceful atmosphere, and some of the other sounds are similar to listening to birds calling and insects buzzing, focusing on one sound at a time while enjoying the interplay. What a beautiful way to end this excellent album!

"The Fall of a Sparrow" is a likely candidate for one of my Favorites of the year. Very highly recommended!
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