Voice in the Attic | Superheroes

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Superheroes

by Voice in the Attic

"A thought-provoking song. 'Superheroes' has a dusky, haunting, brooding, noir-ish melody that is pure goth-rock, and the song's hook is infectious." (Alex Henderson)
Genre: Rock: Modern Rock
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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Superheroes
3:15 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"The song shows my ambivalence toward the superhero genre that, other than in revisionist takes such as Alan Moore's Watchmen, mainly is (American) nationalistic propaganda. The chorus structure isn't exactly Q & A but something of the sort. It opens with layered backings that are all recognizably mine, so the voices could be emanating from somewhere in the singer's own mind. They are affirmative, stating that it's good to have those superhero characters as role models (actually, I always wanted to be the Hulk as a kid) before the main vocals set in again, doubting the validity of the concept and building a bridge to the verse. The 'mystical' verse contrasts with the 'poppier' chorus and is meant to convey the sinister atmosphere you find in vigilante movies such as Daredevil or Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy. The somewhat 'strained' vocals emphasize the emotional conflict underlying the theme." BC B.

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Alex Henderson

Thought-provoking and infectious
Horror films have influenced a wide variety of rock music, but different rockers have used the horror element in different ways. While the grindcore area of death metal has been influenced by the graphic, cartoonish, over-the-top violence of slasher films (including the Chuckie and Jason franchises), goth-rock and gothic metal can be darkly romantic in a way that has a lot more in common with old Dracula movies or the “Dark Shadows” television series of the 1960s and early 1970s. In other words, goth bands are often going for nuance and plot rather than gore for the sake of gore. And there is plenty of nuance and plot on Voice in the Attic’s moody goth-rock single, “Superheroes.” But lyrically, the thing that sets this thought-provoking song apart from a lot of goth-rock is the way it draws on the superhero genre and questions that genre in the process.

“Superheroes” has a dusky, haunting, brooding, noir-ish melody that is pure goth-rock, and the song’s hook is infectious. But in addition to being melodically appealing, the single has interesting lyrics and poses the question: who needs superheroes? In a press release, Voice in the Attic point out that superhero characters can serve as political propaganda tools and be used to promote “nationalistic propaganda.” Yet the song does not flat-out condemn superheroes any more than it endorses them. Voice in the Attic express mixed emotions about superheroes, and Voice appears to be enjoying them and expressing reservations about them at the same time.

Superhero characters, past and present, aren’t something one hears about a lot in goth-rock. Again, goth songs are more likely to be influenced by darkly romantic horror than superhero characters. Goths have been described as romantic people in an unromantic world, and that is a quality one has encountered in everyone from Bauhaus (a seminal goth-rock band) to Sisters of Mercy to Lacuna Coil to Black Tape for a Blue Girl. But with “Superheroes,” Voice in the Attic are not afraid to do something unconventional with the goth genre.

Both melodically and lyrically, “Superheroes” is a very memorable contribution to goth-rock.
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