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Zbigniew Seifert Variospheres | Live in Solothurn

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Live in Solothurn

by Zbigniew Seifert Variospheres

This album is a recording of the concert held on 18 January 1976 in Solothurn, Switzerland, during the 2nd International Swiss Jazz Days. After a number of years spent in Germany, Seifert was ready to set up a band he could present his own compositions.
Genre: Jazz: Mainstream Jazz
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Unidentified Piece (Live)
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2. Man of the Light (Live)
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3. Way to Oasis (Live)
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4. The Sound of Gold (Live)
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5. Turbulent Plover (Live)
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6. On the Farm (Live)
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Zbigniew Seifert – violin
Michel Herr – piano & Fender Rhodes electric piano
Hans Hartmann – bass
Janusz Stefański – drums

This album is a recording of the concert held on 18 January 1976 in Solothurn in Switzerland, during the 2nd International Swiss Jazz Days. After a number of years spent in Germany, Seifert was ready to set up a band he could present his own compositions with. Variospheres was an international band set up by Zbigniew Seifert that operated in two lineups: one
with the musicians recorded on this CD, and the other, in which the leader was accompanied by Adelhard Roidinger (bass) and Lala Kovacev (drums). The name Variospheres was invented by the musicians themselves; in an interview for Radio Kraków in 1978 Seifert explained that it meant “crazy spheres (...)”. Today, there is a problem with the spelling of the
band’s name as some materials read Variouspheres, while others feature Variospheres. Michel Herr believes that the latter version, Variospheres, is correct and follows the intention of the band’s leader.
We hope that this archive album, although distant from technical perfection, will provide a rare treat for the fans of Seifert’s music. We also hope that this CD will start the series of archival recordings of the extraordinary artist.

Michel Herr o Variospheres:
“It was a privilege to be a member of this magnificent band in which four strong individuals served with great spirit the beautiful music of Zbigniew Seifert. The name of the band referred to the multiple and contrasting atmospheres that we used to explore
(straight modal swing, free sections, folk influences...). This quartet was probably a unique opportunity for Zbigniew to present his own band and his own music extensively in Western Europe (I think we played in Germany, Switzerland and Luxemburg). Zbigniew
also invited us to bring in some compositions. Each of us had the sensation that something special was unfolding.
This tour leaves me with great memories of some intense playing and beautiful complicity between the four musicians. And for me, the conviction to have shared the stage with a true master.”

Hans Hartmann was highly moved to hear this music after so many years. His frail health, however, let him write only one word: “UNBOLIVIABLE”.

This is what a member of the band, Janusz Stefański, said of Variospheres: “Together with Michel Herr from Belgium and Hans Hartmann from Switzerland, we set up the band Variospheres. We mostly played Zbyszek’s compositions. He always wanted to have powerful, expressive drums, and his approach to the percussion didn’t differ much from mine. Both then and today. We
were both listening to Coltrane a lot, and it was so great to play together. I am very sensitive to what’s going on ‘in
the front’, with the soloist playing logically and expressively at the same time. These features came together in
Seifert’s play. I found his music very close, and his personality made powerful impact on whatever we played.
(Krystian Brodacki, “Janusz Stefański – zazdroszczę saksofonistom” [literally: “Janusz Stefański – I envy saxophonists”],
Jazz Forum No. 66, 1980).

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