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Roger Verdi & Martha Locker | Looking Ahead - Works for Trombone

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Looking Ahead - Works for Trombone

by Roger Verdi & Martha Locker

Classical music for trombone and piano. In the last twenty years, the trombone has come into its own as a solo instrument of great artistic power. Here are some favorites of the trombone repertoire as well as some hidden gems that are seldom heard.
Genre: Classical: Chamber Music
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Genzmer--Allegro
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:16 album only
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2. Genzmer--Adagio
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:47 album only
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3. Genzmer--Finale
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:32 album only
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4. Casterede--Allegro Vivo
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:17 album only
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5. Casterede--Andante Sostenuto
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:43 album only
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6. Casterede--Allegro
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
4:41 album only
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7. Handel--Grave
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:47 album only
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8. Handel--Allegro
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:10 album only
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9. Handel--Sarabande-Largo
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
1:04 album only
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10. Handel--Allegro
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:11 album only
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11. Bassett--Allegro Moderato
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:46 album only
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12. Bassett--Moderato Cantabile
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:23 album only
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13. Bassett--Allegro Marziale
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:05 album only
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14. Mahler--My Sweetheart's Wedding Day
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:16 album only
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15. Mahler--This Morning In The Fields
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
3:20 album only
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16. Mahler--I Have A Burning Knife
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
2:57 album only
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17. Mahler--My Sweetheart's Blue Eyes
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
4:57 album only
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18. Bozza--Ciaccona For Trombone And Piano
Roger Verdi, Martha Locker
6:04 album only

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Roger Verdi-Trombone

Roger Verdi holds a BA from Drew University and MMA from the Manhattan School of Music. His principal teachers included Edward Erwin, Hal Janks and Albert Lube. He is an active free-lance musician in the New York /New Jersey area. Ensembles he has performed with include: the New Philharmonic of New Jersey, the Riverside Symphony, the Hawthorne Symphony, the Bridgeport Symphony, the Princeton Symphony, the Princeton Pro Musica, the New Jersey Symphony, the New Jersey Pops, the Newark Cathedral Orchestra, the Delaware Symphony, the Garden State Band, and many others. In November of 2006, he performed Ferdinand David’s Concertino for Trombone and Orchestra with the New Sussex Symphony in Newton New Jersey. He is a founding member of the Modern Brass Quintet, and has performed with that ensemble at the 92nd Street Y, the Kosciuszko Foundation, the Storm King Arts Center, the Lincoln Center Library, as well as many other venues. He has recorded widely for the Newport Classics and Koch International labels. A veteran touring musician, he has traveled the United States many times performing opera and musical theater. His activities include many different styles of music; he has toured the world with the Glenn Miller Orchestra, and recorded CDs for the Chico Mendoza and David Cedeno Orchestras. Roger performs on a Selmer-Bach model 42B trombone, with a Dennis Wick model 5AL mouthpiece. He lives in Belleville New Jersey.


Martha Locker-Piano

Martha Locker leads a busy and diverse musical life, performing as a soloist and chamber musician in both the United States and abroad. As a soloist, Ms. Locker has performed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, the Westmoreland Symphony and the New York University Symphony Orchestra. She has performed in recital in the Helen Clay Frick Recital Series, the Steinway Society Recital Series and Bermuda’s St. John concerts. Her most recent engagements include performances at the National Gallery of Art and on Brooklyn’s Bargemusic series.

Ms. Locker holds Bachelor and Master’s degrees from the Julliard School, where she studied with Jerome Lowenthal, Jacob Lateiner and Peter Serkin, and is currently a candidate in the Ph.D. program at New York University, where she studies with Miyoko Lotto.

Harald Genzmer

Harald Genzmer was born in Blumenthal near Bremen in February 1909. In 1928 he began study at the Berlin Hochschule für Music with Paul Hindemith. After the Second World War, he was appointed professor of composition and assistant director at the new Musikhochschule of Freiburg, then, from 1957 to 1974, at the Munich Hochschule für Musik. In Munich Genzmer has led the department of music of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts for ten years. In recognition for his outstanding services as a composer and teacher, he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Bavarian Constitution (1998), the Arts Prize by the Bayerische Landesstiftung (1996) and the Maximilian Order, the most distinguished Bavarian Cultural Award, in 1991. His works include all genres, with exception of opera. Among his numerous orchestral, chamber music and choral works are also many educational compositions.

His Sonata for Trombone, 1974, is a highly rhythmic, accessible work. The two outer movements are propulsive and energetic, while the middle movement, marked Adagio, is a slow elegy. The C.F. Peters Corporation has granted the rights to this recording.

Jacques Casterede

Jacques Casterede was born in Paris on 10th of April, 1926. After studying at Lycée Buffon, he entered the Paris National Conservatory of Music in 1944. There he studied piano under Armand Ferté, composition under Tony Aubin, and analysis under Olivier Messiaen. He won five first prizes at the conservatory, in piano, chamber music, analysis, composition, and harmony. He also won the Prix De Rome in 1953 for his cantata La boite de Pandore. In 1960, he was appointed professor of Solfege at the Paris National Conservatory, then counseller of piano study in 1966, then analysis in 1971. In addition, he taught composition at Ecole Normale from 1983 to 1998. He has received numerous awards as a composer among them the Paris Civil Award in 1991, and the Charles Cros Award and Record Academy Award in 1995.

His Sonatine for Trombone and Piano, 1958, is a favorite of the trombonist’s repertoire. In three movements, it demonstrates the composer’s ability to weave elegant melodic statements through very complicated rhythmic structures. The last movement of his Sonatine is an especially rousing example of his style.

Georges Frideric Handel

Handel, 1685-1759, was a German born Baroque composer, who spent much of his career in England. He composed in most genres of his day, especially operas, oratorios and concerti grosso.
His Concerto for Oboe in g minor, here transcribed for Trombone and Piano by Ronald C. Dishinger, is an early work, and possibly spurious. The four movements, Grave, Allegro, Sarabande, Allegro, are alternately melodic and technical in the style of the early Baroque.

Leslie Bassett

Leslie Bassett was born in Hanford, CA, January 22, 1923, and grew up on ranches in the San Joaquin Valley. His early music training was on piano, trombone, cello and other instruments. He served during World War II in army bands as trombonist, arranger and composer. After the war, he enrolled at California State University, Fresno and was principal trombonist with the Fresno Symphony Orchestra. Graduate study at the University of Michigan under Ross Lee Finney was interrupted by a Fulbright Fellowship to Paris and work with Arthur Honegger and Nadia Boulanger.

He joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1952, then held the Prix de Rome at the American Academy in Rome from 1961 to 1963. He has also worked with the Spanish-British composer Roberto Gerhard and with Mario Davidovsky in electronic music. At Michigan he became chairman of composition, the Albert A. Stanley Distinguished University Professor of Music, and the 1984 Henry Russel Lecturer, the university's highest faculty honor.
He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Bassett's music has been widely performed by the nation's orchestras, bands, choirs, soloists and ensembles. He has composed electronic music and written for plays, film, and all performing ensembles with the exception of opera. He frequently serves as guest composer with performing ensembles and universities.

His Sonata for Trombone and Piano was composed in 1967 and dedicated to his wife Anita. The first movement is an austere dialogue between the trombone and piano, the second movement a haunting waltz, the third, Allegro Marziale, a stern march. An ethereal mood pervades the entire work.

Gustav Mahler

Gustav Mahler, 1860-1911, was an Austrian born composer and conductor. He was best known during his lifetime as an orchestral and operatic conductor. Mahler rose to prominence as musical director of the Vienna State Opera, leading the stagnant institution into a golden age. In his later career, he served with Toscanini as conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and as music director of the New York Philharmonic. Mahler completed nine symphonies and left two completed movements of a tenth. The only other genre he composed in was lieder, his three principle song cycles: Lieder eines fahrended Gesellen, Kindertotenlieder, and Das Lied Von der Erde.

His Lieder eines fahrended Gesellen, known in English as Songs of a Wayfarer, or Songs of a Traveling Journeyman, was published in 1897 after a long and difficult to trace compositional history. It was intended for low voice, but is often sung by a female singer. The texts, by Mahler, are believed to be inspired by the conclusion of an unhappy love affair.

This arrangement for Trombone and Piano is by Mr. C. Eric Carlson, Second Trombonist of the Philadelphia Orchestra. He is an arranger of many works for brass instruments, and his catalog and contact information can be found at http://www.cecmusic.com/. He graciously donated the recording rights for this CD.

Eugene Bozza

Eugène Bozza, 1905 – 1991 received his musical training at the Paris Conservatoire, winning First Prizes for the violin (1924), conducting (1930), composition (1934), as well as the Grand Prix de Rome. He conducted the orchestra of the Opera-Comique until 1948, then became Head of the Conservatoire in Valenciennes. He has a large catalog, including operas, ballets, and large scale symphonic and choral works. He is best known, however, for his chamber music emphasizing wind instruments.

His Ciaccona for Trombone and Piano borrows a popular form of the Baroque period where a series of variations is presented over a short harmonic progression. In Bozza’s work, the trombone states a noble melodic line, then follows with six variations of divergent style and technical difficulty.

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Reviews


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Candace Wilson


Mr. Verdi displays an elegant style on a frequently overlookd instrument. There is something for everyone here from classical to modern. I recommend it highly.
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John Thomas

Looking Ahead - Works for Trombone
Roger Verdi plays the trombone with a beautiful, clear and singing tone. His vocal treatment of the Mahler is beautiful, and his selection of repertoire is inspired. The interplay between Verdi and Locker is marvelous. Fantastic piano and trombone playing. Let's hope he records another CD, and soon.
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Ivy Martin

Looking Ahead - Works for Trombone
This is a beautifully played CD, especially the Mahler which I have never heard played better. Roger Verdi's playing has a beautiful lyrical quality - he literally makes the trombone sing. I wish him all the success in the world.
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