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Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony | Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments"

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Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments"

by Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony

The French have a wonderful expression: entre chien et loup – literally, between dog and wolf. It means something that is neither one thing nor another (neither fish nor fowl as English-speakers might say).
Genre: Classical: Symphony
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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments": I. The Hour of the Wolf
Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony
15:06 $3.99
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2. Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments": II. Duma, a Soliloquy
Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony
12:02 $3.99
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3. Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments": III. Agnus Dei
Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony
14:15 $3.99
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4. Symphony No. 1 "Sacred Monuments": IV. Postludium
Virko Baley & Cleveland Chamber Symphony
17:29 $3.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
VIRKO BALEY: Symphony No. 1, “Sacred Monuments” (1985, 1997-99) TNC 1505
"…sonic images memorable enough to take home.”
— Kyle Gann, The Village Voice, New York

The French have a wonderful expression: entre chien et loup – literally, between dog and wolf. It means something that is neither one thing nor another (neither fish nor fowl as English-speakers might say). Virko Baley’s Symphony #1: Sacred Monuments is entre chien et loup. Written for a chamber orchestra but with a huge arsenal of percussion and keyboards, it is neither a conventional large-scale symphony nor a more neo-Classical chamber symphony… The phrase also refers specifically to that time of evening when the daylight hasn’t completely gone and it’s not yet fully dark – when familiar objects take on an almost unreal cast. It’s a time when you can almost sense what the Australian aborigines call the Dreamtime, the ancient but ongoing process of creation, where the physical world is shadowed by a close metaphysical one. It is this netherworld that Virko Baley’s music inhabits…Baley’s Symphony #1, Sacred Monuments is clearly “about” something. Listen to its elusive, multi-layered rhythms, often just at the edge of audibility; the dramatic, at times almost cinematic sweep; the obvious references to Baroque or traditional Slavic music; the chorales for strings. They all suggest there is something more than just a grand spinning of notes at work here. This symphony does not just give its secrets away at first hearing…As noted earlier, a symphony’s grand scope demands ideas on a similar scale. Virko Baley’s Symphony #1 is a meditation on some of the largest ideas – displaying an almost Zen-like acceptance of the contradictions between our physical reality and the spiritual/psychic world that we often unwittingly travel in; between the linear world of the arrow of time and the cyclical nature of life and death. Understanding this bipolar view of the world is essential to understanding Baley’s music.
— John Schaefer, WNYC Radio

"Powerfully imagined, clearly articulated, and quite moving… It's a very serious ambitious statement by a gifted artist, and I wouldn't be a bit surprised if it turns out to have more staying power than many other contemporary works by today's trendier composers.”
— David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday

An evocative and emotionally satisfying take on Ukrainian music. Sacred Monuments has all the traditional elements that lure a listener in, with all the complexity that reveals new depth each time you return to it…The result is an emotionally satisfying experience whose power lies not only in form - the hauntingly Slavic scherzo of the 'Agnus Dei'; the conscious return to earlier ideas in the 'Postludium' - but in content. Baley gives us not so much a musical history of his native country as his own reflection of it from a distance, and the story is not nearly as important as its telling.
— Ken Smith, GRAMOPHONE December 2002

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