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Tom, Brad & Alice | We'll Die in the Pig Pen Fighting

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Country: Old-Timey Folk: String Band Moods: Type: Acoustic
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We'll Die in the Pig Pen Fighting

by Tom, Brad & Alice

Tom Sauber, Brad Leftwich, and Alice Gerrard are a "'dream team' of old-time music. This is what traditional Southern mountain music is all about." (John Wolfe, CD Roundup)
Genre: Country: Old-Timey
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Five Miles from Town
3:06 $0.99
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2. We'll Die in the Pig Pen Fighting
3:23 $0.99
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3. Coal Creek March
2:14 $0.99
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4. Arnold Van Pelt's Tune
3:16 $0.99
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5. Betty Baker
2:09 $0.99
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6. Judge Parker
2:24 $0.99
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7. Possum Up a Gum Stump
2:53 $0.99
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8. Old Man Adams' Tune
2:10 $0.99
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9. Dora Dean
2:05 $0.99
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10. Rattler Treed a Possum
3:14 $0.99
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11. Rebel Raid
2:45 $0.99
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12. Greasy Coat
3:16 $0.99
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13. Ship in the Clouds
2:07 $0.99
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14. Devilish Mary
2:34 $0.99
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15. Charlie Barnett Lowe's Tune
2:39 $0.99
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16. Lost John
4:04 $0.99
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17. Boating Up Sandy
2:39 $0.99
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18. Ozark Waltz
2:14 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Tom Sauber, Brad Leftwich, and Alice Gerrard are all musicians' musicians, known and respected by their peers for their skill, taste, and lifelong devotion to the old-time and early bluegrass music they clearly love so well. In contrast to their other CDs, this third project focuses on tunes and instrumentals, with only an occasional vocal.

For more information, visit:
www.alicegerrard.com/tombradalice
www.alicegerrard.com
www.bradleftwich.net

Track notes
(Except as noted, Tom plays banjo, Brad fiddle, and Alice guitar)

1. Five Miles from Town
From Clyde Davenport of Monticello, Kentucky.

2. We'll Die in the Pig Pen Fighting (Brad: lead vocal)
From Thomas Talley's book, Negro Folk Rhymes, the lyrics are probably a veiled expression of resistance dating back to the days of slavery. Alice added the first verse, and we set the song to an unusual version of "Angeline the Baker" played by Norman Edmonds of HIllsville, Virginia.

3. Coal Creek March (Brad: banjo uke)
From Pete Steele, who was originally from eastern Kentucky but later moved to Ohio.

4. Arnold Van Pelt's Tune
Brad became friends with Arnold Van Pelt of Fayetteville, Pennsylvania, in 1986. Arnold was a musical companion of West Virginia fiddler Woody Simmons, and gave Brad a recording of the two of them playing this unnamed tune many years ago.

5. Betty Baker
From Melvin Wine of Copen, West Virginia. Melvin sang just a few words: "Over the river to see Betty Baker / She fell asleep and the devil couldn't wake her." He said that he learned it mainly from his father, although a lot of fiddlers in his area played it.

6. Judge Parker
Brad met several fiddlers who played this tune, named after Isaac Parker, a real-life "hanging judge" of the old West. This particular version is from John Kennedy of Pawnee, Oklahoma, born in 1913.

7. Possum Up a Gum Stump (Brad: vocal; Alice: beating straws)
Fiddler Hiter Colvin of Strong, Arkansas, recorded this tune in 1929 as "Rabbit up a Gum Stump." Brad inadvertently changed the name sometime during the 30 years since he learned it.

8. Old Man Adams' Tune
This is another of Oklahoma fiddler John Kennedy's tunes. John said he learned it as a boy from "old man" Tom Adams, a fiddler originally from Arkansas who had a big influence on John's fiddling. On his deathbed he made John promise never to forget this tune, and although John couldn't remember the name, he never forgot the tune.

9. Dora Dean (Tom: mandolin)
From the legendary West Virginia / Kentucky fiddler Ed Haley, "Dora Dean" was apparently a popular song of the time.

10. Rattler Treed A Possum
From a 78 rpm recording of Reaves' White County Ramblers, which was also reissued on County Records' Echoes of the Ozarks series.

11. Rebel Raid
Another wonderful tune from the incomparable Ed Haley.

12. Greasy Coat (Tom: guitar; Brad: fretless banjo)
The fertile imagination of Tom Sauber always takes tunes to unique places. This is his adaptation of West Virginia fiddler Burl Hammons' "Greasy Coat" to finger-style guitar.

13. Ship in the Clouds
Most people know this tune from the playing of Taylor Kimble; this ever-so-slightly different version comes from a recording of Norman Edmonds of Hillsville, Virginia.

14. Devilish Mary
This curious tune is one that Brad learned from Fate Morrison of Fox, Arkansas, on a visit in the early 1970s. It's apparently unrelated to the tune / song that usually goes by that name.

15. Charlie Barnett Lowe's Tune (Brad: banjo; Alice: fiddle)
Alice learned this tune from Roscoe Parish of Carroll County, Virginia. He said his dad learned it from Charlie Barnett Lowe, a noted banjo picker who lived nearby and who was Tommy Jarrell's father-in-law.

16. Lost John (Tom: fiddle; Brad: banjo, lead vocal; Bob Carlin, train whistle)
Bob Rogers, originally from Speedwell, Tennessee, is Tom's source for this tune. Bob moved to southern California after WWII and was still fiddling in the 1970s when Tom met him. Our words come mostly from the Delmore Brothers, with an assist from Jody Stecher.

17. Boating Up Sandy
Another tune from Melvin Wine. The only verse we've hear Melvin sing to it is: "I took old Sager on a hunt one night, just as blind as he could be / He treed eleven possums up a sour gum stump, I'll be dogged if old Sager can't see."

18. Ozark Waltz (Tom: harmony fiddle; Alice: autoharp)
The Morrison Brothers of Searcy County, Arkansas, recorded this in 1930. The twins played it in unison in the key of F; here we do it in G with harmony fiddle and autoharp in place of guitar.

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